Publications by authors named "Eirini Alexiou"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Literature review: Evidence-based health outcomes and perceptions of the built environment in pediatric hospital facilities.

J Pediatr Nurs 2021 Apr 16. Epub 2021 Apr 16.

Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothia Forum for Clinical Trials, Gothenburg, Sweden; Center for Ethics, Law, and Mental Health (CELAM), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Problem: The current knowledge of evidence-based design for adults is not always implemented when hospital buildings are designed. Scientific data are sparse on the effects of hospital design in pediatric settings on health outcomes in children, parents, and staff. The objective of this review is to determine the evidence-based impact of the built environment in pediatric hospital facilities on health outcomes in children, parents, and staff.

Eligibility Criteria: A systematic literature review was carried out on the electronic databases Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline and CINAHL from the period of 2008 to 2019. The review considered studies using either quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methodologies.

Sample: Out of 1414 reviewed articles the result is based on eight included articles.

Results: Two of these eight articles included health outcomes. The other six articles presented results on measures of perceptions and/or satisfaction for children, parents or staff with the built environment when transitioning to a new or renovated facility. These were generally higher for the new compared to the old facility.

Conclusions: Given the small number of studies addressing the question posed in this review, no firm conclusions can be drawn.

Implications: The review illustrates the need for more research in the pediatric setting assessing the evidence-based health outcomes of aspects of physical environmental design in pediatric hospitals or units in children, parents and staff.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pedn.2021.04.013DOI Listing
April 2021

Translation and Validation of the Greek Version of the Antipsychotics and Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (ASFQ).

Sex Med 2021 Mar 12;9(3):100334. Epub 2021 Mar 12.

Department of Mental Health and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Nursing, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.

Introduction: Sexual dysfunction in patients with psychoses may be associated with the psychiatric illness itself (negative symptoms, such as apathy, and avolition), comorbid somatic health, psychosocial factors (stigmatization, discrimination), and the use of psychotropic drugs. In Greece, research into the study of antipsychotic-induced sexual dysfunction is not sufficient.

Aim: This study was conducted to translate and validate the Greek version of the Antipsychotics and Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (ASFQ) in a sample of patients receiving antipsychotic treatment.

Methods: A "forward-backward translation" method was applied. A pilot study was conducted with 15 outpatients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder under antipsychotics treatment. Patients also completed the "Subjects' Response to Antipsychotics (SRA)" questionnaire in order to assess the validity of the ASFQ. The ASFQ and the SRA questionnaire were completed twice within 2 weeks.

Main Outcome Measures: Reliability (internal consistency and test-retest) and validity were assessed.

Results: The Greek translation of ASFQ was reliable, with excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's a = 0.90 for men and 0.95 for women in both measurements). In addition, the Spearman correlation coefficient was 1 (P< .001) in all Likert-type questions in both assessments. Finally, Spearman correlation coefficients between ASFQ and SRA were moderately positive to strongly positive (between 0.25 and 1) in both assessments, demonstrating moderate to high validity.

Conclusions: The Greek version of the ASFQ has proved to be a reliable and valid clinical instrument, hence it can be used in further studies in the Greek population. M Angelaki, P Galanis, A Igoumenou, et al. Translation and Validation of the Greek Version of the Antipsychotics and Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (ASFQ). J Sex Med 2021;9:100334.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.esxm.2021.100334DOI Listing
March 2021

The Influence of Evidence-Based Design on Staff Perceptions of a Supportive Environment for Person-Centered Care in Forensic Psychiatry.

J Forensic Nurs 2020 Jul/Sep;16(3):E23-E30

Institute of Health and Care Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.

This prospective longitudinal study aimed to examine the relocation of three forensic psychiatric hospitals in Sweden into new facilities. The research focused on the effects of the physical and psychosocial environment and other staff-related parameters on the delivery of person-centered care after relocation. In forensic psychiatry, most relocations to new environments are to support a person-centered approach and to promote patients' rehabilitation and reintegration into society. Hopefully, this is undertaken in accordance with an evidence-based design strategy allowing improvement in staff satisfaction and working conditions as well as their capacity to provide individualized care. All staff members working on the wards of the facilities in question were invited to participate in the study. Data were collected prospectively between 2010 and 2014, before and after relocation of the forensic psychiatric clinics to new buildings. Structured validated questionnaires were employed. Staff members' job satisfaction and perceptions of a person-centered physical and psychosocial environment increased after relocation and provide evidence that staff perceptions of ward atmosphere in forensic psychiatric clinics are susceptible to factors in the physical and psychosocial environment. The importance of always taking the environmental factors into consideration, to achieve greater staff well-being and capacity to accomplish goals in forensic psychiatry, is emphasized.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JFN.0000000000000261DOI Listing
February 2021

Evidence-Based Design Has a Sustainable Positive Effect on Patients' Perceptions of Quality of Care in Forensic Psychiatry: A 3-Year Follow-Up Study.

J Forensic Nurs 2019 Jan/Mar;15(1):60-68

Center for Ethics, Law, and Mental Health, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.

This prospective longitudinal study aimed to assess the sustainable effect on patients' assessment of ward atmosphere and quality of care at three forensic psychiatric clinics relocated to new facilities built with the latest evidence-based healthcare environment design to support recovery. Baseline data were collected in the old facilities and during three follow-ups after relocation, between 2010 and 2016. Of 74 patients who gave informed consent to participate, 58 patients (100%) answered the questionnaires at baseline, with 25 patients (43%) completing them at Follow-up 1, 11 patients (19%) at Follow-up 2, and seven patients (12%) at Follow-up 3. This study provides evidence that the mean values of patients' perceptions of care quality in these forensic psychiatric facilities increased when moving to new buildings and were stable up to 3 years after relocation, which was statistically significant in the domain of secluded environment (p < 0.05). The sample size at Follow-up 3 was small, and thus the results are limited, which indicates that further research is needed to confirm the findings.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JFN.0000000000000226DOI Listing
March 2019

Person-Centered Incontinence Care in Residential Care Facilities for Older Adults With Cognitive Decline: Feasibility and Preliminary Effects on Quality of Life and Quality of Care.

J Gerontol Nurs 2018 Nov;44(11):10-19

The current study operationalized, assessed, and evaluated the feasibility and preliminary effects of implementing a person-centered approach to incontinence care for older adults with cognitive decline in residential care facilities (RCFs) in Sweden. Twenty health care workers were purposively sampled from two intervention RCFs. Process outcome was measured as number of assessments conducted for incontinence management. Impact outcome measures were quality of life, basal assessment of incontinence, incontinence actions taken, and personally chosen incontinence aids. A usual care control group RCF was matched by resident case-mix and geographic region. Introduction of a person-centered approach showed an increase in residents' quality of life in the intervention group compared to baseline and the control group. A positive effect was found on the number of urinary incontinence assessments conducted (p < 0.05). In addition, the number of person-centered caring actions (e.g., toilet assistance) was significantly higher during and 6 months after implementation of the person-centered approach. Implementing a person-centered approach in clinical practice focused on incontinence care, quality of care, and quality of life is supported for RCF residents. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 44(11), 10-19.].
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/00989134-20181010-04DOI Listing
November 2018

Sustainability of a person-centered ward atmosphere and possibility to provide person-centered forensic psychiatric care after facility relocation.

J Forensic Leg Med 2018 May 11;56:108-113. Epub 2018 Apr 11.

Center for Ethics, Law, and Mental Health (CELAM), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Forensic Psychiatric Clinic, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address:

Objective: This longitudinal study aims to assess the sustainability of staff perceptions of ward atmosphere and their possibility to provide person-centered forensic psychiatric care after relocation to new hospitals that aimed to provide supportive work conditions for the staff to be able to perform care of high quality.

Methods: In this study we only present the result for the repeated measures, that is, only the individuals that performed both the questionnaires at baseline and at the three follow-ups. Data were collected prospectively between 2010 and 2016; before (baseline) and after relocation of the forensic psychiatric clinics to new buildings, i.e., after six months (follow-up 1), after one year (follow-up 2) and after two years (follow-up 3), respectively. Data were obtained by employing structured validated questionnaires.

Results: The main findings of this study display an improvement in the staff assessment of a person-centered atmosphere from baseline to follow-up 3 in the domains of safety, everydayness and community where safety was evaluated the highest. No sustainable significant changes were found concerning staff's assessment of the support for them to provide person-centered care.

Conclusion: The findings show sustainability of person-centered ward atmosphere in forensic psychiatric care according to staff's assessment after relocation from traditional health care facilities to evidence-based designed premises. In this study the increased staff perception of the possibility to provide person-centered care in the new facilities could not be revealed as sustainability over the two years of follow-up.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jflm.2018.04.006DOI Listing
May 2018

The impact of facility relocation on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care.

J Forensic Leg Med 2016 Aug 5;42:1-7. Epub 2016 May 5.

Institute of Health and Care Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Quality Assurance, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address:

In recent years, large groups of forensic psychiatric patients have been relocated into new medium- and maximum-security forensic psychiatric facilities in Sweden, where a psychosocial care approach is embedded. From this perspective and on the assumption that physical structures affect the therapeutic environment, a prospective longitudinal study was designed to investigate the impact of the facility relocation of three forensic psychiatric hospitals on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care. Participants were patients over 18 years of age sentenced to compulsory forensic psychiatric treatment. Data were obtained by validated questionnaires. Overall, 58 patients (78%) answered the questionnaires at baseline with a total of 25 patients (34%) completing follow-up 1 at six months and 11 patients (15%) completing follow-up 2, one year after relocation. Approximately two-thirds of the participants at all time-points were men and their age range varied from 18 to 69. The results of this study showed that poor physical environment features can have a severe impact on care quality and can reduce the possibilities for person-centered care. Furthermore, the study provides evidence that the patients' perceptions of person-centered care in forensic psychiatric clinics are highly susceptible to factors in the physical and psychosocial environment. Future work will explore the staff's perception of ward atmosphere and the possibilities to adapt a person-centered approach in forensic psychiatric care after facility relocation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jflm.2016.04.014DOI Listing
August 2016