Publications by authors named "Ebru Atasever Akkas"

7 Publications

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Prognostic value of systemic ımmune ınflammation ındex in patients with laryngeal cancer.

Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2021 Apr 9. Epub 2021 Apr 9.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty of Cumhuriyet University, Sivas, Turkey.

Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), the platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and the systemic immune-inflammation index (SII) with the clinical and pathological parameters of 118 laryngeal cancer patients, as well as their effects on the survival of the disease.

Methods: For the calculation of SII, PLR, and NLR, hemogram tests were conducted before treatment. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to calculate the cut-off value of SII, NLR, and PLR for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS).

Results: A statistically significant relationship was found between SII and lymphovascular invasion and between NLR and local recurrence, and lymphovascular invasion. In a univariate analysis, SII (p < 0.001) and NLR (p = 0.001) for OS and SII (p < 0.001), PLR (p = 0.043), and NLR (p < 0.001) for DFS were detected as prognostic factors. In a multivariate analysis for OS, SII (HR = 10.54, 95% CI 1.28-86.77; p = 0.029) and extracapsular extension (HR = 3.08, 95% CI 1.15-8.21; p = 0.024) were identified as independent prognostic factors. In a multivariate analysis for DFS, only an extracapsular extension presence (HR = 3.32, 95% CI 1.37-8.08; p = 0.008) was detected as an independent prognostic factor.

Conclusion: In laryngeal cancer, high SII values were determined as poor independent prognostic factors for OS. High SII, NLR, and PRL have been identified as poor prognostic factors in DFS. A correlation was found between NLR and local recurrence, and lymphovascular invasion and between SII with lymphovascular invasion positivity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00405-021-06798-2DOI Listing
April 2021

Improved disease-free survival with adjuvant radiotherapy in early-stage endometrial cancer: 10-year outcome analysis.

J Contemp Brachytherapy 2020 Dec 16;12(6):572-578. Epub 2020 Dec 16.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara Memorial Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term treatment outcomes and prognostic factors affecting survival of patients with early-stage endometrial carcinoma.

Material And Methods: Data of 311 patients with FIGO stage I-II endometrial cancer, curatively treated at two different tertiary centers between June 2001 and December 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients had primary surgery, 74 (24%) received no further treatment, 4 (1%) obtained chemotherapy only, 234 (75%) received radiotherapy, and 24 (7%) received both.

Results: Median follow-up time was 102 (range, 3-205) months. During this period, 68 (21.9%) patients died. 5-year and 10-year disease-free survival (DFS) were 76% and 74.3%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, lower uterine segment invasion positivity and no adjuvant radiotherapy were determined as independent unfavorable prognostic factors for DFS. The 5-year and 10-year disease-specific survival (DSS) were 86.8% and 82.2%, respectively. For DSS, high-grade, lymphovascular space invasion positivity, stage II, ≥ 65 age, and no adjuvant radiotherapy were found to be independent unfavorable prognostic markers.

Conclusions: The findings of our cohort have confirmed the importance of adjuvant radiotherapy on long-term early-stage endometrial carcinoma outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5114/jcb.2020.101690DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7787210PMC
December 2020

Stereotactic body radiotherapy in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer: Does beam-on time matter?

Jpn J Clin Oncol 2020 Sep;50(10):1182-1187

Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an effective treatment option for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we evaluated the treatment results using two different SBRT techniques and the effect of beam-on time (BOT) on treatment outcomes.

Methods: Between July 2007 and January 2018, 142 patients underwent SBRT for primary NSCLC. We have delivered SBRT using either respiratory tracking system (RTS) or internal-target-volume (ITV)-based motion management techniques. The effect of age, tumor size, pretreatment tumor SUVmax value, presence of tissue diagnosis, histopathological subtype, operability status, tumor location, motion management technique, BED10 value, BOT on overall survival (OS), loco-regional control (LRC), event-free survival (EFS) and primary tumor control (PTC) were evaluated.

Results: Median age of the patients was 70 years (range, 39-91 years). Most of the patients were inoperable (90%) at the time of SBRT. Median BED10 value was 112.5 Gy. With a median follow-up of 25 months, PTC was achieved in 91.5% of the patients. Two-year estimated OS, LRC, PTC and EFS rates were 68, 63, 63 and 53%, respectively. For the entire group, OS was associated with BOT (P = 0.027), and EFS was associated with BOT (P = 0.027) and tumor size (P = 0.015). For RTS group, OS was associated with age (P = 0.016), EFS with BOT (P = 0.05) and tumor size (P = 0.024), LRC with BOT (P = 0.008) and PTC with BOT (P = 0.028). The treatment was well tolerated in general.

Conclusion: SBRT is an effective and safe treatment with high OS, LRC, EFS and PTC rates in patients with primary NSCLC. Protracted BOT might deteriorate SBRT outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jjco/hyaa093DOI Listing
September 2020

Whole Brain Radiotherapy Combined with Stereotactic Radiosurgery versus Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone for Brain Metastases.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2015 ;16(17):7595-7

Radiation Oncology Department, Ankara Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey E-mail :

Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) combined with streotactic radiosurgery versus stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone for patients with brain metastases.

Materials And Methods: This was a retrospective study that evaluated the results of 46 patients treated for brain metastases at Dr. Abdurrahman Yurtaslan Ankara Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, between January 2012 and January 2015. Twenty-four patients were treated with WBRT+SRS while 22 patients were treated with only SRS.

Results: Time to local recurrence was 9.7 months in the WBRT+SRS arm and 8.3 months in SRS arm, the difference not being statistically significant (p= 0.7). Local recurrence rate was higher in the SRS alone arm but again without significance (p=0,06).

Conclusions: In selected patient group with limited number (one to four) of brain metastases SRS alone can be considered as a treatment option and WBRT may be omitted in the initial treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2015.16.17.7595DOI Listing
September 2016

The impact of radiotherapy on quality of life for cancer patients: a longitudinal study.

Support Care Cancer 2014 Sep 12;22(9):2479-87. Epub 2014 Apr 12.

Cumhuriyet University, Sivas, Turkey,

Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess for changes in quality of life (QOL) among cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy (RT) and to identify factors that influence QOL in this group.

Materials And Methods: Three hundred sixty-seven cancer patients who received curative RT were investigated using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire at the start of RT, end of RT, and 1 and 6 months post-RT.

Results: The patients were 49 % women, 51 % men, and median age at diagnosis was 57 years (range, 16-86 years). Compared to pre-RT, at the end of RT, the global health status score (p < 0.001), nausea/vomiting (p < 0.001), and apetite loss scores (p < 0.001) were significantly poorer. Compared to the end of RT, at 1 and 6 months post-RT, global health status, all functional, and all symptom scores were significantly improved (p < 0.001). Patient sex influenced scores for pain (p = 0.036), appetite loss (p = 0.027), and financial difficulty (p = 0.003). Performance status influenced scores for global health status (p = 0.006), physical functioning (p < 0.001), cognitive functioning (p = 0.001), and role functioning (p = 0.021). Comorbidity influenced fatigue score (p < 0.001). Cancer stage influenced scores for physical functioning (p = 0.001), role functioning (p = 0.010), and fatigue (p < 0.001). Treatment modality (chemoRT vs. RT alone) influenced scores for physical functioning (p = 0.016), fatigue (p < 0.001), nausea/vomiting (p = 0.009), and appetite loss (p < 0.001); and RT field influenced scores for nausea/vomiting (p = 0.001), appetite loss (p = 0.003), and diarrhea (p = 0.037). Radiotherapy dose functioning (p < 0.001), cognitive functioning (p < 0.001), social functioning (p < 0.001), fatigue (p < 0.001), and pain (<60 vs ≥60 Gy) had an effect on scores for physical functioning (p < 0.001), role functioning (p < 0.001), emotional (p < 0.001), insomnia (p < 0.001), constipation (p < 0.001).

Conclusion: While RT negatively affects cancer patients' QOL, restoration tends to be rapid and patients report significant improvement by 1 month post-RT. Various patient- and disease-specific factors and RT modality affect QOL in this patient group. We advocate measuring cancer patients' QOL regularly as part of routine patient management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-014-2235-yDOI Listing
September 2014

Evaluation of quality of life in Turkish patients with head and neck cancer.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2013 ;14(8):4805-9

Department of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Abdurrahman Yurtaslan Oncology Research and Training Hospital, Ankara, Turkey E-mail :

Background: In this study, our aim was to investigate the effect of factors, such as radiotherapy, the dose of radiotherapy, the region of radiotherapy, the age of the patient, performance, co-morbidity, the stage of the disease and the therapy modalities on the quality of life of patients with head and neck cancer.

Materials And Methods: Eighty-two patients who were treated by either chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy, at the Cumhuriyet University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, between February 2007 and September 2010, for head and neck cancer were included. The quality of life European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Questionnaire module to be used in Quality of Life assessments in Head and Neck Cancer (EORTC QLQ-HandN35) questionnaire was conducted in all patients before starting the radiotherapy, in the middle, at the end, at 1 month and at 6 months after the treatment.

Results: According to the questionnaires at the end and at the 6th month after the radiotherapy, it was found that the age of the patient, co-morbidity, ECOG performance state, localization, type of treatment, the stage of the disease, the dose and the region of radiotherapy affect some of the symptom scales for quality of life.

Conclusions: Quality of life was affected negatively during and after the radiotherapy. However, in the 6th month after the therapy, a significant improvement was observed in most symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2013.14.8.4805DOI Listing
May 2014

Lack of impact of age on acute side effects and tolerance of curative radiation therapy.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2013 ;14(2):969-75

Cumhuriyet University School of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey.

Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the impact of age on the occurrence, severity, and timing of acute side effects related to radiotherapy.

Materials And Methods: We analysed the data of 423 patients.

Results: Of the patients, 295 (70%) were under the age of 65 (group 1) and 128 (30%) were over the age of 65 (group 2). The frequencies of radiotherapy-induced side effects were 89% in group 1 and 87% in group 2 (p=0.286). The mean times to occurrence were 2.5±0.1 weeks in group 1 and 2.2±0.1 weeks in group 2 (p=0.013). Treatment was ended in 2% of patients in group 1 and 6% of those in group 2 (p=0.062). Treatment interruption was identified in 18% of patients in group 1 and 23% in group 2 (p=0.142). Changes in performance status were greater in older patients (p=0.013). There were no significant differences according to the frequency or severity of side effects, except skin and genitourinary complications, between the groups.

Conclusions: Early normal tissue reactions were not higher in older versus younger patients, though there was a tendency towards an earlier appearance.
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July 2014