Publications by authors named "Edwin J Tijhaar"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Systematic Comparison of Zwitterionic and Non-Zwitterionic Antifouling Polymer Brushes on a Bead-Based Platform.

Langmuir 2019 02 28;35(5):1181-1191. Epub 2018 Sep 28.

Laboratory of Organic Chemistry , Wageningen University , Stippeneng 4 , 6708 WE Wageningen , The Netherlands.

Nonspecific adsorption of biomolecules to solid surfaces, a process called biofouling, is a major concern in many biomedical applications. Great effort has been made in the development of antifouling polymer coatings that are capable of repelling the nonspecific adsorption of proteins, cells, and micro-organisms. In this respect, we herein contribute to understanding the factors that determine which polymer brush results in the best antifouling coating. To this end, we compared five different monomers: two sulfobetaines, a carboxybetaine, a phosphocholine, and a hydroxyl acrylamide. The antifouling coatings were analyzed using our previously described bead-based method with flow cytometry as the read-out system. This method allows for the quick and automated analysis of thousands of beads per second, enabling fast analysis and good statistics. We report the first direct comparison made between a sulfobetaine with opposite charges separated by two and three methylene groups and a carboxybetaine bearing two separating methylene groups. It was concluded that both the distance between opposite charges and the nature of the anionic groups have a distinct effect on the antifouling performance. Phosphocholines and simple hydroxyl acrylamides are not often compared with the betaines. However, here we found that they perform equally well or even better, yielding the following overall antifouling ranking: HPMAA ≥ PCMA-2 ≈ CBMAA-2 > SBMAA-2 > SBMAA-3 ≫ nonmodified beads (HPMAA being the best).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.8b01832DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6366122PMC
February 2019

Highly Specific Binding on Antifouling Zwitterionic Polymer-Coated Microbeads as Measured by Flow Cytometry.

ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 2017 Nov 24;9(44):38211-38221. Epub 2017 Oct 24.

Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University , Stippeneng 4, 6708 WE Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Micron- and nano-sized particles are extensively used in various biomedical applications. However, their performance is often drastically hampered by the nonspecific adsorption of biomolecules, a process called biofouling, which can cause false-positive and false-negative outcomes in diagnostic tests. Although antifouling coatings have been extensively studied on flat surfaces, their use on micro- and nanoparticles remains largely unexplored, despite the widespread experimental (specifically, clinical) uncertainties that arise because of biofouling. Here, we describe the preparation of magnetic micron-sized beads coated with zwitterionic sulfobetaine polymer brushes that display strong antifouling characteristics. These coated beads can then be equipped with recognition elements of choice, to enable the specific binding of target molecules. First, we present a proof of principle with biotin-functionalized beads that are able to specifically bind fluorescently labeled streptavidin from a complex mixture of serum proteins. Moreover, we show the versatility of the method by demonstrating that it is also possible to functionalize the beads with mannose moieties to specifically bind the carbohydrate-binding protein concanavalin A. Flow cytometry was used to show that thus-modified beads only bind specifically targeted proteins, with minimal/near-zero nonspecific protein adsorption from other proteins that are present. These antifouling zwitterionic polymer-coated beads, therefore, provide a significant advancement for the many bead-based diagnostic and other biosensing applications that require stringent antifouling conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.7b09725DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5682608PMC
November 2017

Cyprinid Herpesvirus 3 Il10 Inhibits Inflammatory Activities of Carp Macrophages and Promotes Proliferation of Igm+ B Cells and Memory T Cells in a Manner Similar to Carp Il10.

J Immunol 2015 Oct 14;195(8):3694-704. Epub 2015 Sep 14.

Cell Biology and Immunology Group, Department of Animal Sciences, Wageningen University, 6708WD Wageningen, the Netherlands; and

Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is the causative agent of a lethal disease of carp and encodes for an Il10 homolog (ORF134). Our previous studies with a recombinant ORF134-deleted strain and the derived revertant strain suggested that cyprinid herpesvirus 3 Il10 (CyHV-3 Il10 [cyhv3Il10]) is not essential for viral replication in vitro, or virulence in vivo. In apparent contrast, cyhv3Il10 is one of the most abundant proteins of the CyHV-3 secretome and is structurally very similar to carp Il10 and also human IL10. To date, studies addressing the biological activity of cyhv3Il10 on cells of its natural host have not been performed. To address the apparent contradiction between the presence of a structurally conserved Il10 homolog in the genome of CyHV-3 and the lack of a clear phenotype in vivo using recombinant cyhv3Il10-deleted viruses, we used an in vitro approach to investigate in detail whether cyhv3Il10 exerts any biological activity on carp cells. In this study, we provide direct evidence that cyhv3Il10 is biologically active and, similarly to carp Il10, signals via a conserved Stat3 pathway modulating immune cells of its natural host, carp. In vitro, cyhv3Il10 deactivates phagocytes with a prominent effect on macrophages, while also promoting proliferation of Igm(+) B cells and memory T cells. Collectively, this study demonstrates a clear biological activity of cyhv3Il10 on cells of its natural host and indicates that cyhv3Il10 is a true viral ortholog of carp Il10. Furthermore, to our knowledge, this is the first report on biological activities of a nonmammalian viral Il10 homolog.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.1500926DOI Listing
October 2015

Identification of a CD4 T cell epitope in the pneumonia virus of mice glycoprotein and characterization of its role in protective immunity.

Virology 2007 Nov 16;368(1):17-25. Epub 2007 Jul 16.

Division of Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) causes bronchiolitis and pneumonia in mice. Infection is associated with high levels of viral replication in the lungs and results in the functional inactivation of pulmonary virus-specific CD8 T cells. Due to its similarity to severe human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, PVM infection in mice has been proposed as an alternative RSV model. Here, we have delineated the minimal requirements for protective T cell immunity in the PVM model. Immunization with a CD8 T cell epitope from the PVM phosphoprotein P, combined with the ovalbumin (OVA) CD4 T cell epitope, did not confer protective immunity against lethal PVM challenge, suggesting a possible role of cognate CD4 T cell immunity. To determine the role of PVM-specific CD4 T cell responses, we mapped a PVM CD4 T cell epitope in the glycoprotein G, using a panel of overlapping peptides. Although immunization with this epitope provided some protection, solid protective immunity was only observed after immunization with a combination of the PVM-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell epitopes. Analysis of post-challenge T cell responses in immunized mice indicated that G-specific pulmonary CD4 T cells displayed a mixed Th1/Th2 phenotype, which was characterized by the presence of both IL-5 and IFN-gamma secreting cells, in the absence of overt pathology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2007.06.002DOI Listing
November 2007