Publications by authors named "Edward Hollingsworth"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Development of an insect-cell-based assay for detection of kinase inhibition using NF-kappaB-inducing kinase as a paradigm.

Biochem J 2009 Apr;419(1):65-73

Biological Reagents & Assay Development, GlaxoSmithKline R&D, New Frontiers Science Park, Third Avenue, Harlow, Essex, CM19 5AW, UK.

Identification of small-molecule inhibitors by high-throughput screening necessitates the development of robust, reproducible and cost-effective assays. The assay approach adopted may utilize isolated proteins or whole cells containing the target of interest. To enable protein-based assays, the baculovirus expression system is commonly used for generation and isolation of recombinant proteins. We have applied the baculovirus system into a cell-based assay format using NIK [NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB)-inducing kinase] as a paradigm. We illustrate the use of the insect-cell-based assay in monitoring the activity of NIK against its physiological downstream substrate IkappaB (inhibitor of NF-kappaB) kinase-1. The assay was robust, yielding a signal/background ratio of 2:1 and an average Z' value of >0.65 when used to screen a focused compound set. Using secondary assays to validate a selection of the hits, we identified a compound that (i) was non-cytotoxic, (ii) interacted directly with NIK, and (iii) inhibited lymphotoxin-induced NF-kappaB p52 translocation to the nucleus. The insect cell assay represents a novel approach to monitoring kinase inhibition, with major advantages over other cell-based systems including ease of use, amenability to scale-up, protein expression levels and the flexibility to express a number of proteins by infecting with numerous baculoviruses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1042/BJ20081646DOI Listing
April 2009

Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a fungal hydrolase from Ophiostoma novo-ulmi.

Acta Crystallogr D Biol Crystallogr 2004 Oct 23;60(Pt 10):1879-82. Epub 2004 Sep 23.

Henry Wellcome Building for Biocatalysis, School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QD, England.

Dutch elm disease fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi contains a hydrolase activity which catalyses the resolution of racemic ethyl naproxen to the corresponding acid. The recombinant enzyme has been crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method in two crystal forms. The crystals of the first form belong to space group P2(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 115.9, b = 174.4, c = 62.1 A. The enzyme also crystallizes in space group P2(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.9, b = 212.7, c = 61.7 A. Synchrotron data have been collected for both crystal forms to 2.6 and 2.3 A, respectively. A molecular-replacement solution has been found using a remote starting model of a bacterial esterase (23% sequence identity) for both crystal forms. Multicrystal averaging has resulted in interpretable electron-density maps.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1107/S0907444904018153DOI Listing
October 2004

A thermostable L-aminoacylase from Thermococcus litoralis: cloning, overexpression, characterization, and applications in biotransformations.

Extremophiles 2002 Apr;6(2):111-22

School of Chemistry, University of Exeter, UK.

A thermostable L-aminoacylase from Thermococcus litoralis was cloned, sequenced, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme is a homotetramer of 43 kDa monomers and has an 82% sequence identity to an aminoacylase from Pyrococcus horikoshii and 45% sequence identity to a carboxypeptidase from Sulfolobus solfataricus. It contains one cysteine residue that is highly conserved among aminoacylases. Cell-free extracts of the recombinant enzyme were characterized and were found to have optimal activity at 85 degrees C in Tris-HCl at pH 8.0. The recombinant enzyme is thermostable, with a half-life of 25 h at 70 degrees C. Aminoacylase inhibitors, such as mono-tert-butyl malonate, had only a slight effect on activity. The enzyme was partially inhibited by EDTA and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, suggesting that the cysteine residue and a metal ion are important, but not essential, for activity. Addition of Zn2+ and Co2+ to the apoenzyme increased the enzyme activity, whereas Sn4+ and Cu2+ almost completely abolished enzyme activity. The enzyme was most specific for substrates containing N-benzoyl- or N-chloroacetyl-amino acids. preferring substrates containing hydrophobic, uncharged, or weakly charged amino acids such as phenylalanine, methionine, and cysteine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s007920100230DOI Listing
April 2002

Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of L-aminoacylase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis.

Acta Crystallogr D Biol Crystallogr 2002 Mar 21;58(Pt 3):507-10. Epub 2002 Feb 21.

School of Chemistry, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD, England.

The enzyme L-aminoacylase catalyses the hydrolysis of N-acyl-L-amino acids from peptides or proteins. The recombinant enzyme from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis has been purified to homogeneity. This zinc-containing enzyme has been crystallized from ammonium sulfate using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffract to 2.8 A resolution and belong to the rhombohedral space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 102.4, c = 178.5 A, gamma = 120 degrees in a hexagonal lattice setting. The asymmetric unit contains one enzyme monomer, containing a single zinc ion. Two synchrotron data sets have been collected at a remote wavelength and at the maximum f'wavelength for zinc. This has allowed the position of the metal to be identified in anomalous Patterson maps.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1107/s0907444901021266DOI Listing
March 2002