Publications by authors named "E Dicker"

40 Publications

Complex inheritance and parent-of-origin effect in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

Brain Dev 2006 Mar 18;28(2):92-8. Epub 2006 Jan 18.

Clinical and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, NY 10032, USA.

Background: Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is an idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) with complex inheritance. Previous studies have suggested maternal inheritance and female excess in IGEs but have not been specific for JME. We investigated evidence for maternal inheritance, female excess and patterns of familial seizure risk in a well-characterized sample of JME families.

Methods: We ascertained 89 families through a JME proband and 50 families through a non-JME IGE proband. JME families were divided into those with and without evidence of linkage to the EJM1 susceptibility locus on chromosome 6. We analyzed transmission in 43 multigenerational families, calculated the adjusted sex ratio for JME, and looked for evidence of seizure specific risk in 806 family members.

Results: We found evidence for preferential maternal transmission in both EJM1-linked and unlinked families (2.7:1), evidence even more marked when potential selection factors were excluded. The adjusted female: male risk ratio was very high in JME (RR=12.5; 95% CI: 1.9-83.7). Absence seizures in JME probands increased the overall risk of seizures in first degree relatives (15.8% vs. 7.0%, P=0.011), as well as first-degree relatives' specific risk of absence seizures (6% vs. 1.6%, P=0.01), but not myoclonic seizures.

Conclusions: We have confirmed the finding of maternal inheritance in JME, which is not restricted to JME families linked to the EJM1 locus. The striking female excess in JME may relate to anatomical and/or endocrine sexual dimorphism in the brain. Evidence for independent inheritance of absence and myoclonic seizures in JME families reinforces a model in which combinations of loci confer susceptibility to the component seizure types of IGE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.braindev.2005.05.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1630765PMC
March 2006

Malic enzyme 2 may underlie susceptibility to adolescent-onset idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

Am J Hum Genet 2005 Jan 5;76(1):139-46. Epub 2004 Nov 5.

Division of Statistical Genetics, Department of Psychiatry, and Columbia University Genome Center, Columbia University, 722 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA.

Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) is a class of genetically determined, phenotypically related epilepsy syndromes. Linkage analysis identified a chromosome 18 locus predisposing to a number of adolescent-onset IGEs. We report a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association analysis of the region around the marker locus with the high LOD score. This analysis, which used both case-control and family-based association methods, yielded strong evidence that malic enzyme 2 (ME2) is the gene predisposing to IGE. We also observed association among subgroups of IGE syndromes. An ME2-centered nine-SNP haplotype, when present homozygously, increases the risk for IGE (odds ratio 6.1; 95% confidence interval 2.9-12.7) compared with any other genotype. Both the linkage analysis and the association analysis support recessive inheritance for the locus, which is compatible with the fact that ME2 is an enzyme. ME2 is a genome-coded mitochondrial enzyme that converts malate to pyruvate and is involved in neuronal synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The results suggest that GABA synthesis disruption predisposes to common IGE and that clinical seizures are triggered when mutations at other genes, or perhaps other insults, are present.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/426735DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1196416PMC
January 2005

Genome scan of idiopathic generalized epilepsy: evidence for major susceptibility gene and modifying genes influencing the seizure type.

Ann Neurol 2001 Mar;49(3):328-35

Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY 10029, USA.

Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) is a common, complex disease with an almost exclusively genetic etiology but with variable phenotypes. Clinically, IGE can be divided into different syndromes. Varying lines of evidence point to the involvement of several interacting genes in the etiology of IGE. We performed a genome scan in 91 families ascertained through a proband with adolescent-onset IGE. The IGEs included juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE), and epilepsy with generalized tonic clonic seizures (EGTCS). Our linkage results support an oligogenic model for IGE, with strong evidence for a locus common to most IGEs on chromosome 18 (lod score 4.4/5.2 multipoint/two-point) and other loci that may influence specific seizure phenotypes for different IGEs: a previously identified locus on chromosome 6 for JME (lod score 2.5/4.2), a locus on chromosome 8 influencing non-JME forms of IGE (lod score 3.8/2.5), and, more tentatively, two newly discovered loci for absence seizures on chromosome 5 (lod scores 3.8/2.8 and 3.4/1.9). Our data also suggest that the genetic classification of different forms of IGE is likely to cut across the clinical classification of these subforms of IGE. We hypothesize that interactions of different combinations of these loci produce the related heterogeneous phenotypes seen in IGE families.
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March 2001

Reproducibility and complications in gene searches: linkage on chromosome 6, heterogeneity, association, and maternal inheritance in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

Am J Hum Genet 2000 Feb;66(2):508-16

Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Box 1229, New York, NY 10029, USA.

Evidence for genetic influences in epilepsy is strong, but reports identifying specific chromosomal origins of those influences conflict. One early study reported that human leukocyte antigen (HLA) markers were genetically linked to juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME); this was confirmed in a later study. Other reports did not find linkage to HLA markers. One found evidence of linkage to markers on chromosome 15, another to markers on chromosome 6, centromeric to HLA. We identified families through a patient with JME and genotyped markers throughout chromosome 6. Linkage analysis assuming equal male-female recombination probabilities showed evidence for linkage (LOD score 2.5), but at a high recombination fraction (theta), suggesting heterogeneity. When linkage analysis was redone to allow independent male-female thetas, the LOD score was significantly higher (4.2) at a male-female theta of.5,.01. Although the overall pattern of LOD scores with respect to male-female theta could not be explained solely by heterogeneity, the presence of heterogeneity and predominantly maternal inheritance of JME might explain it. By analyzing loci between HLA-DP and HLA-DR and stratifying the families on the basis of evidence for or against linkage, we were able to show evidence of heterogeneity within JME and to propose a marker associated with the linked form. These data also suggest that JME may be predominantly maternally inherited and that the HLA-linked form is more likely to occur in families of European origin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/302763DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1288104PMC
February 2000

Evidence for linkage of adolescent-onset idiopathic generalized epilepsies to chromosome 8-and genetic heterogeneity.

Am J Hum Genet 1999 May;64(5):1411-9

Departments of Psychiatry,Mount Sinai Medical Center, 1 Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY l0029, USA.

Several loci and candidate genes for epilepsies or epileptic syndromes map or have been suggested to map to chromosome 8. We investigated families with adolescent-onset idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), for linkage to markers spanning chromosome 8. The IGEs that we studied included juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), epilepsy with only generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurring either randomly during the day (random grand mal) or on awakening (awakening grand mal), and juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE). We looked for a gene common to all these IGEs, but we also investigated linkage to specific subforms of IGE. We found evidence for linkage to chromosome 8 in adolescent-onset IGE families in which JME was not present. The maximum multipoint LOD score was 3.24 when family members with IGE or generalized spike-and-waves (SW) were considered affected. The LOD score remained very similar (3.18) when clinically normal family members with SW were not considered to be affected. Families with either pure grand mal epilepsy or absence epilepsy contributed equally to the positive LOD score. The area where the LOD score reaches the maximum encompasses the location of the gene for the beta3-subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRNB3), thus making this gene a possible candidate for these specific forms of adolescent-onset IGE. The data excluded linkage of JME to this region. These results indicate genetic heterogeneity within IGE and provide no evidence, on chromosome 8, for a gene common to all IGEs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/302371DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1377879PMC
May 1999