Publications by authors named "E Whitney G Moore"

3,451 Publications

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Emendation of General Consideration 5 and Rules 18a, 24a and 30 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes to resolve the status of the in the prokaryotic nomenclature.

Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2021 Aug;71(8)

Department of Infectious Disease, and Culture Collection University of Gothenburg (CCUG), Institute for Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Following the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes electronic discussion and vote on proposals to resolve the status of the in the prokaryotic nomenclature, we announce here the results of the ballot. We also present the emended versions of General Consideration 5 and Rules 18a, 24a and 30, based on the outcome of the ballot, to be included in the new revision of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/ijsem.0.004939DOI Listing
August 2021

A Public Health Approach to Prevent Firearm Related Injuries and Deaths.

Ann Surg 2021 Jul 29. Epub 2021 Jul 29.

Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Department of Surgery, Ernest E Moore Shock Trauma Center at Denver Health, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, Colorado Department of Surgery, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, Australia Department of Surgery, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand Department of Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington Department of Surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0000000000005056DOI Listing
July 2021

First in-human report of the clinical accuracy of thoracolumbar percutaneous pedicle screw placement using augmented reality guidance.

Neurosurg Focus 2021 Aug;51(2):E10

Departments of1Neurosurgery and.

Objective: Augmented reality (AR) is an emerging technology that has great potential for guiding the safe and accurate placement of spinal hardware, including percutaneous pedicle screws. The goal of this study was to assess the accuracy of 63 percutaneous pedicle screws placed at a single institution using an AR head-mounted display (ARHMD) system.

Methods: Retrospective analyses were performed for 9 patients who underwent thoracic and/or lumbar percutaneous pedicle screw placement guided by ARHMD technology. Clinical accuracy was assessed via the Gertzbein-Robbins scale by the authors and by an independent musculoskeletal radiologist. Thoracic pedicle subanalysis was also performed to assess screw accuracy based on pedicle morphology.

Results: Nine patients received thoracic or lumbar AR-guided percutaneous pedicle screws. The mean age at the time of surgery was 71.9 ± 11.5 years and the mean number of screws per patient was 7. Indications for surgery were spinal tumors (n = 4, 44.4%), degenerative disease (n = 3, 33.3%), spinal deformity (n = 1, 11.1%), and a combination of deformity and infection (n = 1, 11.1%). Presenting symptoms were most commonly low-back pain (n = 7, 77.8%) and lower-extremity weakness (n = 5, 55.6%), followed by radicular lower-extremity pain, loss of lower-extremity sensation, or incontinence/urinary retention (n = 3 each, 33.3%). In all, 63 screws were placed (32 thoracic, 31 lumbar). The accuracy for these screws was 100% overall; all screws were Gertzbein-Robbins grade A or B (96.8% grade A, 3.2% grade B). This accuracy was achieved in the thoracic spine regardless of pedicle cancellous bone morphology.

Conclusions: AR-guided surgery demonstrated a 100% accuracy rate for the insertion of 63 percutaneous pedicle screws in 9 patients (100% rate of Gertzbein-Robbins grade A or B screw placement). Using an ARHMS system for the placement of percutaneous pedicle screws showed promise, but further validation using a larger cohort of patients across multiple surgeons and institutions will help to determine the true accuracy enabled by this technology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2021.5.FOCUS21217DOI Listing
August 2021

Same room - different windows? A systematic review and meta-analysis of the relationship between self-report and neuropsychological tests of cognitive flexibility in healthy adults.

Clin Psychol Rev 2021 Jun 26;88:102061. Epub 2021 Jun 26.

Innovation, Implementation & Clinical Translation (IIMPACT) in Health, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia. Electronic address:

Cognitive flexibility can be thought of as the ability to effectively adapt one's cognitive and behavioural strategies in response to changing task or environmental demands. To substantiate the common inference that self-report and neuropsychological tests of cognitive flexibility provide 'different windows into the same room', we undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine whether self-report and neuropsychological tests of cognitive flexibility are related in healthy adults. Ten databases and relevant grey literature were searched from inception. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were adhered to. Twenty-one articles satisfied our inclusion criteria. A multi-level random-effects meta-analysis revealed no relationship (0.05, 95% CI = -0.00 to 0.10). Random-effects meta-analyses raised the possibility that the Cognitive Flexibility Scale and the Trail Making Test - part B (time) may be related (0.19, 95% CI = 0.06 to 0.31). We conclude that the relationship between self-report and neuropsychological tests of cognitive flexibility is not large enough to be considered convincing evidence for the two assessment approaches sharing construct validity. These results have clear implications for assessing and interpreting cognitive flexibility research and clinical practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2021.102061DOI Listing
June 2021

Improving systems of antenatal and postpartum care for hyperglycemia in pregnancy: A process evaluation.

Int J Gynaecol Obstet 2021 Jul 31. Epub 2021 Jul 31.

Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia.

Objective: To identify successes to date and opportunities for improvement in the implementation of a complex health systems intervention aiming to improve antenatal and postpartum care and health outcomes for women with hyperglycemia in pregnancy in regional and remote Australia.

Methods: A qualitative evaluation, underpinned by the RE-AIM framework (reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, maintenance), was conducted mid-intervention. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 45 participants, including clinicians; regional policymakers and managers; and study implementation staff.

Results: Interviewees reported the early phase of the intervention had resulted in establishment of a clinician network, increased clinician awareness of hyperglycemia in pregnancy, and improvements in management including earlier referral for specialist care and a focus on improving communication with women. Enablers of implementation included existing relationships with stakeholders and alignment of the intervention with health service priorities. Challenges included engaging remote clinicians and the labor-intensive nature of maintaining a clinical register of women with hyperglycemia in pregnancy.

Conclusion: The early phase of this health systems intervention has had a positive perceived impact on systems of care for women with hyperglycemia in pregnancy. Findings have informed modifications to the intervention, including development of a communication and engagement strategy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijgo.13850DOI Listing
July 2021
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