Publications by authors named "E H Miller"

5,766 Publications

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Maternal and Paternal Depression Symptoms During NICU Stay and Transition Home.

Pediatrics 2021 Aug 18;148(2). Epub 2021 Jun 18.

Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

Objective: To examine the trajectory and risk factors of depression symptoms among parents from NICU admission to 30 days postdischarge. We hypothesized depression symptom scores would decrease from admission and then increase from discharge to 30 days.

Methods: Prospective longitudinal cohort study of premature infants in NICU. Parents completed the validated Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at 4 time points: NICU admission, discharge, and 14 days and 30 days postdischarge. EPDS score change across time and probability of a positive screen (EPDS ≥10) were by assessed using mixed effect regression models.

Results: Of 431 parents enrolled (mothers, = 230 [53%]), 33% of mothers ( = 57) and 17% of fathers ( = 21) had a positive EPDS screening. Score change was 1.9 points different between mothers and fathers (confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-2.6; < .0001), with mothers decreasing 2.9 points (CI: 2.1-3.7; < .0001) and fathers decreasing 1.0 points (CI: 0.1-2.0; = .04). Over time, mothers decreased 10.96 times (CI: 2.99-38.20; = .0003); fathers decreased at a nonsignificant rate. Admission or discharge screening improved 30-day depressive symptom prediction (AUC 0.66 baseline demographics only versus 0.84+initial [ < .0001], and versus 0.80+discharge screening [ < .001]).

Conclusions: Mothers and fathers experience different depressive symptom trajectories from NICU to home. Screening parents for postpartum depression during the NICU stay is likely to result in improved identification of parents at risk for postpartum depression after discharge. Focused attention on fathers appears warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2020-042747DOI Listing
August 2021

Pathology in Practice.

J Am Vet Med Assoc 2021 Aug;259(4):375-378

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2460/javma.259.4.375DOI Listing
August 2021

Oral Vaccination Reduces the Effects of Challenge on the Swine Small and Large Intestine Microbiome.

Front Vet Sci 2021 16;8:692521. Epub 2021 Jul 16.

Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN, United States.

Porcine proliferative enteropathy remains one of the most prevalent diseases in swine herds worldwide. This disease is caused by , an intracellular bacterial pathogen that primarily colonizes the ileum. In this study, we evaluated changes to the microbiome of the ileal mucosa, ileal digesta, cecal digesta, and feces subsequent to challenge with and to an oral live vaccine against . Given that gut homogenates have been used since 1931 to study this disease, we also characterized the microbial composition of a gut homogenate from swine infected with that was used as challenge material. The challenge led to a dysbiosis of the microbiome of both the small and large intestine marked by an increase of pathobionts including , and . This microbiome response could play a role in favoring colonization and disease as well as potentially predisposing to other diseases. Vaccination altered both small and large intestine microbiome community structure and led to a significant 3.03 log reduction in the amount of shed by the challenged pigs. Vaccination also led to a significant decrease in the abundance of , and among other microbial changes compared with non-vaccinated and challenged animals. These results indicate that infection is associated with broad changes to microbiome composition in both the large and small intestine, many of which can be mitigated by vaccination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2021.692521DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8322526PMC
July 2021

Evaluation of electrical current production in microbial electrolysis cells fed with animal rendering wastewater.

Chemosphere 2021 Jul 12;285:131547. Epub 2021 Jul 12.

Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, 342 Computer Ct, Anderson, SC, 29625, USA. Electronic address:

Anode-respiring bacteria (ARB) generate electrical current from the oxidation of short chain fatty acids (SCFA), primarily acetate, in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). Animal rendering wastewater (RW) has high fat content, which under anaerobic conditions can yield acetate, making RW a potential feed for MECs. Yet, excess intermediate long chain fatty acids (LCFA) may limit conversion of LCFA and SCFA, and impact ARB activity. Here, we evaluated electrical current production in single-chamber MECs fed with RW. In RW-fed MECs, 34.26 ± 2.69% of the COD provided was converted to electrical current in an 80-day batch cycle. LCFA accumulated in RW-fed MECs, during which conversion of acetate to electrical current was limited. Diverse sulfate-reducing microorganisms were present in the anode biofilm in RW-fed MECs, whereas the genus Geobacter dominated in inoculum-only control MECs. Detection of H-utilizing homoacetogens suggested some internal cycling of H produced at the cathode. Overall, this study shows that current production is possible from RW, but to be a viable process for RW treatment, further improvement in rates of COD conversion and current production is necessary along with identifying configurations and/or conditions in which the inhibitory effect of LCFA is reduced.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2021.131547DOI Listing
July 2021

Vinyl-Fluorene Molecular Wires for Voltage Imaging with Enhanced Sensitivity and Reduced Phototoxicity.

J Am Chem Soc 2021 Jul 29. Epub 2021 Jul 29.

Fluorescent voltage indicators are an attractive alternative for studying the electrical activity of excitable cells; however, the development of indicators that are both highly sensitive and low in toxicity over long-term experiments remains a challenge. Previously, we reported a fluorene-based voltage-sensitive fluorophore that exhibits much lower phototoxicity than previous voltage indicators in cardiomyocyte monolayers, but suffers from low sensitivity to membrane potential changes. Here, we report that the addition of a single vinyl spacer in the fluorene molecular wire scaffold improves the voltage sensitivity 1.5- to 3.5-fold over fluorene-based voltage probes. Furthermore, we demonstrate the improved ability of the new vinyl-fluorene VoltageFluors to monitor action potential kinetics in both mammalian neurons and human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. Addition of the vinyl spacer between the aniline donor and fluorene monomer results in indicators that are significantly less phototoxic in cardiomyocyte monolayers. These results demonstrate how structural modification to the voltage sensing domain have a large effect on improving the overall properties of molecular wire-based voltage indicators.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jacs.1c04543DOI Listing
July 2021
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