Publications by authors named "Elen Anatriello"

11 Publications

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inhibits colitis-associated cancer via a negative regulation of intestinal inflammation in azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate model.

World J Gastroenterol 2020 Nov;26(43):6782-6794

Department of Maternal-Infant Nursing and Public Health, University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing, Ribeirão Preto 14040-902, SP, Brazil.

Background: Colitis-associated cancer (CAC) accounts for 2%-3% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases preceded by inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Intestinal microbiota has been reported to play a central role in the pathogenesis of IBD and CAC. Recently, numerous prebiotics and probiotics have being investigated as antitumor agents due to their capacity to modulate inflammatory responses. Previous studies have indicated that lactic acid bacteria could be successfully used in managing sporadic CRC, however little is known about their role in CAC.

Aim: To investigate the effect of the probiotic () during the development of an experimental model of colitis associated colon cancer (CAC).

Methods: C57BL/6 mice received an intraperitoneal injection of azoxymethane (10 mg/kg), followed by three cycles of sodium dextran sulphate diluted in water (5% w/v). Probiotic group received daily . Intestinal inflammation was determined by scoring clinical signs. Cytokines levels were determined from colon and/or tumor samples by ELISA BD OptEIATM kits. The level of significance was set at < 0.05. Graphs were generated and statistical analysis performed using the software GraphPad Prism 6.0.

Results: treatment inhibited of total tumor volume and mean size of tumors. In addition, the probiotic also attenuated the clinical signs of intestinal inflammation inducing a decrease in intestinal and tumor levels of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-1β.

Conclusion: Our results suggest a potential chemopreventive effect of probiotic on CAC. regulates the inflammatory response and preventing CAC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v26.i43.6782DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7684459PMC
November 2020

Elevated serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines potentially correlate with depression and anxiety in colorectal cancer patients in different stages of the antitumor therapy.

Cytokine 2018 04 29;104:72-77. Epub 2017 Sep 29.

Post-graduate program in Public Health Nursing, University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. Electronic address:

Depression and anxiety, the most important psychological disorders in cancer patients, have now been considered as psychoneuroimmunological disorders, in which peripheral immune activation, through the release of proinflammatory cytokines, is implicated in the variety of behavioral, neuroendocrine and neurochemical alterations associated with these disorders. Along with the tumor itself, cancer treatment can also contribute to exacerbate the production of proinflammatory cytokines. This study aimed to investigate whether proinflammatory cytokine levels are related to depression and anxiety in CRC patients in different stages of the antitumor therapy We evaluated 60 patients in three stages of antitumor therapy (Pre-chemotherapy, Under-chemotherapy and Post-chemotherapy, n=20 in each group) and 20 healthy volunteers by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Serum levels of cytokines were measured by CBA. Depression and/or anxiety were found at clinically relevant levels in CRC patients during all antitumor therapy. Patients in pre-chemotherapy group exhibited the highest concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the lowest levels of IL-10. In latter stages of treatment, cytokines reached levels similar to the control group. Correlation analysis between HADS score and cytokine serum levels revealed positive associations of anxiety and/or depression with IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α, and a negative correlation with IL-10, suggesting that cytokines are involved in the pathophysiology of these psychological disorders in CRC patients. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in these psychological disorders will allow the design of new therapeutic strategies to assist in alleviating such symptoms in cancer patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2017.09.030DOI Listing
April 2018

Fractalkine (C-X3-C motif chemokine ligand 1) as a potential biomarker for depression and anxiety in colorectal cancer patients.

Biomed Rep 2017 Aug 4;7(2):188-192. Epub 2017 Jul 4.

Post-graduate Program in Public Health Nursing, College of Nursing, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14040902, Brazil.

Fractalkine, a unique chemokine of the CX3C subfamily, is involved in the pathogenesis of different types of cancer and also in non-immune mechanisms associated with psychiatric disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether there is a correlation between anxiety, depression and fractalkine serum levels in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients in different stages of antitumor therapy. Four groups of patients undergoing treatment (n=20 per group) were evaluated: Patients with CRC who did not undergo surgical resection of the tumor; patients who underwent resection and who did not start adjuvant therapy; patients undergoing chemotherapy for ~3 months; and patients who had completed adjuvant chemotherapy regimen for ~6 months. The control group was composed of 20 healthy volunteers free of any psychiatric or immune system disease. Depression and anxiety were evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and serum levels of fractalkine were measured by cytometric bead array. Clinically relevant levels of anxiety and/or depression were observed in all of the CRC patients at the different stages of antitumor therapy. Elevated serum levels of fractalkine were identified in the CRC patients in the pre-surgery (P<0.001) and pre-chemotherapy (P<0.001) groups, but reduced upon chemotherapy (P<0.05). Furthermore, a positive correlation was observed between fractalkine levels and the HADS scores in the CRC patients at different stages of antitumor therapy. These results demonstrate a link between fractalkine, depression and anxiety in CRC patients indicating that this chemokine is involved in the pathophysiology of these comorbidities. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in these psychological disorders will allow the design of novel therapeutic strategies to assist in alleviating such symptoms in cancer patients. Therefore, fractalkine may present as a relevant biomarker for depression and anxiety in CRC patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/br.2017.937DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5525586PMC
August 2017

Interaction between saliva's adenosine and tick parasitism: effects on feeding and reproduction.

Parasit Vectors 2017 Jul 10;10(1):326. Epub 2017 Jul 10.

Department of Maternal and Child and Public Health Nursing, Ribeirão Preto School of Nursing, University of São Paulo, USP, Avenida Bandeirantes, 3900 Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, 14040-902, Brazil.

Background: It has recently been demonstrated that saliva from Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks contains adenosine (ADO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), two non-protein molecules that have significant immunomodulatory properties. These molecules can inhibit cytokine production by dendritic cells (DCs), while also reducing the expression of CD40 in these cells. However, more studies are needed for a better understanding of their participation in the feeding of ticks in vivo. This work, therefore, evaluated the importance of ADO during tick infestations. Mice were infested with adult ticks (3 couples/mouse), and their skin was collected at the tick-infested site (3rd and 7th day), and mRNA for receptors of ADO was quantified by real-time PCR.

Results: Tick infestation increased by four and two times the expression of the A2b and A3v1 receptors on day 3, respectively, while expression of other ADO receptors was unaltered. In addition, we treated mice (n = 10/group) daily with 8-(p-Sulfophenyl)theophylline, 8-pSPT, 20 mg/kg, i.p.), a non-selective antagonist of ADO receptors, and evaluated the performance of ticks during infestations. Female ticks fed on 8-pSPT-treated mice presented a reduction in their engorgement, weight and hatching rates of egg masses, and survival times of larvae compared to the same parameters presented by ticks in the control group. To investigate if these 8-pSPT-treated mice presented altered immune responses, we performed three tick infestations and collected their lymph node cells to determine the percentages and activation state of DCs and cytokine production by lymphocytes by flow cytometry (Cytometric Bead Array technique, CBA). Our data showed that 8-pSPT-treated mice presented an increase in the percentage of DCs as well as of their stimulatory and co-stimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80 and MHCII). Regarding production of T cell cytokines, we observed a significant increase in the levels of IL-2 and a significant decrease in IL-10, IL-17, TNF-α and IFN-γ cytokines.

Conclusions: These results suggest that ADO produced by ticks helps them feed and reproduce and that this effect may be due to modulation of host DCs and T cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-017-2248-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5502490PMC
July 2017

The chemokines secretion and the oxidative stress are targets of low-level laser therapy in allergic lung inflammation.

J Biophotonics 2016 12 20;9(11-12):1208-1221. Epub 2016 Sep 20.

Department of Science and Technology, Federal University of São Paulo - UNIFESP, Rua Talim, 330 - Vila Nair, PO Box 12231-280, São José dos Campos, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Recent studies show that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has an important anti-inflammatory action in acute lung inflammation. The present work explored if laser therapy is able to antagonize eosinophils and allergic inflammation induced by oxidative stress in Balb/c mice. Forty-eight hours after challenge, the leukocyte counting, ROS and nitrite/nitrate level, RANTES, CCL3, CCL8 as well as eotaxins were measured in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of laser-treated mice or not. Into the lung, some chemokines receptors, the iNOS activity and mRNA expression, and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, gluthatione, NADPH oxidase activities and thiobarbituric acid reactive species (T-Bars) were measured. Laser-treated allergic mice presented reduction of both the ICAM-1 and eosinophil in the lungs. RANTES, CCL8, CCL3 and eotaxins were reduced in BALF of laser-treated allergic mice. In allergic mice lung LLLT decreased the CCR1 and CCR3 and restored the oxidative stress balance as well. Laser decreased the lipidic peroxidation in allergic mice lung as much as increased SOD, GPx and GR. It shows that LLLT on allergic lung inflammation involves leukocyte-attractant chemokines and endogenous antioxidant. Based on results, LLLT may ultimately become a non- invasive option in allergic lung disease treatment. The top figure illustrates the laser decreasing the eosinophils migration into BALF and the bottom figure shows the laser upregulating the expression of heme-oxygenase (anti-oxidant enzyme) in lung tissue anti-oxidant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbio.201600061DOI Listing
December 2016

The sialotranscriptome of Amblyomma triste, Amblyomma parvum and Amblyomma cajennense ticks, uncovered by 454-based RNA-seq.

Parasit Vectors 2014 Sep 8;7:430. Epub 2014 Sep 8.

Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.

Background: Tick salivary constituents antagonize inflammatory, immune and hemostatic host responses, favoring tick blood feeding and the establishment of tick-borne pathogens in hosts during hematophagy. Amblyomma triste, A. cajennense and A. parvum ticks are very important in veterinary and human health because they are vectors of the etiological agents for several diseases. Insights into the tick salivary components involved in blood feeding are essential to understanding vector-pathogen-host interactions, and transcriptional profiling of salivary glands is a powerful tool to do so. Here, we functionally annotated the sialotranscriptomes of these three Amblyomma species, which allowed comparisons between these and other hematophagous arthropod species.

Methods: mRNA from the salivary glands of A. triste, A. cajennense and A. parvum ticks fed on different host species were pyrosequenced on a 454-Roche platform to generate four A. triste (nymphs fed on guinea pigs and females fed on dogs) libraries, one A. cajennense (females fed on rabbits) library and one was A. parvum (females fed on dogs) library. Bioinformatic analyses used in-house programs with a customized pipeline employing standard assembly and alignment algorithms, protein databases and protein servers.

Results: Each library yielded an average of 100,000 reads, which were assembled to obtain contigs of coding sequences (CDSs). The sialotranscriptome analyses of A. triste, A. cajennense and A. parvum ticks produced 11,240, 4,604 and 3,796 CDSs, respectively. These CDSs were classified into over 100 distinct protein families with a wide range of putative functions involved in physiological and blood feeding processes and were catalogued in annotated, hyperlinked spreadsheets. We highlighted the putative transcripts encoding saliva components with critical roles during parasitism, such as anticoagulants, immunosuppressants and anti-inflammatory molecules. The salivary content underwent changes in the abundance and repertoire of many transcripts, which depended on the tick and host species.

Conclusions: The annotated sialotranscriptomes described herein richly expand the biological knowledge of these three Amblyomma species. These comprehensive databases will be useful for the characterization of salivary proteins and can be applied to control ticks and tick-borne diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1756-3305-7-430DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4261526PMC
September 2014

Deconstructing tick saliva: non-protein molecules with potent immunomodulatory properties.

J Biol Chem 2011 Apr 26;286(13):10960-9. Epub 2011 Jan 26.

Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, School of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.

Dendritic cells (DCs) are powerful initiators of innate and adaptive immune responses. Ticks are blood-sucking ectoparasite arthropods that suppress host immunity by secreting immunomodulatory molecules in their saliva. Here, compounds present in Rhipicephalus sanguineus tick saliva with immunomodulatory effects on DC differentiation, cytokine production, and costimulatory molecule expression were identified. R. sanguineus tick saliva inhibited IL-12p40 and TNF-α while potentiating IL-10 cytokine production by bone marrow-derived DCs stimulated by Toll-like receptor-2, -4, and -9 agonists. To identify the molecules responsible for these effects, we fractionated the saliva through microcon filtration and reversed-phase HPLC and tested each fraction for DC maturation. Fractions with proven effects were analyzed by micro-HPLC tandem mass spectrometry or competition ELISA. Thus, we identified for the first time in tick saliva the purine nucleoside adenosine (concentration of ∼110 pmol/μl) as a potent anti-inflammatory salivary inhibitor of DC cytokine production. We also found prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2) ∼100 nM) with comparable effects in modulating cytokine production by DCs. Both Ado and PGE(2) inhibited cytokine production by inducing cAMP-PKA signaling in DCs. Additionally, both Ado and PGE(2) were able to inhibit expression of CD40 in mature DCs. Finally, flow cytometry analysis revealed that PGE(2), but not Ado, is the differentiation inhibitor of bone marrow-derived DCs. The presence of non-protein molecules adenosine and PGE(2) in tick saliva indicates an important evolutionary mechanism used by ticks to subvert host immune cells and allow them to successfully complete their blood meal and life cycle.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M110.205047DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3064151PMC
April 2011

An insight into the sialotranscriptome of the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus.

BMC Genomics 2010 Jul 22;11:450. Epub 2010 Jul 22.

Department of Maternal and Child and Public Health Nursing, Ribeirão Preto School of Nursing, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14049-900, Brazil.

Background: Rhipicephalus sanguineus, known as the brown dog tick, is a common ectoparasite of domestic dogs and can be found worldwide. R.sanguineus is recognized as the primary vector of the etiological agent of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis and canine babesiosis. Here we present the first description of a R. sanguineus salivary gland transcriptome by the production and analysis of 2,034 expressed sequence tags (EST) from two cDNA libraries, one consctructed using mRNA from dissected salivary glands from female ticks fed for 3-5 days (early to mid library, RsSGL1) and the another from ticks fed for 5 days (mid library, RsSGL2), identifying 1,024 clusters of related sequences.

Results: Based on sequence similarities to nine different databases, we identified transcripts of genes that were further categorized according to function. The category of putative housekeeping genes contained approximately 56% of the sequences and had on average 2.49 ESTs per cluster, the secreted protein category contained 26.6% of the ESTs and had 2.47 EST's/clusters, while 15.3% of the ESTs, mostly singletons, were not classifiable, and were annotated as "unknown function". The secreted category included genes that coded for lipocalins, proteases inhibitors, disintegrins, metalloproteases, immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory proteins, as Evasins and Da-p36, as well as basic-tail and 18.3 kDa proteins, cement proteins, mucins, defensins and antimicrobial peptides. Comparison of the abundance of ESTs from similar contigs of the two salivary gland cDNA libraries allowed the identification of differentially expressed genes, such as genes coding for Evasins and a thrombin inhibitor, which were over expressed in the RsSGL1 (early to mid library) versus RsSGL2 (mid library), indicating their role in inhibition of inflammation at the tick feeding site from the very beginning of the blood meal. Conversely, sequences related to cement (64P), which function has been correlated with tick attachment, was largely expressed in the mid library.

Conclusions: Our survey provided an insight into the R. sanguineus sialotranscriptome, which can assist the discovery of new targets for anti-tick vaccines, as well as help to identify pharmacologically active proteins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2164-11-450DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3091647PMC
July 2010

The expression of genes coding for distinct types of glycine-rich proteins varies according to the biology of three metastriate ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Amblyomma cajennense.

BMC Genomics 2010 Jun 8;11:363. Epub 2010 Jun 8.

Departament of Biochemistry and Immunology, Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14049-900, Brazil.

Background: Ticks secrete a cement cone composed of many salivary proteins, some of which are rich in the amino acid glycine in order to attach to their hosts' skin. Glycine-rich proteins (GRPs) are a large family of heterogeneous proteins that have different functions and features; noteworthy are their adhesive and tensile characteristics. These properties may be essential for successful attachment of the metastriate ticks to the host and the prolonged feeding necessary for engorgement. In this work, we analyzed Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) similar to GRPs from cDNA libraries constructed from salivary glands of adult female ticks representing three hard, metastriate species in order to verify if their expression correlated with biological differences such as the numbers of hosts ticks feed on during their parasitic life cycle, whether one (monoxenous parasite) or two or more (heteroxenous parasite), and the anatomy of their mouthparts, whether short (Brevirostrata) or long (Longirostrata). These ticks were the monoxenous Brevirostrata tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, a heteroxenous Brevirostrata tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, and a heteroxenous Longirostrata tick, Amblyomma cajennense. To further investigate this relationship, we conducted phylogenetic analyses using sequences of GRPs from these ticks as well as from other species of Brevirostrata and Longirostrata ticks.

Results: cDNA libraries from salivary glands of the monoxenous tick, R. microplus, contained more contigs of glycine-rich proteins than the two representatives of heteroxenous ticks, R. sanguineus and A. cajennense (33 versus, respectively, 16 and 11). Transcripts of ESTs encoding GRPs were significantly more numerous in the salivary glands of the two Brevirostrata species when compared to the number of transcripts in the Longirostrata tick. The salivary gland libraries from Brevirostrata ticks contained numerous contigs significantly similar to silks of true spiders (17 and 8 in, respectively, R. microplus and R. sanguineus), whereas the Longirostrata tick contained only 4 contigs. The phylogenetic analyses of GRPs from various species of ticks showed that distinct clades encoding proteins with different biochemical properties are represented among species according to their biology.

Conclusions: We found that different species of ticks rely on different types and amounts of GRPs in order to attach and feed on their hosts. Metastriate ticks with short mouthparts express more transcripts of GRPs than a tick with long mouthparts and the tick that feeds on a single host during its life cycle contain a greater variety of these proteins than ticks that feed on several hosts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2164-11-363DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2901319PMC
June 2010

The genome sequence of taurine cattle: a window to ruminant biology and evolution.

Science 2009 Apr;324(5926):522-8

To understand the biology and evolution of ruminants, the cattle genome was sequenced to about sevenfold coverage. The cattle genome contains a minimum of 22,000 genes, with a core set of 14,345 orthologs shared among seven mammalian species of which 1217 are absent or undetected in noneutherian (marsupial or monotreme) genomes. Cattle-specific evolutionary breakpoint regions in chromosomes have a higher density of segmental duplications, enrichment of repetitive elements, and species-specific variations in genes associated with lactation and immune responsiveness. Genes involved in metabolism are generally highly conserved, although five metabolic genes are deleted or extensively diverged from their human orthologs. The cattle genome sequence thus provides a resource for understanding mammalian evolution and accelerating livestock genetic improvement for milk and meat production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1169588DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2943200PMC
April 2009

Molecular epidemiology of dengue type 3 virus in Brazil and Paraguay, 2002-2004.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2006 Oct;75(4):710-5

Laboratório de Virologia, Departamento de Análises Clínicas, Toxicológicas e Bromatológicas, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto-USP, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil.

We studied the molecular epidemiology of dengue virus type 3 (DENV-3) in Brazil and Paraguay by analyzing the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (5' and 3'UTRs) and the E protein gene of viruses isolated between 2002 and 2004. Both 5' and 3'UTRs were highly conserved. However, the 3'UTR of two isolates from Brazil contained eight nucleotide deletions compared with the remaining 26 viruses. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that DENV-3 was introduced into Brazil from the Caribbean Islands at least twice and into Paraguay from Brazil at least three times.
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October 2006
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