Publications by authors named "Eileen S Yale"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Replacing Bell Palsy with Idiopathic Facial Nerve Paralysis: What Says the Evidence?

Am J Med 2021 May;134(5):e358

Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2020.07.009DOI Listing
May 2021

The history of observed signs of acute appendicitis and peritoneal inflammation.

Am J Emerg Med 2021 Apr 17. Epub 2021 Apr 17.

University of Florida, Division of General Internal Medicine, 2000 SW Archer Rd., Gainesville, FL 32608, United States.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2021.04.036DOI Listing
April 2021

Letter in response to the article: "Blood glucose levels should be considered as a new vital sign indicative of prognosis during hospitalization" (Kesavdev et al.).

Diabetes Metab Syndr 2021 Jan-Feb;15(1):465. Epub 2021 Feb 6.

University of Central Florida College of Medicine, 6850 Lake Nona Blvd, Orlando, FL, 32827, USA. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dsx.2021.02.005DOI Listing
April 2021

Left hand index finger predominance of Quincke pulse.

North Clin Istanb 2020 28;7(4):415-416. Epub 2020 May 28.

Marshfield Clinic Research Institute, Wisconsin, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.14744/nci.2020.04710DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7521101PMC
May 2020

Fitz-Hugh-Curtis and Peritonitis: Sorting Through the Features that Define This Syndrome.

Am J Med 2020 10;133(10):e611

University of Florida, Division of General Internal Medicine, Gainesville.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2020.04.007DOI Listing
October 2020

Learning about the diagnosis of Bouveret syndrome from Bouveret.

J Microbiol Immunol Infect 2021 Apr 18;54(2):339-340. Epub 2020 Jul 18.

University of Florida, Division of General Internal Medicine, 2000 SW Archer Rd. Gainesville, FL 32608, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmii.2020.07.005DOI Listing
April 2021

Fothergill and Carnett signs and rectus sheath hematoma.

J Rural Med 2020 Jul 17;15(3):130-131. Epub 2020 Jul 17.

Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Florida, USA.

Fothergill and Carnett signs are used to distinguish intrabdominal from abdominal wall diseases. These bedside techniques may be useful in distinguishing intrabdominal from an abdominal wall cause of disease. Timely and accurate diagnosis of rectus sheath hematoma in at risk patients in the appropriate clinical setting is important because of the associated morbidity and mortality associated with this condition. Diagnosis requires an accurate and thorough history and bedside physical examination and performance of these maneuvers as originally described.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2185/jrm.2019-019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7369406PMC
July 2020

Tomisaku Kawasaki and Kawasaki disease.

Childs Nerv Syst 2020 Jul 11. Epub 2020 Jul 11.

University of Florida, Division of General Internal Medicine, 2000 SW Archer Rd., Gainesville, FL, 32608, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00381-020-04784-3DOI Listing
July 2020

A bedside technique and historical aspects of the cutaneous findings in scurvy.

Int J Surg Case Rep 2020 21;71:126-127. Epub 2020 May 21.

University of Florida, Division of General Internal Medicine, 2000 SW Archer Rd., Gainesville, FL 32608, United States. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijscr.2020.04.105DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7256203PMC
May 2020

Lemierre Syndrome: An emerging not forgotten disease.

J Microbiol Immunol Infect 2021 Apr 7;54(2):331-332. Epub 2020 May 7.

University of Florida, Division of General Internal Medicine, 2000 SW Archer Rd. Gainesville, FL, 32608, USA. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmii.2020.04.016DOI Listing
April 2021

Historical terminology and superior mesenteric artery syndrome.

Int J Surg Case Rep 2020 23;67:282-283. Epub 2020 Jan 23.

University of Florida, Division of General Internal Medicine, 2000 SW Archer Rd. Gainesville, FL 32608, USA. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijscr.2019.12.043DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7076277PMC
January 2020

Venothromboembolic signs and medical eponyms: Part I.

Thromb Res 2019 Oct 21;182:194-204. Epub 2019 Jun 21.

University of Central Florida College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 6850 Lake Nona Blvd, Orlando, FL 32827, United States of America. Electronic address:

Eponyms are honorific terms ascribed to individuals who discovered a sign, test, syndrome, technique, or instrument. Despite some contentions, eponyms continue to be widely ingrained and incorporated into the medical literature and contemporary language. Physical signs are considered unreliable methods alone for detecting deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The accuracy of the majority of these signs is unknown. For those signs that have been studied, there are a number of methodological limitations hindering the ability to draw meaningful conclusions about their accuracy and validity in clinical practice. Nevertheless, some findings when present and used in conjunction with other key signs, symptoms, and aspects of the patients history may be useful in further supporting the clinical suspicion and likelihood of DVT and/or pulmonary embolism (PE) or venothromboembolism (VTE). These signs also provide the means to better recognize the relationship between clinical findings and VTE. The acquisition of historical knowledge about these signs is important as it further enhances our understanding and appreciation of the diagnostic acumen that physicians were required to employ and to diagnose VTE prior to the advent of advanced imaging methods. Described in this paper is a brief overview of thrombosis as enumerated by Rudolf Virchow, and eponymous signs described in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2019.06.012DOI Listing
October 2019

Venothromboembolic signs and medical eponyms: Part II.

Thromb Res 2019 Oct 21;182:205-213. Epub 2019 Jun 21.

University of Central Florida College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 6850 Lake Nona Blvd, Orlando, FL 32827, United States of America. Electronic address:

Eponyms were established to serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. The use of eponyms remains controversial, and important questions have been raised regarding their appropriateness. Although there have been instances where eponyms were abandoned, the remainder are largely embedded within the established literature making their disappearance unlikely. Physicians used a variety of techniques to describe signs of medical eponyms as a method for diagnosing deep venous thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE) or venothromboembolism (VTE). These methods (observation, palpation, pressure, or maneuvers), were detected during the physical examination and using bedside sphygmomanometer or radiographic imaging. Reviewed are both common and less frequently encountered VTE eponyms identified during the physical examination and radiologic imaging. Most of these signs have not been further studied and, therefore, there is a lack of information regarding their accuracy and reliability in clinical practice.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2019.06.011DOI Listing
October 2019