Publications by authors named "Eija Rorarius"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The acoustic voice quality index version 02.02 in the Finnish-speaking population.

Logoped Phoniatr Vocol 2020 Jul 5;45(2):49-56. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Speech and Voice Research Laboratory, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.

The Acoustic Voice Quality Index (AVQI) is a multiparametric tool for objectively measuring the general acoustic characteristics of voice. The AVQI uses both sustained vowel and continuous speech in its analysis, and therefore, a validation is required for different languages. In the present study, validation was performed in the Finnish-speaking population. The study included 200 native Finnish-speaking participants of whom 115 were voice patients attending a phoniatric clinic, and the remaining 85 subjects participated in the study as healthy controls. Voice samples were recorded, and the auditory evaluation was performed by five speech therapists. An ordinal four-point interval scale was used to evaluate the degree of voice abnormality (Grade, G). Several statistical analyses were performed to test the validity and the diagnostic accuracy of the AVQI in the Finnish-speaking population. The inter-rater reliability of four of the five raters was high enough to allow the use of in the validation. There was a statistically significant correlation between the AVQI scores and the evaluation of overall perceptual voice quality ( = 0.74). The results confirmed the good discriminatory power of the AVQI in differentiating between normal and abnormal voice qualities. The AVQI 02.02 threshold value for dysphonia was 2.87 in the Finnish-speaking population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14015439.2018.1556332DOI Listing
July 2020

Voice activity and participation profile in assessing the effects of voice disorders on quality of life: estimation of the validity, reliability and responsiveness of the Finnish version.

Folia Phoniatr Logop 2011 8;63(3):113-21. Epub 2010 Oct 8.

Eye, Ear and Oral Diseases, Department of Phoniatrics in Tampere University Hospital, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.

Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity, reliability and responsiveness of the Finnish version of the Voice Activity and Participation Profile (VAPP), a self-assessment questionnaire to measure psychosocial limitations caused by voice disorders.

Methods: The study was conducted in Tampere University Hospital in 2004 and 2005. Voice patients (n = 142) with diverse chronic voice pathologies received 3-5 sessions of voice therapy. Controls were known individuals with healthy voices (n = 127). The VAPP form was completed before attending hospital, at the first visit to hospital and before and after voice therapy.

Results: When comparing patients with healthy controls significant differences were found in score means. After brief voice therapy, the VAPP values improved moderately as 60% of patients had effect size of 0.27 or over. Physicians' advice did not improve VAPP scores. The VAPP question profile was regarded as consistent. Cronbach's alpha for the question profile was 0.958 and for the subsections 0.865.

Conclusions: VAPP appeared to be valid and responsive to the intervention. In test-retest reliability, although intraclass correlation was high (0.905), there was a trend for the second answers to be better than the first. Some proposals are given to improve the practicality of the VAPP form.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000316311DOI Listing
August 2011

Voice Activity and Participation Profile (VAPP) in assessing the effects of voice disorders on patients' quality of life: validity and reliability of the Finnish version of VAPP.

Logoped Phoniatr Vocol 2007 ;32(1):3-8

Department of Finnish, Information Studies and Logopedics, University of Oulu, Finland.

The Voice Activity and Participation Profile (VAPP) is a self-assessment questionnaire describing the limitation of activities and participation of individuals with dysphonia. In this study, the validity and reliability of the Finnish translation of the VAPP was evaluated using 43 outpatients with various functional and organic voice disorders. A control group was formed consisting of 43 subjects matched according to age, gender, and profession, with normal voices. The VAPP was sensitive for voice disorders and items in the questionnaire had high internal consistency. The VAPP had a strong correlation with the Voice Handicap Index. The results showed that the questionnaire is a valid and reliable instrument to measure voice-related quality of life. It also showed that limitations in activity and participation levels should be examined separately.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14015430600784386DOI Listing
July 2007

Swallowing after free-flap reconstruction in patients with oral and pharyngeal cancer.

Oral Oncol 2006 May 20;42(5):501-9. Epub 2005 Dec 20.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.

Swallowing and intraoral sensation outcome were investigated prospectively after microvascular free-flap reconstruction. Forty-one patients with a large oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma underwent free-flap surgery usually combined with radiotherapy. The patients completed modified barium swallow, self-rating of swallowing, and 2-point moving discrimination preoperatively and at four time points during the 12-month follow-up period, and a plain chest X-ray one year after operation. Swallowing was impaired with respect to an objective and subjective measure after therapy. Rates for nonsilent and silent aspiration increased during the follow-up. Intraoral sensation deteriorated. Swallowing outcome was not related to sensation. One year after surgery, 86% of the patients ate regular masticated or soft food. Microvascular transfers offer a reasonable option for oral reconstruction. This study does not support the need for sensate flaps. Swallowing problems should be routinely sought and patients rehabilitated during a sufficiently long follow-up with videofluorography regardless of the patient's perception of swallowing.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oraloncology.2005.10.007DOI Listing
May 2006