Publications by authors named "Edeline Gagnon"

6 Publications

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Plastome evolution in the Caesalpinia group (Leguminosae) and its application in phylogenomics and populations genetics.

Planta 2021 Jul 8;254(2):27. Epub 2021 Jul 8.

Laboratory of Plant Cytogenetics and Evolution, Department of Botany, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil.

Main Conclusion: The chloroplast genomes of Caesalpinia group species are structurally conserved, but sequence level variation is useful for both phylogenomic and population genetic analyses. Variation in chloroplast genomes (plastomes) has been an important source of information in plant biology. The Caesalpinia group has been used as a model in studies correlating ecological and genomic variables, yet its intergeneric and infrageneric relationships are not fully solved, despite densely sampled phylogenies including nuclear and plastid loci by Sanger sequencing. Here, we present the de novo assembly and characterization of plastomes from 13 species from the Caesalpinia group belonging to eight genera. A comparative analysis was carried out with 13 other plastomes previously available, totalizing 26 plastomes and representing 15 of the 26 known Caesalpinia group genera. All plastomes showed a conserved quadripartite structure and gene repertoire, except for the loss of four ndh genes in Erythrostemon gilliesii. Thirty polymorphic regions were identified for inter- or intrageneric analyses. The 26 aligned plastomes were used for phylogenetic reconstruction, revealing a well-resolved topology, and dividing the Caesalpinia group into two fully supported clades. Sixteen microsatellite (cpSSR) loci were selected from Cenostigma microphyllum for primer development and at least two were cross-amplified in different Leguminosae subfamilies by in vitro or in silico approaches. Four loci were used to assess the genetic diversity of C. microphyllum in the Brazilian Caatinga. Our results demonstrate the structural conservation of plastomes in the Caesalpinia group, offering insights into its systematics and evolution, and provides new genomic tools for future phylogenetic, population genetics, and phylogeographic studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00425-021-03655-8DOI Listing
July 2021

How diverse is heterochromatin in the Caesalpinia group? Cytogenomic characterization of Erythrostemon hughesii Gagnon & G.P. Lewis (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae).

Planta 2020 Sep 12;252(4):49. Epub 2020 Sep 12.

Laboratory of Plant Cytogenetics and Evolution, Department of Botany, Federal University of Pernambuco, Rua Nelson Chaves S/N, Cidade Universitaria, Recife, PE, 50670-420, Brazil.

Main Conclusion: Cytogenomic characterization of Erythrostemon hughesii reveals a heterogeneity of repeats in its subtelomeric heterochromatin. Comparative analyses with other Caesalpinia group species reveal a significant reduction in the abundance of Ty3-gypsy/Chromovirus Tekay retrotransposons during its evolution. In numerically stable karyotypes, repetitive DNA variability is one of the main causes of genome and chromosome variation and evolution. Species from the Caesalpinia group (Leguminosae) are karyotypically characterized by 2n = 24, with small chromosomes and highly variable CMA heterochromatin banding patterns that correlate with environmental variables. Erythrostemon hughesii differs from other species of the group examined to date for having subtelomeric CMA bands; this contrasts with most species in the group which have proximal bands. Here we analyse the repeatome of E. hughesii using genome skimming and chromosomal mapping approaches to characterize the identity of the most abundant repetitive elements and their physical location. The repetitive fraction of E. hughesii comprises 28.73% of the genome. The most abundant elements were retrotransposons (RT) with long terminal repeats (LTR-RT; 9.76%) and satellite DNAs (7.83%). Within the LTR-RTs, the most abundant lineages were: Ty1/copia-Ale (1%), Ty3/gypsy CRM (0.88%) and Ty3/gypsy Athila (0.75%). Using fluorescent in situ hybridization four satellite DNAs and several LTR-RT elements were shown to be present in most subtelomeric CMA bands. These results highlight how the repeatome in E. hughesii, a species from Oaxaca state in Mexico, is clearly distinct from Northeast Brazilian species of the Caesalpinia group, mainly due to its high diversity of repeats in its subtelomeric heterochromatic bands and low amount of LTR-RT Ty3/gypsy-Tekay elements. Comparative sequence analysis of Tekay elements from different species is congruent with a clade-specific origin of this LTR-RT after the divergence of the Caesalpinia group. We hypothesize that repeat-rich heterochromatin may play a role in leading to faster genomic divergence between individuals, increasing speciation and diversification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00425-020-03453-8DOI Listing
September 2020

Evolutionary convergence or homology? Comparative cytogenomics of Caesalpinia group species (Leguminosae) reveals diversification in the pericentromeric heterochromatic composition.

Planta 2019 Dec 6;250(6):2173-2186. Epub 2019 Nov 6.

Laboratory of Plant Cytogenetics and Evolution, Department of Botany, Federal University of Pernambuco, Rua Nelson Chaves S/N, Cidade Universitária, Recife, PE, 50670-420, Brazil.

Main Conclusion: We demonstrated by cytogenomic analysis that the proximal heterochromatin of the Northeast Brazilian species of Caesalpinia group is enriched with phylogenetically conserved Ty3/Gypsy-Tekay RT, but diverge in the presence of Ty3/Gypsy-Athila RT and satDNA. The Caesalpinia Group includes 225 species and 27 monophyletic genera of which four occur in Northeastern Brazil: Erythrostemon (1 sp.), Cenostigma (7 spp.), Libidibia (1 sp.), and Paubrasilia (1 sp.). The last three genera are placed in different clades in the Caesalpinia Group phylogeny, and yet they are characterized by having a numerically stable karyotype 2n = 24 (16 M+8A) and GC-rich heterochromatic bands (chromomycin A positive/CMA bands) in the proximal chromosome regions. To characterize the composition of their heterochromatin and test for the homology of these chromosomal regions, genomic DNA was extracted from Cenostigma microphyllum, Libidibia ferrea, and Paubrasilia echinata, and sequenced at low coverage using the Illumina platform. The genomic repetitive fractions were characterized using a Galaxy/RepeatExplorer-Elixir platform. The most abundant elements of each genome were chromosomally located by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and compared to the CMA heterochromatin distribution. The repetitive fraction of the genomes of C. microphyllum, L. ferrea, and P. echinata were estimated to be 41.70%, 38.44%, and 72.51%, respectively. Ty3/Gypsy retrotransposons (RT), specifically the Tekay lineage, were the most abundant repeats in each of the three genomes. FISH mapping revealed species-specific patterns for the Tekay elements in the proximal regions of the chromosomes, co-localized with CMA bands. Other species-specific patterns were observed, e.g., for the Ty3/Gypsy RT Athila elements which were found in all the proximal heterochromatin of L. ferrea or restricted to the acrocentric chromosomes of C. microphyllum. This Athila labeling co-localized with satellite DNAs (satDNAs). Although the Caesalpinia Group diverged around 55 Mya, our results suggest an ancestral colonization of Tekay RT in the proximal heterochromatin. Thus, the present-day composition of the pericentromeric heterochromatin in these Northeast Brazilian species is a combination of the maintenance of an ancestral Tekay distribution with a species-specific accumulation of other repeats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00425-019-03287-zDOI Listing
December 2019

Global Succulent Biome phylogenetic conservatism across the pantropical Caesalpinia Group (Leguminosae).

New Phytol 2019 06 14;222(4):1994-2008. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Department of Systematic & Evolutionary Botany, University of Zurich, Zollikerstrasse 107, 8008, Zurich, Switzerland.

The extent to which phylogenetic biome conservatism vs biome shifting determines global patterns of biodiversity remains poorly understood. To address this question, we investigated the biogeography and trajectories of biome and growth form evolution across the Caesalpinia Group (Leguminosae), a clade of 225 species of trees, shrubs and lianas distributed across the Rainforest, Succulent, Temperate and Savanna Biomes. We focused especially on the little-known Succulent Biome, an assemblage of succulent-rich, grass-poor, seasonally dry tropical vegetation distributed disjunctly across the Neotropics, Africa, Arabia and Madagascar. We reconstructed a time-calibrated phylogeny, assembled species occurrence data and assigned species to areas, biomes and growth forms. These data are used to estimate the frequency of transcontinental disjunctions, biome shifts and evolutionary transitions between growth forms and test for phylogenetic biome conservatism and correlated evolution of growth forms and biome shifts. We uncovered a pattern of strong phylogenetic Succulent Biome conservatism. We showed that transcontinental disjunctions confined within the Succulent Biome are frequent and that biome shifts to the Savanna, Rainforest and Temperate Biomes are infrequent and closely associated with shifts in plant growth forms. Our results suggest that the Succulent Biome comprises an ecologically constrained evolutionary arena spanning large geographical disjunctions across the tropics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nph.15633DOI Listing
June 2019

A new generic system for the pantropical Caesalpinia group (Leguminosae).

PhytoKeys 2016 12(71):1-160. Epub 2016 Oct 12.

Comparative Plant and Fungal Biology Department, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 3AB, United Kingdom.

The Caesalpinia group is a large pantropical clade of ca. 205 species in subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Leguminosae) in which generic delimitation has been in a state of considerable flux. Here we present new phylogenetic analyses based on five plastid and one nuclear ribosomal marker, with dense taxon sampling including 172 (84%) of the species and representatives of all previously described genera in the Caesalpinia group. These analyses show that the current classification of the Caesalpinia group into 21 genera needs to be revised. Several genera (, , and sensu Lewis, 2005) are non-monophyletic and several previously unclassified Asian species segregate into clades that merit recognition at generic rank. In addition, the near-completeness of our taxon sampling identifies three species that do not belong in any of the main clades and these are recognised as new monospecific genera. A new generic classification of the Caesalpinia group is presented including a key for the identification of genera, full generic descriptions, illustrations (drawings and photo plates of all genera), and (for most genera) the nomenclatural transfer of species to their correct genus. We recognise 26 genera, with reinstatement of two previously described genera ( Tod., R. Vig.), re-delimitation and expansion of several others (, , and ), contraction of s.s. and description of four new ones (, , and ), and make 75 new nomenclatural combinations in this new generic system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.71.9203DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5558824PMC
October 2016

A multilocus phylogenetic analysis reveals the monophyly of a recircumscribed papilionoid legume tribe Diocleae with well-supported generic relationships.

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2015 Sep 28;90:1-19. Epub 2015 Apr 28.

Smithsonian Institution, 10th and Constitution Ave, Washington, DC 20013-7012, USA.

Deciphering the phylogenetic relationships within the species-rich Millettioid clade has persisted as one of the major challenges in the systematics and evolutionary history of papilionoid legumes (Leguminosae, Papilionoideae). Historically, the predominantly neotropical lianas of subtribe Diocleinae in the Millettioid legumes have been taxonomically tangled together with the largely heterogeneous tribe Phaseoleae. This work presents a comprehensive molecular phylogenetic analysis based on nuclear and chloroplast markers and includes all genera ever referred to Diocleae except for the monospecific Philippine Luzonia, resolving several key generic relationships within the Millettioid legumes. The first of two separate analyses includes 310 matK accessions and strongly supports the reestablishment of tribe Diocleae as a branch of the Millettioid clade. This work sheds greater light on the higher-level phylogeny of Diocleae and allows the recognition of three major lineages: the Canavalia, Dioclea, and Galactia clades. The second set of phylogenetic analyses utilized nuclear (ITS/5.8S and ETS) and plastid (matK and trnT-Y) DNA sequences to reveal (i) the monophyly of Canavalia and Cleobulia; (ii) the monophyly of Bionia with the exclusion of Bionia bella; (iii) the paraphyly of Dioclea with respect to Cleobulia, Cymbosema, and Macropsychanthus; (iv) the paraphyly of Cratylia with respect to the broadly polyphyletic Camptosema; and (v) the polyphyly of Galactia with species scattered widely across the tree.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2015.04.016DOI Listing
September 2015
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