Publications by authors named "E Strengman"

57 Publications

Amplicon-Based Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue.

Methods Mol Biol 2019 ;1908:1-17

Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is rapidly becoming the method of choice for mutation analysis in both research and diagnostics. The benefit of targeted NGS compared to whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing is that smaller amounts of input material can be used as well as qualitatively suboptimal tissue samples, like formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissue.Here, we describe the protocol for targeted next-generation sequencing using the Ion Torrent PGM platform in combination with Ion Ampliseq NGS gene panels for formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Both the manual and the automated workflow are described as well as the bioinformatics for data analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-9004-7_1DOI Listing
June 2019

E-cadherin loss induces targetable autocrine activation of growth factor signalling in lobular breast cancer.

Sci Rep 2018 10 18;8(1):15454. Epub 2018 Oct 18.

Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Despite the fact that loss of E-cadherin is causal to the development and progression of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), options to treat this major breast cancer subtype are limited if tumours develop resistance to anti-oestrogen treatment regimens. This study aimed to identify clinically targetable pathways that are aberrantly active downstream of E-cadherin loss in ILC. Using a combination of reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) analyses, mRNA sequencing, conditioned medium growth assays and CRISPR/Cas9-based knock-out experiments, we demonstrate that E-cadherin loss causes increased responsiveness to autocrine growth factor receptor (GFR)-dependent activation of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signalling. Autocrine activation of GFR signalling and its downstream PI3K/Akt hub was independent of oncogenic mutations in PIK3CA, AKT1 or PTEN. Analyses of human ILC samples confirmed growth factor production and pathway activity. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt using AZD5363 or MK2206 resulted in robust inhibition of cell growth and survival of ILC cells, and impeded tumour growth in a mouse ILC model. Because E-cadherin loss evokes hypersensitisation of PI3K/Akt activation independent of oncogenic mutations in this pathway, we propose clinical intervention of PI3K/Akt in ILC based on functional E-cadherin inactivation, irrespective of activating pathway mutations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-33525-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6193986PMC
October 2018

Genetic vulnerability to DUSP22 promoter hypermethylation is involved in the relation between in utero famine exposure and schizophrenia.

NPJ Schizophr 2018 Aug 21;4(1):16. Epub 2018 Aug 21.

Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Epigenetic changes may account for the doubled risk to develop schizophrenia in individuals exposed to famine in utero. We therefore investigated DNA methylation in a unique sample of patients and healthy individuals conceived during the great famine in China. Subsequently, we examined two case-control samples without famine exposure in whole blood and brain tissue. To shed light on the causality of the relation between famine exposure and DNA methylation, we exposed human fibroblasts to nutritional deprivation. In the famine-exposed schizophrenia patients, we found significant hypermethylation of the dual specificity phosphatase 22 (DUSP22) gene promoter (Chr6:291687-293285) (N = 153, p = 0.01). In this sample, DUSP22 methylation was also significantly higher in patients independent of famine exposure (p = 0.025), suggesting that hypermethylation of DUSP22 is also more generally involved in schizophrenia risk. Similarly, DUSP22 methylation was also higher in two separate case-control samples not exposed to famine using DNA from whole blood (N = 64, p = 0.03) and postmortem brains (N = 214, p = 0.007). DUSP22 methylation showed strong genetic regulation across chromosomes by a region on chromosome 16 which was consistent with new 3D genome interaction data. The presence of a direct link between famine and DUSP22 transcription was supported by data from cultured human fibroblasts that showed increased methylation (p = 0.048) and expression (p = 0.019) in response to nutritional deprivation (N = 10). These results highlight an epigenetic locus that is genetically regulated across chromosomes and that is involved in the response to early-life exposure to famine and that is relevant for a major psychiatric disorder.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41537-018-0058-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6104043PMC
August 2018

Maintenance treatment with capecitabine and bevacizumab versus observation in metastatic colorectal cancer: updated results and molecular subgroup analyses of the phase 3 CAIRO3 study.

Ann Oncol 2017 Sep;28(9):2128-2134

Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht.

Background: The phase 3 CAIRO3 study showed that capecitabine plus bevacizumab (CAP-B) maintenance treatment after six cycles capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab (CAPOX-B) in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients is effective, without compromising quality of life. In this post hoc analysis with updated follow-up and data regarding sidedness, we defined subgroups according to RAS/BRAF mutation status and mismatch repair (MMR) status, and investigated their influence on treatment efficacy.

Patients And Methods: A total of 558 patients with previously untreated mCRC and stable disease or better after six cycles CAPOX-B induction treatment were randomised to either CAP-B maintenance treatment (n = 279) or observation (n = 279). Upon first progression, patients were to receive CAPOX-B reintroduction until second progression (PFS2, primary end point). We centrally assessed RAS/BRAF mutation status and MMR status, or used local results if central assessment was not possible. Intention-to-treat stratified Cox models adjusted for baseline covariables were used to examine whether treatment efficacy was modified by RAS/BRAF mutation status.

Results: RAS, BRAF mutations, and MMR deficiency were detected in 240/420 (58%), 36/381 (9%), and 4/279 (1%) patients, respectively. At a median follow-up of 87 months (IQR 69-97), all mutational subgroups showed significant improvement from maintenance treatment for the primary end point PFS2 [RAS/BRAF wild-type: hazard ratio (HR) 0.57 (95% CI 0.39-0.84); RAS-mutant: HR 0.74 (0.55-0.98); V600EBRAF-mutant: HR 0.28 (0.12-0.64)] and secondary end points, except for the RAS-mutant subgroup regarding overall survival. Adjustment for sidedness instead of primary tumour location yielded comparable results. Although right-sided tumours were associated with inferior prognosis, both patients with right- and left-sided tumours showed significant benefit from maintenance treatment.

Conclusions: CAP-B maintenance treatment after six cycles CAPOX-B is effective in first-line treatment of mCRC across all mutational subgroups. The benefit of maintenance treatment was most pronounced in patients with RAS/BRAF wild-type and V600EBRAF-mutant tumours.

Clinicaltrials.gov Number: NCT00442637.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdx322DOI Listing
September 2017

Targeted next-generation sequencing of commonly mutated genes in esophageal adenocarcinoma patients with long-term survival.

Dis Esophagus 2017 Sep;30(9):1-8

Departments of Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Survival of patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma remains poor and individual differences in prognosis remain unexplained. This study investigated whether gene mutations can explain why patients with high-risk (pT3-4, pN+) esophageal adenocarcinoma survive past 5 years after esophagectomy. Six long-term survivors (LTS) (≥5 years survival without recurrence) and six short-term survivors (STS) (<2 years survival due to recurrence) who underwent resection without neoadjuvant therapy for high-risk esophageal adenocarcinoma were included. Targeted next-generation sequencing of 16 genes related to esophageal adenocarcinoma was performed. Mutations were compared between the LTS and STS and described in comparison with literature. A total of 48 mutations in 10 genes were identified. In the LTS, the median number of mutated genes per sample was 5 (range: 0-5) and the samples together harbored 22 mutations in 8 genes: APC (n = 1), CDH11 (n = 2), CDKN2A (n = 2), FAT4 (n = 5), KRAS (n = 1), PTPRD (n = 1), TLR4 (n = 8), and TP53 (n = 2). The median number of mutated genes per sample in the STS was 4 (range: 1-8) and in total 26 mutations were found in six genes: CDH11 (n = 5), FAT4 (n = 7), SMAD4 (n = 1), SMARCA4 (n = 1), TLR4 (n = 7), and TP53 (n = 5). CDH11, CDKN2A, FAT4, TLR4, and TP53 were mutated in at least 2 LTS or STS, exceeding mutation rates in literature. Mutations across the LTS and STS were found in 10 of the 16 genes. The results warrant future studies to investigate a larger range of genes in a larger sample size. This may result in a panel with prognostic genes, to predict individual prognosis and to select effective individualized therapy for patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/dote/dox058DOI Listing
September 2017
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