Publications by authors named "Edwin B Corgiat"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The RNA-binding protein Nab2 regulates the proteome of the developing Drosophila brain.

J Biol Chem 2021 Jun 15;297(1):100877. Epub 2021 Jun 15.

Department of Cell Biology, Emory University School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Electronic address:

The human ZC3H14 gene, which encodes a ubiquitously expressed polyadenosine zinc finger RNA-binding protein, is mutated in an inherited form of autosomal recessive, nonsyndromic intellectual disability. To gain insight into neurological functions of ZC3H14, we previously developed a Drosophila melanogaster model of ZC3H14 loss by deleting the fly ortholog, Nab2. Studies in this invertebrate model revealed that Nab2 controls final patterns of neuron projection within fully developed adult brains, but the role of Nab2 during development of the Drosophila brain is not known. Here, we identify roles for Nab2 in controlling the dynamic growth of axons in the developing brain mushroom bodies, which support olfactory learning and memory, and regulating abundance of a small fraction of the total brain proteome. The group of Nab2-regulated brain proteins, identified by quantitative proteomic analysis, includes the microtubule-binding protein Futsch, the neuronal Ig-family transmembrane protein turtle, the glial:neuron adhesion protein contactin, the Rac GTPase-activating protein tumbleweed, and the planar cell polarity factor Van Gogh, which collectively link Nab2 to the processes of brain morphogenesis, neuroblast proliferation, circadian sleep/wake cycles, and synaptic development. Overall, these data indicate that Nab2 controls the abundance of a subset of brain proteins during the active process of wiring the pupal brain mushroom body and thus provide a window into potentially conserved functions of the Nab2/ZC3H14 RNA-binding proteins in neurodevelopment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbc.2021.100877DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8260979PMC
June 2021

Understanding Aspects of Aluminum Exposure in Alzheimer's Disease Development.

Brain Pathol 2016 Mar 8;26(2):139-54. Epub 2015 Dec 8.

Department of Biochemistry, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

Aluminum is a ubiquitously abundant nonessential element. Aluminum has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and dialysis encephalopathy. Many continue to regard aluminum as controversial although increasing evidence supports the implications of aluminum in the pathogenesis of AD. Aluminum causes the accumulation of tau protein and Aβ protein in the brain of experimental animals. Aluminum induces neuronal apoptosis in vivo and in vitro, either by endoplasmic stress from the unfolded protein response, by mitochondrial dysfunction, or a combination of them. Some, people who are exposed chronically to aluminum, either from through water and/or food, have not shown any AD pathology, apparently because their gastrointestinal barrier is more effective. This article is written keeping in mind mechanisms of action of aluminum neurotoxicity with respect to AD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bpa.12333DOI Listing
March 2016