Publications by authors named "E De Crop"

12 Publications

A short story of nearly everything in ().

Fungal Syst Evol 2021 Jun 1;7:133-164. Epub 2021 Feb 1.

Ghent University, Department of Biology, Research group Mycology, K. L. Ledeganckstraat 35, 9000 Ghent, Belgium.

Fungi are a large and hyper-diverse group with major taxa present in every ecosystem on earth. However, compared to other eukaryotic organisms, their diversity is largely understudied. Since the rise of molecular techniques, new lineages are being discovered at an increasing rate, but many are not accurately characterised. Access to comprehensive and reliable taxonomic information of organisms is fundamental for research in different disciplines exploring a variety of questions. A globally dominant ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal family in terrestrial ecosystems is the (, ) family. Amongst the mainly agaricoid genera, the ectomycorrhizal genus was historically least studied due to its largely tropical distribution in many underexplored areas and the apparent occurrence of several species complexes. Due to increased studies in the tropics, with a focus on this genus, knowledge on grew. We demonstrate here that is now one of the best-known ECM genera. This paper aims to provide a thorough overview of the current knowledge of , with information on diversity, distribution, ecology, phylogeny, taxonomy, morphology, and ethnomycological uses of species in this genus. This is a result of our larger study, aimed at building a comprehensive and complete dataset or taxonomic framework for , based on molecular, morphological, biogeographical, and taxonomical data as a tool and reference for other researchers. De Crop E, Delgat L, Nuytinck J, Halling RE, Verbeken A (2021). A short story of nearly everything in . 133-164. doi: 10.3114/fuse.2021.07.07.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3114/fuse.2021.07.07DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8166210PMC
June 2021

() diversity in Central America and the Caribbean: melting pot between realms.

Persoonia 2020 Jun 12;44:278-300. Epub 2020 Jun 12.

Ghent University, Department of Biology, Research group Mycology, K.L. Ledeganckstraat 35, 9000 Ghent, Belgium.

Species of the ectomycorrhizal genus , and often entire sections, are typically unique to a single continent. Given these biogeographic patterns, an interesting region to study their diversity is Central America and the Caribbean, since the region is closely connected to and often considered a part of the North American continent, but biogeographically belong to the Neotropical realm, and comprises several regions with different geologic histories. Based on a multi-gene phylogeny and morphological study, this study shows that Central America, Mexico and the Caribbean harbour at least 35 species, of which 33 were never reported outside of this region. It was found that species from the Caribbean generally show affinities to South American taxa, while species from the Central American mainland generally show affinities to Northern hemispheric taxa. We hypothesise that host specificity and/or climate play a crucial role in these different origins of diversity. Because of these different affinities, Caribbean islands harbour a completely different diversity than the Central American mainland. The majority of species occurring on the islands can be considered endemic to certain islands or island groups. In this paper, detailed morphological descriptions are given, with a focus on the unique diversity of the islands, and identification keys to all hitherto described species occurring in Central America and the Caribbean are provided. One new section, sect. , and three new species, , and are described.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3767/persoonia.2020.44.10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7567962PMC
June 2020

Looks can be deceiving: the deceptive milkcaps (, Russulaceae) exhibit low morphological variance but harbour high genetic diversity.

IMA Fungus 2019 18;10:14. Epub 2019 Sep 18.

Department of Biology, Research group Mycology, Ghent University, K.L. Ledeganckstraat 35, 9000 Ghent, Belgium.

The ectomycorrhizal genus is known to contain many species complexes, consisting of morphologically very similar species, which can be considered cryptic or pseudocryptic. In this paper, a thorough molecular study is performed of the clade around (originally described by Peck from North America) or the deceptive milkcaps. Even though most collections were identified as , the clade is shown to contain at least 15 species, distributed across Asia and America, indicating that the clade represents a species complex. These species are morphologically very similar and are characterized by a tomentose pileus with thin-walled hyphae and a velvety stipe with thick-walled hyphae. An ITS1 sequence was obtained through Illumina sequencing for the lectotype of , dating from 1885, revealing which clade represents the true . In addition, it is shown that three other described species also belong to the clade: , and and molecularly confirmed that represents a synonym of . Furthermore, two new Neotropical species are described: and .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s43008-019-0017-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7325672PMC
September 2019

Updated taxonomy of LactifluussectionLuteoli: from Australia and from Thailand.

MycoKeys 2019 10;56:13-32. Epub 2019 Jul 10.

Research Group Mycology, Department of Biology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium Ghent University Ghent Belgium.

Dierickx & De Crop and Froyen & De Crop are described from eucalypt forests in Queensland, Australia and different forest types in Thailand, respectively. Both species have recently been published on Index Fungorum and fit morphologically and molecularly in L.sect.Luteoli, a section within L.subg.Gymnocarpi that encompasses species with alboochraceous basidiomes, white latex that stains brown and typical capitate elements in the pileipellis and/or marginal cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/mycokeys.56.35204DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6637039PMC
July 2019

(Russulales, Russulaceae), a new species from the Guineo-Congolian rainforest.

MycoKeys 2019 28(45):25-39. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Research Group Mycology, Department of Biology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium Ghent University Ghent Belgium.

The milkcap genus is one of the most common ectomycorrhizal genera within Central African rainforests. During a field trip to the Dja Biosphere Reserve in Cameroon, a new species was found. Molecular and morphological analyses indicate that the species belongs to LactifluussectionXerampelini and we formally describe it here as
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/mycokeys.45.29964DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6361869PMC
January 2019