Publications by authors named "Ebada Mohamed Said"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Ramadan fasting and liver diseases: A review with practice advices and recommendations.

Liver Int 2021 03 9;41(3):436-448. Epub 2021 Jan 9.

Faculty of Medicine, Tropical medicine and infectious diseases Department, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt.

Ramadan fasting is obligatory for Muslim healthy adults. However, there are many exemptions from fasting; including patients, whose diseases will be aggravated by fasting. Muslim patients with different liver diseases are frequently seen in the clinics discussing their intent to fast this month with their treating physicians. To answer our patients' inquiries about the expected benefits and/or risks of fasting and delivering them the best care, we carried out this review and we draw advices and recommendations based on the available evidence. A web-based search, combining multiple keywords representing different liver diseases with Ramadan fasting had been carried out. To answer the research question: Do adult Muslim patients with different liver diseases who fast the month of Ramadan have had a deleterious effect on their health in comparison to those who did not fast? Relevant publications were retrieved. No randomized controlled trials were focusing on Ramadan fasting and liver diseases in the filtered databases, eg Cochrane library. Consequently, non-filtered databases, eg PubMed, Google Scholar and Egyptian Knowledge Bank searched and full-text high-quality research articles were carefully analysed to draw recommendations. Other relevant publications with low quality of evidence like case studies and short communications were also reviewed to address practice advices. Although Ramadan fasting was found beneficial for patients with NAFLD, it was found deleterious to patients with Child B and C cirrhosis and patients with peptic ulcer. Patients with chronic hepatitis, Child A cirrhosis and those with non-complicated liver transplant can fast with prefasting assessment and strict follow up.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/liv.14775DOI Listing
March 2021

High success rates for the use of sofosbuvir/ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir + ribavirin and sofosbuvir/simeprevir/daclatasvir + ribavirin in retreatment of chronic hepatitis C infection after unsuccessful sofosbuvir/daclatasvir therapy: a real-life experience.

Arch Virol 2020 Jul 30;165(7):1633-1639. Epub 2020 Apr 30.

Tropical Medicine Department, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt.

The aim of this work was assessment of the efficacy and tolerability of two different regimens for retreatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients who failed to respond to SOF/DCV-based therapy. This prospective study included 104 HCV patients who failed to respond to SOF/DCV-based therapy. Patients were randomly allocated to two groups. Efficacy and tolerability were assessed. The 12-week sustained virological response (SVR12) rates were 96% and 94.4% in groups B and A, respectively, with no significant difference (p = 1.000). Most adverse events reported were mild to moderate, with no deaths during the study. Multi-target direct-acting antiviral (DAA) combinations are efficient for retreatment of HCV patients after failure of SOF/DCV-based therapy in real-world management.ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02992457.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00705-020-04639-xDOI Listing
July 2020

Hepatitis C Virus: Efficacy of New DAAs Regimens.

Infect Disord Drug Targets 2020 ;20(2):143-149

Tropical Medicine Department, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt.

Background: HCV treatment showed dramatical change due to the introduction of potent, strong, direct antiviral drugs. Before the appearance of Direct-acting antivirals, multiple therapeutic interventions were used for hepatitis C, but none of these interventions were effective on patient-centered outcomes. Direct-acting antivirals cause disruption of viral replication because they target specific nonstructural viral proteins.

Aim: To review the advantages of efficient HCV therapy and its long term drawbacks.

Methods: A search of the literature published in indexed databases (PubMed, Medline In-Process, and Embase) within the last 5 years was conducted. Any duplicated citations were excluded before first-pass screening. Citations (titles and abstracts) were screened for eligibility by a single reviewer. Full texts (including congress abstracts, posters and other congress communications) of citations deemed relevant during title and abstract screening were retrieved for second-pass review.

Results: Studies on the clinical effects of DAAs for hepatitis C show better tolerance, improved survival and fewer complications when compared to previous interferon therapy.

Conclusion: HCV treatment has improved dramatically. Since that time, there are multiple approved oral therapies all with high efficacy. The most important factor which should be considered during choosing appropriate therapy is to ensure that it covers the viral genotype of the infected patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1871526519666190121114003DOI Listing
December 2020

Assessment of liver fibrosis in Egyptian chronic hepatitis B patients: A comparative study including 5 noninvasive indexes.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2018 Feb;97(6):e9781

Department of Internal Medicine, Qena School of Medicine, South Valley University, Qena Department of Hepatology, Gastroenterology and Infectious Diseases Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Benha University, Benha Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Center of Cardiac and Digestive System Diseases, Sohag Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Benha University, Benha Department of Pathology, Qena School of Medicine, South Valley University, Qena Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Benha University, Benha, Egypt.

Fibrosis assessment in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is essential for prediction of long-term prognosis and proper treatment decision. This study was conducted to assess predictability of 5 simple noninvasive fibrosis indexes in comparison to liver biopsy in CHB patients.A total of 200 CHB adult Egyptian patients were consecutively included in this study, all were subjected to liver biopsy with staging of fibrosis using METAVIR scoring system. Fibrosis indexes including S-index, red cell distribution width to platelets ratio index (RPR), fibrosis-4 index (Fib-4), AST to platelets ratio index (APRI), and AST/ALT ratio index (AAR) were compared to biopsy result and their predictabilities for the different fibrosis stages were assessed using area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) analysis.S-index showed the highest AUROCs for predicting fibrosis among the studied indexes. AUROCs of S-index, RPR, Fib-4, APRI, and AAR were: 0.81, 0.67, 0.70, 0.68, and 0.60 for prediction of significant fibrosis (F2-F4), 0.90, 0.66, 0.68, 0.67, and 0.57 for advanced fibrosis (F3-F4), and 0.96, 0.62, 0.61, 0.57, and 0.53 for cirrhosis (F4), respectively. The optimal S-index cutoff for ruling in significant fibrosis was ≥0.3 with 94% specificity, 87% PPV, and 68% accuracy, while that for ruling out significant fibrosis was <0.1 with 96% sensitivity, 91% NPV, and 67% accuracy. Accuracy of S-index was higher for predicting cirrhosis (91%) than that for predicting advanced fibrosis (79%) and significant fibrosis (68%).S-index has the highest predictability for all fibrosis stages among the studied fibrosis indexes in HBeAg-negative CHB patients, with higher accuracy in cirrhosis than in the earlier fibrosis stages.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000009781DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5944664PMC
February 2018
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