Publications by authors named "Edward P Nord"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

5 Years Experience With Drug Eluting and Bare Metal Stents as Primary Intervention in Transplant Renal Artery Stenosis.

Transplant Direct 2017 Feb 17;3(2):e128. Epub 2017 Jan 17.

Divisions of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY.

Background: Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a common vascular complication after kidney transplantation and is associated with refractory hypertension, volume overload, and graft injury or loss. This article describes 5-year outcomes of endovascular intervention for TRAS with bare metal and drug eluting stents (DES).

Methods: We investigated, as a prospective cohort study, patient and graft outcomes after the targeted use of DES for vessel diameter less than 5 mm and bare metal stents (BMS) for vessel diameter greater than 5 mm as the primary management for TRAS.

Results: From March 2008 to November 2014, 57 patients were stented for hemodynamically significant TRAS; 29 received DES, 26 received BMS, and 2 patients received both stent types. They were followed up for a mean of 35.1 ± 22.8 months; a subset of these patients who all received DES were followed up for 61.7 ± 17.5 months. Mean serum creatinine declined from 2.87 ± 1.5 mg/dL at the time of intervention to 1.98 ± 0.76 mg/dL ( < 0.001) at one month follow-up and was 1.96 ±0.92 mg/dL ( < 0.001) at 35.1 ± 22.8 months. Mean systolic blood pressure declined from 159.05 ± 19.68 mm Hg at time of intervention to 135.65 ± 15.10 mm Hg ( < 0.001) at most recent visit. Clinically driven restenosis requiring repeat revascularization occurred in 15.7% of patients.

Conclusions: Primary stenting with DES and BMS is both successful in the initial treatment of TRAS and also produced an immediate and long-term reduction in serum creatinine and systolic blood pressure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TXD.0000000000000643DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5367745PMC
February 2017

Krüppel-Like Factor 15 Mediates Glucocorticoid-Induced Restoration of Podocyte Differentiation Markers.

J Am Soc Nephrol 2017 Jan 10;28(1):166-184. Epub 2016 Jun 10.

Department of Pharmacology and Systems Therapeutics and.

Podocyte injury is the inciting event in primary glomerulopathies, such as minimal change disease and primary FSGS, and glucocorticoids remain the initial and often, the primary treatment of choice for these glomerulopathies. Because inflammation is not readily apparent in these diseases, understanding the direct effects of glucocorticoids on the podocyte, independent of the immunomodulatory effects, may lead to the identification of targets downstream of glucocorticoids that minimize toxicity without compromising efficacy. Several studies showed that treatment with glucocorticoids restores podocyte differentiation markers and normal ultrastructure and improves cell survival in murine podocytes. We previously determined that Krüppel-like factor 15 (KLF15), a kidney-enriched zinc finger transcription factor, is required for restoring podocyte differentiation markers in mice and human podocytes under cell stress. Here, we show that in vitro treatment with dexamethasone induced a rapid increase of KLF15 expression in human and murine podocytes and enhanced the affinity of glucocorticoid receptor binding to the promoter region of KLF15 In three independent proteinuric murine models, podocyte-specific loss of Klf15 abrogated dexamethasone-induced podocyte recovery. Furthermore, knockdown of KLF15 reduced cell survival and destabilized the actin cytoskeleton in differentiated human podocytes. Conversely, overexpression of KLF15 stabilized the actin cytoskeleton under cell stress in human podocytes. Finally, the level of KLF15 expression in the podocytes and glomeruli from human biopsy specimens correlated with glucocorticoid responsiveness in 35 patients with minimal change disease or primary FSGS. Thus, these studies identify the critical role of KLF15 in mediating the salutary effects of glucocorticoids in the podocyte.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1681/ASN.2015060672DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5198263PMC
January 2017

Arteriojejunal Fistula Presenting with Recurrent Obscure GI Hemorrhage in a Patient with a Failed Pancreas Allograft.

Case Rep Transplant 2013 25;2013:171807. Epub 2013 Dec 25.

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA.

We present a case of a patient with a failed pancreaticoduodenal allograft with exocrine enteric-drainage who developed catastrophic gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage. Over the course of a week, she presented with recurrent GI bleeds of obscure etiology. Multiple esophago-gastro-duodenoscopic (EGD) and colonoscopic evaluations failed to reveal the source of the hemorrhage. A capsule endoscopy and a technetium-labeled red blood cells (RBC) imaging study were similarly unrevealing for source of bleeding. She subsequently developed hemorrhagic shock requiring emergent superior mesenteric arteriography. Run off images revealed an external iliac artery aneurysm with fistulization into the jejunum. Coiled embolization was attempted but abandoned because of hemodynamic instability. Deployment of a covered endovascular stent into the right external iliac artery over the fistula site resulted in immediate hemodynamic stabilization. A high index of suspicion for arterioenteric fistulae is needed for diagnosis of this uncommon but eminently treatable form of GI hemorrhage in this patient population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/171807DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3886212PMC
January 2014

Reversible left ventricular dysfunction and acute kidney injury in a patient with nonamyloid light chain deposition disease.

Clin Nephrol 2012 Dec;78(6):501-5

Divisions of Nephrology, Cardiology, Oncology, Department of Medicine and Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA.

Non-amyloid light chain deposition disease (LCDD) is a rare entity that most commonly presents as proteinuria and/or renal dysfunction. We report on a patient who initially presented with acutely decompensated heart failure and subsequently developed nephrotic range proteinuria with attendant advanced renal dysfunction. The diagnosis of LCCD was made on renal biopsy.She was treated with five cycles of bortezomib and dexamethasone followed by cyclophosphamide priming for peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization and auto logousstem cell transplant (ASCT). Four years later, she remains in very good partial response (VGPR) with a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 58% and serum creatinine of 1.1 mg/dl. This observation supports the approach of aggressive management of patients with LCDD who have multiple organ failure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5414/cn107347DOI Listing
December 2012

Intestinal infarction and portal vein thrombosis in a patient with henoch schonlein purpura.

Case Rep Rheumatol 2012 14;2012:672959. Epub 2012 Oct 14.

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA.

Henoch Schonlein purpura is a systemic vasculitis that commonly affects children and teenagers but also affects adults of all ages. In most instances it has a benign course. Organ involvement, particularly in adults, and notably the kidneys and gastrointestinal tract may require therapeutic intervention and may have a less favorable outcome. We report a case of a 58-year-old man who presented with purpura and who rapidly developed catastrophic intestinal vasculitis, leading to his demise.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/672959DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3477656PMC
October 2012

Retroperitoneal mass in a patient with Wegener's granulomatosis.

Clin Nephrol 2012 Mar;77(3):237-41

Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, School of Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA.

Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a necrotizing vasculitis that classically involves the upper and lower respiratory tracts and kidneys. Uncommonly, other sites may also be involved. We report on a patient previously diagnosed with and treated for WG who presented with flank pain and on further imaging was found to have a retroperitoneal mass. A surgical specimen of the tissue revealed multiple foci of necrotizing vasculitis. Consideration should be given to the possibility that mass-like lesions in patients with WG may not be tumors since the management and outcome differ from that of an active vasculitis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5414/cn106908DOI Listing
March 2012

Quiz page: acute kidney injury secondary to bilateral ureteral obstruction.

Am J Kidney Dis 2010 Aug;56(2):A33-5

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook, NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.ajkd.2009.09.016DOI Listing
August 2010

IL-8 amplifies CD40/CD154-mediated ICAM-1 production via the CXCR-1 receptor and p38-MAPK pathway in human renal proximal tubule cells.

Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 2009 Feb 30;296(2):F438-45. Epub 2008 Jul 30.

Department of Medicine, Div. of Nephrology, School of Medicine, HSC T-16 Rm-080, State Univ. of NY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA.

Activation of the CD40 receptor by its cognate ligand, CD154, results in interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) production and increased intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression in proximal tubule cells (PTCs). The independent role of these two proinflammatory chemokines, IL-8 and MCP-1, in inciting an inflammatory response in PTCs was explored. Exposure of primary cultures of human renal PTCs to recombinant IL-8 and MCP-1 resulted in increased ICAM-1 expression measured by quantitative real-time PCR, but confirmed only for IL-8 by immunoblot. The mechanism of action of IL-8 was explored in further detail. Immunohistochemistry identified both the CXCR-1 and CXCR-2 receptors, confirmed by RT-PCR, immunoprecipitation, immunoblot, and FACS analysis. IL-8 increased ICAM-1 expression only via the CXCR-1 receptor, which in turn resulted in activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway; neither the extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) 1/2 MAPK pathway nor the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK)/c-Jun NH(2) terminal kinase (JNK) pathway was involved. CD154/CD40-mediated ICAM-1 upregulation was not affected by preincubation of monolayers with the CXCR-1 blocking antibody, indicating that ICAM-1 expression occurs independent of CD154-mediated IL-8 production. Coincubation of monolayers with both CD154 and IL-8 resulted in a greater ICAM-1 response than either compound alone. We conclude that in human renal PTCs, IL-8 upregulates ICAM-1 production by engaging the CXCR-1 receptor and p38 MAPK signaling pathway. This cascade of events is independent of CD40/CD154-mediated IL-8 stimulation and ICAM-1 production and serves to amplify the inflammatory response.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajprenal.90214.2008DOI Listing
February 2009

CD40/CD154 ligation induces mononuclear cell adhesion to human renal proximal tubule cells via increased ICAM-1 expression.

Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 2005 Jul 15;289(1):F145-53. Epub 2005 Feb 15.

Division of Nephrology, Dept. of Medicine, School of Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA.

The role of CD40/CD154 ligation in the upregulation of genes of the proinflammatory nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signal transduction pathway was explored in primary cultures of human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells. Using a cDNA gene array specific for human NF-kappaB signal pathway genes, 38 genes were upregulated at 1 h, and 7 of these genes remained upregulated at 3 h. Of these genes, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was explored in further detail. Quantitative real-time PCR for ICAM-1 mRNA expression confirmed the gene array findings. Western blot analysis and quantitative sandwich-enzyme ELISA confirmed this observation at the protein level. A cell-surface ELISA assay showed that ICAM-1 expression doubled by 48 h of CD154 exposure, and fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis suggested that both the number of cells expressing ICAM-1 and the expression of ICAM-1 on these cells had increased. A cell adhesion assay using fluorescein-labeled human peripheral mononuclear cells showed that ICAM-1 upregulation resulted in increased mononuclear cell adhesion to the monolayer, which was abrogated by pretreatment of the monolayer with a neutralizing ICAM-1 antibody. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor SB-203580 but not the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 inhibitor (PD-98059) nor the protein kinase C inhibitor (calphostin) blunted ICAM-1 expression and mononuclear cell adhesion to the monolayer. We conclude that, in human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, CD40 activation upregulates ICAM-1 (and other NF-kappaB pathway genes) expression with concomitant enhanced adhesion of mononuclear cells, which is mediated via the p38 MAPK signal transduction pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajprenal.00317.2004DOI Listing
July 2005

Fenofibrate-associated reversible acute allograft dysfunction in 3 renal transplant recipients: biopsy evidence of tubular toxicity.

Am J Kidney Dis 2004 Sep;44(3):543-50

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA.

Renal transplant recipients are susceptible to hyperlipidemia and the development of atherosclerosis as a consequence of the immunosuppressive agents they require, which include corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and sirolimus. Fibric acid derivatives and 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors are prescribed commonly to optimize lipid profiles and reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in this type of setting. The authors describe 3 cases of reversible acute renal allograft dysfunction in patients treated with fenofibrate. Serum levels of monitored immunosuppressant agents remained therapeutic throughout the time period. Discontinuation of the fenofibrate resulted in the resolution of renal dysfunction. The pathologic changes to the proximal tubules in all 3 biopsy specimens were in keeping with a toxic rather than an ischemic etiology. Although the control of hyperlipidemia is crucial in the transplant patient population, the authors suggest that caution be exercised and serum creatinine levels be closely monitored in patients started on fibrates.
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September 2004

Functional caveolae are a prerequisite for CD40 signaling in human renal proximal tubule cells.

Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 2004 Apr 9;286(4):F711-9. Epub 2003 Dec 9.

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine,State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA.

The role of caveolae in CD40/CD154 activation of proinflammatory chemokines and their potential role in renal inflammatory disease were explored in primary cultures of human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells. With the use of a cell fractionation assay, caveolin-1 (Cav-1), the defining structural protein of caveolae, was detected exclusively in the cell membrane (detergent insoluble) component of resting and CD40-activated cells. In the unstimulated condition, CD40 was associated with Cav-1, and with activation of the receptor by its cognate ligand CD154, CD40 disassociated from Cav-1. Other previously identified components of the CD40 signaling pathway, namely, SAPK/JNK, p38, and ERK1/2 MAPKs, but not tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF-6), were also present within caveolae and dissociated from this structure with ligation of the CD40 receptor. Disruption of caveolae with filipin diminished CD40-mediated MAPK activation and blunted downstream monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and IL-8 production. Similarly, dislodgment of signaling proteins from their scaffolding with a peptide targeted to the Cav-1 scaffolding domain (CSD) resulted in blunted MAPK activation and augmented IL-8 and MCP-1 production. In contrast, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGF receptor and activation of ERK1/2 were not interrupted by the peptide. We conclude that in human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, CD40 and its downstream MAPK signaling proteins are located in membrane rafts and that disruption of caveolae or dislodgment of signaling proteins from the CSD diminishes MAPK activation and IL-8 and MCP-1 production in these cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajprenal.00308.2003DOI Listing
April 2004

CD40 ligation stimulates MCP-1 and IL-8 production, TRAF6 recruitment, and MAPK activation in proximal tubule cells.

Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 2002 Jun;282(6):F1020-33

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA.

The mechanism of CD40/CD154-induced chemokine production and its potential role in renal inflammatory disease were explored. Human proximal tubule cells maintained in primary culture were used as the experimental model. With the use of immunocytochemistry, confocal microscopy, and a cell fractionation assay, the CD40 receptor was found to be expressed in the cell membrane of the epithelial cell, and, on engagement by CD154, its cognate ligand, translocated to the cytoplasmic compartment. Engagement of CD40 by CD154 stimulated interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) production, which proceeded via receptor activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK)/c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. CD40 ligation also engaged tumor necrosis factor receptor-activating factor 6 (TRAF6), as evidenced by colocalization of the activated receptor with TRAF6 in the cytoplasmic compartment, translocation of both proteins from the insoluble to the soluble cell fraction, and coimmunoprecipitation of the two proteins only under ligand-stimulated conditions. Furthermore, an antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide targeted against TRAF6 mRNA blunted p38 and SAPK/JNK but not ERK1/2 MAPK activities, as well as IL-8 and MCP-1 production, arguing that TRAF6 is an upstream activator. The zinc chelator TPEN, but not the calcium chelator BAPTA, obliterated CD154-evoked MAPK activity and chemokine production, providing indirect evidence for protein-protein interactions playing a critical role in CD40 signaling in these cells. We conclude that in human proximal tubule cells, CD40 and TRAF6 reside in separate low-density, detergent-insoluble membrane microdomains, or rafts, and on activation translocate and associate with one another probably via zinc-finger domains in the soluble or cytoplasmic compartment. TRAF6, in turn, activates SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, which in turn stimulates IL-8 and MCP-1 production in these cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajprenal.00291.2001DOI Listing
June 2002