Publications by authors named "Elaine Graf"

5 Publications

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Inpatient falls in freestanding children's hospitals.

Pediatr Nurs 2014 May-Jun;40(3):127-35

Patient falls are considered a significant safety risk, but little evidence regarding the significance of falls in children is available. A multisite, observational study of fall events occurring in pediatric inpatients (younger than 18 years of age) from Child Health Corporation of America member hospitals was conducted to determine the prevalence and significance of falls. Fall prevalence was 0.84 per 1,000 patient days with 48% classified as preventable. Injuries occurred in 32%, but only two falls resulted in an increased length of stay; none resulted in permanent disability or death. Only 47% of the children who fell were identified to be at risk for fall. Alert mechanisms were used in 60% and preventive measures in 23%. These findings suggest that while inpatient pediatric fall rates are lower than those of adults, greater diligence in identification and risk reduction may further reduce the prevalence of falls and the proportion of fall-related injuries.
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September 2014

The epidemiology of falls in hospitalized children.

Authors:
Elaine Graf

Pediatr Nurs 2012 Jul-Aug;38(4):236; author reply 236

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October 2012

Magnet children's hospitals: leading knowledge development and quality standards for inpatient pediatric fall prevention programs.

Authors:
Elaine Graf

J Pediatr Nurs 2011 Apr;26(2):122-7

Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL, USA.

Magnet hospitals are required to monitor nursing-sensitive indicators and be above the mean/median of national benchmarks for those indicators. When there is no valid national benchmark, as is the case for most of the pediatric indicators, a hospital seeking Magnet designation or redesignation is charged with taking a leadership role in developing a mechanism that leads to the establishment of a national benchmark for the indicator of choice. This article will present the efforts taken by Magnet Children's hospitals to establish valid pediatric screening tools and benchmark inpatient pediatric falls.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pedn.2010.12.007DOI Listing
April 2011

The organizational impact of a new graduate pediatric nurse mentoring program.

Nurs Econ 2008 Jul-Aug;26(4):243-9

Clinical and Organizational Development, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL, USA.

Successful mentoring programs for new graduate nurses are designed to provide professional supports to ease the transition of these newcomers from student to practicing nurse. In the financially constrained health care environment, a resource-intensive program can be sustained only by leaders who see quantitative evidence of organizational impact over time. A descriptive study was undertaken at a pediatric academic medical center to compare the job satisfaction and retention rates of two cohorts of new graduate nurses: one before and one after the implementation of a Pediatric RN Internship Program. In this study overall job satisfaction was significantly higher in the post-internship group as compared to the pre-internship group. Improved job satisfaction was also reflected in a lower turnover rate (12% vs. 20% in the pre-internship group) that was sustained during the 2-year post-intervention study period. By lowering turnover rates, organizations avoid costs associated with recruitment, orientation, and temporary labor coverage for vacant RN positions.
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November 2008

Graduate nurse perceptions of the work experience.

Nurs Econ 2006 May-Jun;24(3):150-5, 123

Department of Clinical and Organizational Development, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL, USA.

Findings from a longitudinal study on the perceptions of the work environment and job satisfaction for new graduate nurses in the first 18 months of employment at a Magnet Midwestern urban academic pediatric medical center are described. The findings indicated that orientation assisted the new graduate to become confident in his/her clinical competence and work management. By 18 months, the new graduate felt satisfied with access to resources and the ability to participate in professional development opportunities. The results suggest that the new graduate nurse's career adjustment extends beyond mastering clinical skills and includes a lifestyle adjustment to a profession that requires service 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
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July 2006