Publications by authors named "Eiko Yokota"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Case of Successful Tracheal Tube Exchange With McGrath MAC for Tube Damage During Oral Surgery.

Anesth Prog 2020 09;67(3):174-176

Department of Anesthesiology, Nihon University School of Dentistry, Tokyo, Japan.

A patient undergoing a bilateral sagittal split and LeFort 1 maxillary osteotomy performed under general anesthesia required emergent intraoperative exchange of a potentially damaged nasotracheal tube. This exchange was smoothly performed under constant indirect visualization using the McGrath MAC video laryngoscopy system. After the exchange, ventilation of the patient dramatically improved. The removed endotracheal tube was torn 19 cm from the distal tip. The McGrath MAC was useful for visualizing the glottis and confirming the entire course of the tube exchange despite the patient's having a difficult airway (Cormack-Lehane grade 3).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-67-02-01DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7530811PMC
September 2020

Spike Timing Rigidity Is Maintained in Bursting Neurons under Pentobarbital-Induced Anesthetic Conditions.

Front Neural Circuits 2016 14;10:86. Epub 2016 Nov 14.

Department of Pharmacology, School of Dentistry, Nihon UniversityChiyoda, Japan; Division of Oral and Craniomaxillofacial Research, Dental Research Center, School of Dentistry, Nihon UniversityChiyoda, Japan; Molecular Dynamics Imaging Unit, RIKEN Center for Life Science TechnologiesKobe, Japan.

Pentobarbital potentiates γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission by prolonging the open time of GABA receptors. However, it is unknown how pentobarbital regulates cortical neuronal activities via local circuits . To examine this question, we performed extracellular unit recording in rat insular cortex under awake and anesthetic conditions. Not a few studies apply time-rescaling theorem to detect the features of repetitive spike firing. Similar to these methods, we define an average spike interval locally in time using random matrix theory (RMT), which enables us to compare different activity states on a universal scale. Neurons with high spontaneous firing frequency (>5 Hz) and bursting were classified as HFB neurons ( = 10), and those with low spontaneous firing frequency (<10 Hz) and without bursting were classified as non-HFB neurons ( = 48). Pentobarbital injection (30 mg/kg) reduced firing frequency in all HFB neurons and in 78% of non-HFB neurons. RMT analysis demonstrated that pentobarbital increased in the number of neurons with repulsion in both HFB and non-HFB neurons, suggesting that there is a correlation between spikes within a short interspike interval (ISI). Under awake conditions, in 50% of HFB and 40% of non-HFB neurons, the decay phase of normalized histograms of spontaneous firing were fitted to an exponential function, which indicated that the first spike had no correlation with subsequent spikes. In contrast, under pentobarbital-induced anesthesia conditions, the number of non-HFB neurons that were fitted to an exponential function increased to 80%, but almost no change in HFB neurons was observed. These results suggest that under both awake and pentobarbital-induced anesthetized conditions, spike firing in HFB neurons is more robustly regulated by preceding spikes than by non-HFB neurons, which may reflect the GABA receptor-mediated regulation of cortical activities. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording in the IC slice preparation was performed to compare the regularity of spike timing between pyramidal and fast-spiking (FS) neurons, which presumably correspond to non-HFB and HFB neurons, respectively. Repetitive spike firing of FS neurons exhibited a lower variance of ISI than pyramidal neurons both in control and under application of pentobarbital, supporting the above hypothesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fncir.2016.00086DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5107820PMC
October 2017

Opioid subtype- and cell-type-dependent regulation of inhibitory synaptic transmission in the rat insular cortex.

Neuroscience 2016 Dec 8;339:478-490. Epub 2016 Oct 8.

Department of Pharmacology, Nihon University School of Dentistry, 1-8-13 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8310, Japan; Division of Oral and Craniomaxillofacial Research, Dental Research Center, Nihon University School of Dentistry, 1-8-13 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8310, Japan; RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047, Japan. Electronic address:

The insular cortex (IC) plays a principal role in the regulation of pain processing. Although opioidergic agonists depress cortical excitatory synaptic transmission, little is known about opioidergic roles in inhibitory synaptic transmission. In the IC, the opioid receptors differentially regulate the excitatory propagation: agonists of the mu (MOR), delta (DOR), and kappa (KOR) exhibit suppressive, facilitative, and little effects, respectively. Thus, we aimed to examine the effects of opioid receptor agonists on unitary inhibitory postsynaptic currents (uIPSCs) in the IC. Pyramidal and GABAergic neurons in the rat IC were recorded by a multiple whole-cell patch-clamp technique. [D-Ala,N-Me-Phe,Gly-ol]-Enkephalin acetate salt (DAMGO), an MOR agonist, reduced uIPSC amplitude by 74% in fast-spiking GABAergic interneuron (FS)→FS connections without a significant effect on FS→pyramidal cell (Pyr) connections. These effects of DAMGO were also observed in non-FS→FS and non-FS→Pyr connections: DAMGO reduced the uIPSC amplitude in non-FS→FS but not in non-FS→Pyr connections. DAMGO-induced depression of uIPSCs was blocked by the MOR antagonist, D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH. The DOR agonist, [D-Pen]-Enkephalin hydrate (DPDPE), reduced uIPSC amplitude by 39% in FS→FS and by 49% in FS→Pyr connections, which was antagonized by the DOR antagonist, naltrindole. However, DPDPE had little effect on non-FS→FS/Pyr connections. (±)-trans-U-50488 methanesulfonate salt (U50488), a KOR agonist, had little effect on uIPSC in FS→FS/Pyr connections. These results suggest that MOR-induced uIPSC depression in FS→FS and non-FS→FS, but not FS→Pyr and non-FS→Pyr connections, results in the depression of excitatory propagation in the IC, which may be an underlying mechanism of the powerful analgesic effects of MOR agonists.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2016.10.004DOI Listing
December 2016

Opposite effects of mu and delta opioid receptor agonists on excitatory propagation induced in rat somatosensory and insular cortices by dental pulp stimulation.

Neurosci Lett 2016 08 28;628:52-8. Epub 2016 May 28.

Department of Pharmacology, Nihon University School of Dentistry, 1-8-13 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8310, Japan; Division of Oral and Craniomaxillofacial Research, Dental Research Center, Nihon University School of Dentistry, 1-8-13 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8310, Japan; RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047, Japan. Electronic address:

The insular cortex (IC) contributes to nociceptive information processing. IC neurons express opioid receptors, including the mu (MOR), kappa (KOR), and delta (DOR) subtypes. Opioidergic agonists suppress excitatory synaptic transmission in the cerebral cortex. In addition, morphine injection into the IC reduces responses to noxious thermal stimuli. However, the mechanisms of the opioid-dependent modulation of cortical excitation at the macroscopic level, which bridge the cellular and behavioral findings, have remained unknown. The present in vivo optical imaging study aimed to examine the effects of the agonists of each subtype on cortical excitatory propagation in the IC and the neighboring cortices, the primary (S1) and secondary somatosensory (S2) areas. To assess the opioidergic effects on the cortical circuits, we applied electrical stimulation to the maxillary 1st molar pulp, which induced excitation in the ventral part of S1 and the S2/insular oral region (IOR). The initial excitatory response was observed 10-14ms after stimulation, and then excitation propagated concentrically. DAMGO (10-100μM), an MOR agonist, suppressed the amplitude of cortical excitation and shrank the maximum excitation areas in S1 and S2/IOR. In contrast, 10-100μM DPDPE, a DOR agonist, increased the amplitude of excitation and expanded the area of maximum excitation. U50488 (10-100μM), a KOR agonist, had little effect on cortical excitation. These results suggest that MOR-induced suppression of excitatory propagation in the IC is an underlying mechanism of the powerful analgesic effects of MOR agonists. In contrast, DOR may play a minor role in suppressing acute pain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2016.05.065DOI Listing
August 2016