Publications by authors named "Eileen Lydon"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Evaluating Inflammatory Versus Mechanical Back Pain in Individuals with Psoriatic Arthritis: A Review of the Literature.

Rheumatol Ther 2020 Dec 15;7(4):667-684. Epub 2020 Sep 15.

Arthritis Center of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, USA.

Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic immune-mediated disease characterized by psoriatic skin and nail changes, peripheral joint inflammation, enthesitis, dactylitis, and/or axial involvement, either alone or in combination with each other. The presence of axial involvement has been shown to be a marker of PsA severity; however, there is no widely accepted definition of axial involvement in PsA (axPsA) or consensus on how or when to screen and treat patients with suspected axPsA. Chronic back pain is a prominent feature of axPsA and is thought to have a relevant role in early identification of disease. Chronic back pain can be caused by inflammatory back pain (IBP) or mechanical back pain (MBP). However, MBP can complicate recognition of IBP and delay diagnosis of axPsA. While MBP can also be associated with chronic back pain of ≥ 3 months in duration that is typical of IBP, IBP is characterized by inflammation of the sacroiliac joint and lower spine that is differentiated from MBP by key characteristic features, including insidious onset at age < 40 years, improvement with exercise but not with rest, and nighttime pain. This review discusses the differences in identification and management of IBP and MBP in patients with PsA with axPsA. The summary of available evidence highlights the importance of appropriate and timely screening, difficulties and limitations of differential diagnoses and treatment, and unmet needs in axPsA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40744-020-00234-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7695767PMC
December 2020

A case of systemic lupus erythematosus associated with longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis, cerebral neutrophilic vasculitis, and cerebritis.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2014 ;72(4):294-300

Systemic Lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with multiple clinical presentations and manifestations. Here, we report an intriguing case of a 30-year-old female with full-blown SLE, associated with longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) manifested by lower extremity weakness, neurogenic bladder and bowel, and central nervous system (CNS) lupus clinically manifested by changes in mood and behavior as well as neutrophilic vasculitis and cerebritis on pathology. LETM is a rare complication of SLE; however, what makes this case even more intriguing is that it additionally had cerebral lesions consistent with neutrophilic vasculitis and cerebritis, and that it may all have started at least 10 years prior with nonspecific musculoskeletal manifestations subsequently followed by a rash as well as intractable fevers of unknown etiology—much later attributed to her lupus. Although she had a most concerning and dramatic presentation, she, so far, had responded very well to therapy including pulse dose steroids, plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG), cyclophosphamide, and related medications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2015

Proliferative lupus nephritis and leukocytoclastic vasculitis during treatment with etanercept.

J Rheumatol 2005 Apr;32(4):740-3

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine/Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, New York, USA.

Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a proinflammatory cytokine. Agents that neutralize TNF-alpha are effective in the treatment of disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), spondyloarthropathies, and inflammatory bowel disease. TNF-alpha antagonist therapy has been associated with the development of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) antibodies, as well as the infrequent development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like disease. We describe the first case of biopsy-confirmed proliferative lupus nephritis and leukocytoclastic vasculitis in a patient treated with etanercept for JRA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 2005