Publications by authors named "Ede A Rancz"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Viruses leave their stamp on single cells.

Nat Biotechnol 2018 01 18;36(1):42-44. Epub 2017 Dec 18.

Neurophysiology of Behaviour Laboratory, Francis Crick Institute, London, UK, and the Department of Neuroscience, Physiology & Pharmacology, University College London, London, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nbt.4043DOI Listing
January 2018

Widespread vestibular activation of the rodent cortex.

J Neurosci 2015 Apr;35(15):5926-34

Division of Neurophysiology, National Institute for Medical Research, London NW7 1AA, United Kingdom, Sainsbury Wellcome Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour, University College London, London W1T 4JG, United Kingdom

Much of our understanding of the neuronal mechanisms of spatial navigation is derived from chronic recordings in rodents in which head-direction, place, and grid cells have all been described. However, despite the proposed importance of self-reference information to these internal representations of space, their congruence with vestibular signaling remains unclear. Here we have undertaken brain-wide functional mapping using both fMRI and electrophysiological methods to directly determine the spatial extent, strength, and time course of vestibular signaling across the rat forebrain. We find distributed activity throughout thalamic, limbic, and particularly primary sensory cortical areas in addition to known head-direction pathways. We also observe activation of frontal regions, including infralimbic and cingulate cortices, indicating integration of vestibular information throughout functionally diverse cortical regions. These whole-brain activity maps therefore suggest a widespread contribution of vestibular signaling to a self-centered framework for multimodal sensorimotor integration in support of movement planning, execution, spatial navigation, and autonomic responses to gravito-inertial changes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1869-14.2015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4397593PMC
April 2015

The stimulus selectivity and connectivity of layer six principal cells reveals cortical microcircuits underlying visual processing.

Neuron 2014 Sep 28;83(6):1431-43. Epub 2014 Aug 28.

The Division of Neurophysiology, MRC National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA, UK; Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK. Electronic address:

Sensory computations performed in the neocortex involve layer six (L6) cortico-cortical (CC) and cortico-thalamic (CT) signaling pathways. Developing an understanding of the physiological role of these circuits requires dissection of the functional specificity and connectivity of the underlying individual projection neurons. By combining whole-cell recording from identified L6 principal cells in the mouse primary visual cortex (V1) with modified rabies virus-based input mapping, we have determined the sensory response properties and upstream monosynaptic connectivity of cells mediating the CC or CT pathway. We show that CC-projecting cells encompass a broad spectrum of selectivity to stimulus orientation and are predominantly innervated by deep layer V1 neurons. In contrast, CT-projecting cells are ultrasparse firing, exquisitely tuned to orientation and direction information, and receive long-range input from higher cortical areas. This segregation in function and connectivity indicates that L6 microcircuits route specific contextual and stimulus-related information within and outside the cortical network.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2014.08.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4175007PMC
September 2014

A biophysical signature of network affiliation and sensory processing in mitral cells.

Nature 2012 Aug;488(7411):375-8

Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK.

One defining characteristic of the mammalian brain is its neuronal diversity. For a given region, substructure, layer or even cell type, variability in neuronal morphology and connectivity persists. Although it is well known that such cellular properties vary considerably according to neuronal type, the substantial biophysical diversity of neurons of the same morphological class is typically averaged out and ignored. Here we show that the amplitude of hyperpolarization-evoked sag of membrane potential recorded in olfactory bulb mitral cells is an emergent, homotypic property of local networks and sensory information processing. Simultaneous whole-cell recordings from pairs of cells show that the amount of hyperpolarization-evoked sag potential and current (Ih) is stereotypic for mitral cells belonging to the same glomerular circuit. This is corroborated by a mosaic, glomerulus-based pattern of expression of the HCN2 (hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 2) subunit of the Ih channel. Furthermore, inter-glomerular differences in both membrane potential sag and HCN2 protein are diminished when sensory input to glomeruli is genetically and globally altered so that only one type of odorant receptor is universally expressed. Population diversity in this intrinsic property therefore reflects differential expression between local mitral cell networks processing distinct odour-related information.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11291DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3442227PMC
August 2012

Transfection via whole-cell recording in vivo: bridging single-cell physiology, genetics and connectomics.

Nat Neurosci 2011 Apr 20;14(4):527-32. Epub 2011 Feb 20.

Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, London, UK.

Single-cell genetic manipulation is expected to substantially advance the field of systems neuroscience. However, existing gene delivery techniques do not allow researchers to electrophysiologically characterize cells and to thereby establish an experimental link between physiology and genetics for understanding neuronal function. In the mouse brain in vivo, we found that neurons remained intact after 'blind' whole-cell recording, that DNA vectors could be delivered through the patch-pipette during such recordings and that these vectors drove protein expression in recorded cells for at least 7 d. To illustrate the utility of this approach, we recorded visually evoked synaptic responses in primary visual cortical cells while delivering DNA plasmids that allowed retrograde, monosynaptic tracing of each neuron's presynaptic inputs. By providing a biophysical profile of a cell before its specific genetic perturbation, this combinatorial method captures the synaptic and anatomical receptive field of a neuron.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nn.2765DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3501644PMC
April 2011

Dendritic spikes mediate negative synaptic gain control in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2010 Dec 3;107(51):22284-9. Epub 2010 Dec 3.

Research Department of Neuroscience, Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom.

Dendritic spikes appear to be a ubiquitous feature of dendritic excitability. In cortical pyramidal neurons, dendritic spikes increase the efficacy of distal synapses, providing additional inward current to enhance axonal action potential (AP) output, thus increasing synaptic gain. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, dendritic spikes can trigger synaptic plasticity, but their influence on axonal output is not well understood. We have used simultaneous somatic and dendritic patch-clamp recordings to directly assess the impact of dendritic calcium spikes on axonal AP output of Purkinje cells. Dendritic spikes evoked by parallel fiber input triggered brief bursts of somatic APs, followed by pauses in spiking, which cancelled out the extra spikes in the burst. As a result, average output firing rates during trains of input remained independent of the input strength, thus flattening synaptic gain. We demonstrate that this "clamping" of AP output by the pause following dendritic spikes is due to activation of high conductance calcium-dependent potassium channels by dendritic spikes. Dendritic spikes in Purkinje cells, in contrast to pyramidal cells, thus have differential effects on temporally coded and rate coded information: increasing the impact of transient parallel fiber input, while depressing synaptic gain for sustained parallel fiber inputs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1008605107DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3009819PMC
December 2010

Dendritic excitability and synaptic plasticity.

Physiol Rev 2008 Apr;88(2):769-840

Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research and Department of Physiology, University College London, London, United Kingdom.

Most synaptic inputs are made onto the dendritic tree. Recent work has shown that dendrites play an active role in transforming synaptic input into neuronal output and in defining the relationships between active synapses. In this review, we discuss how these dendritic properties influence the rules governing the induction of synaptic plasticity. We argue that the location of synapses in the dendritic tree, and the type of dendritic excitability associated with each synapse, play decisive roles in determining the plastic properties of that synapse. Furthermore, since the electrical properties of the dendritic tree are not static, but can be altered by neuromodulators and by synaptic activity itself, we discuss how learning rules may be dynamically shaped by tuning dendritic function. We conclude by describing how this reciprocal relationship between plasticity of dendritic excitability and synaptic plasticity has changed our view of information processing and memory storage in neuronal networks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/physrev.00016.2007DOI Listing
April 2008

High-fidelity transmission of sensory information by single cerebellar mossy fibre boutons.

Nature 2007 Dec;450(7173):1245-8

Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research and Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK.

Understanding the transmission of sensory information at individual synaptic connections requires knowledge of the properties of presynaptic terminals and their patterns of firing evoked by sensory stimuli. Such information has been difficult to obtain because of the small size and inaccessibility of nerve terminals in the central nervous system. Here we show, by making direct patch-clamp recordings in vivo from cerebellar mossy fibre boutons-the primary source of synaptic input to the cerebellar cortex-that sensory stimulation can produce bursts of spikes in single boutons at very high instantaneous firing frequencies (more than 700 Hz). We show that the mossy fibre-granule cell synapse exhibits high-fidelity transmission at these frequencies, indicating that the rapid burst of excitatory postsynaptic currents underlying the sensory-evoked response of granule cells can be driven by such a presynaptic spike burst. We also demonstrate that a single mossy fibre can trigger action potential bursts in granule cells in vitro when driven with in vivo firing patterns. These findings suggest that the relay from mossy fibre to granule cell can act in a 'detonator' fashion, such that a single presynaptic afferent may be sufficient to transmit the sensory message. This endows the cerebellar mossy fibre system with remarkable sensitivity and high fidelity in the transmission of sensory information.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature05995DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5881887PMC
December 2007

Dendritic patch-clamp recording.

Nat Protoc 2006 ;1(3):1235-47

Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research and Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK.

The patch-clamp technique allows investigation of the electrical excitability of neurons and the functional properties and densities of ion channels. Most patch-clamp recordings from neurons have been made from the soma, the largest structure of individual neurons, while their dendrites, which form the majority of the surface area and receive most of the synaptic input, have been relatively neglected. This protocol describes techniques for recording from the dendrites of neurons in brain slices under direct visual control. Although the basic technique is similar to that used for somatic patching, we describe refinements and optimizations of slice quality, microscope optics, setup stability and electrode approach that are required for maximizing the success rate for dendritic recordings. Using this approach, all configurations of the patch-clamp technique (cell-attached, inside-out, whole-cell, outside-out and perforated patch) can be achieved, even for relatively distal dendrites, and simultaneous multiple-electrode dendritic recordings are also possible. The protocol--from the beginning of slice preparation to the end of the first successful recording--can be completed in 3 h.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nprot.2006.164DOI Listing
June 2007

Dendritic calcium spikes are tunable triggers of cannabinoid release and short-term synaptic plasticity in cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

J Neurosci 2006 May;26(20):5428-37

Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, Department of Physiology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom.

Understanding the relationship between dendritic excitability and synaptic plasticity is vital for determining how dendrites regulate the input-output function of the neuron. Dendritic calcium spikes have been associated with the induction of long-term changes in synaptic efficacy. Here we use direct recordings from cerebellar Purkinje cell dendrites to show that synaptically activated local dendritic calcium spikes are potent triggers of cannabinoid release, producing a profound and short-term reduction in synaptic efficacy at parallel fiber synapses. Enhancing dendritic excitability by modulating dendritic large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels improves the spread of dendritic calcium spikes and enhances cannabinoid release at the expense of spatial specificity. Our findings reveal that dendritic calcium spikes provide a local and tunable coincidence detection mechanism that readjusts synaptic gain when synchronous activity reaches a threshold, and they reveal a tight link between the regulation of dendritic excitability and the induction of synaptic plasticity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5284-05.2006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5886360PMC
May 2006