Publications by authors named "E Colon"

161 Publications

How the variability between computer-assisted analysis procedures evaluating immune markers can influence patients' outcome prediction.

Histochem Cell Biol 2021 Aug 12. Epub 2021 Aug 12.

Department of Pathology, Oncological Pathology and Bioinformatics Research Group, Hospital de Tortosa Verge de la Cinta, Carrer de les Esplanetes, 14, 43500, Tortosa, Spain.

Differences between computer-assisted image analysis (CAI) algorithms may cause discrepancies in the identification of immunohistochemically stained immune biomarkers in biopsies of breast cancer patients. These discrepancies have implications for their association with disease outcome. This study aims to compare three CAI procedures (A, B and C) to measure positive marker areas in post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy biopsies of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and to explore the differences in their performance in determining the potential association with relapse in these patients. A total of 3304 digital images of biopsy tissue obtained from 118 TNBC patients were stained for seven immune markers using immunohistochemistry (CD4, CD8, FOXP3, CD21, CD1a, CD83, HLA-DR) and were analyzed with procedures A, B and C. The three methods measure the positive pixel markers in the total tissue areas. The extent of agreement between paired CAI procedures, a principal component analysis (PCA) and Cox multivariate analysis was assessed. Comparisons of paired procedures showed close agreement for most of the immune markers at low concentration. The probability of differences between the paired procedures B/C and B/A was generally higher than those observed in C/A. The principal component analysis, largely based on data from CD8, CD1a and HLA-DR, identified two groups of patients with a significantly lower probability of relapse than the others. The multivariate regression models showed similarities in the factors associated with relapse for procedures A and C, as opposed to those obtained with procedure B. General agreement among the results of CAI procedures would not guarantee that the same predictive breast cancer markers were consistently identified. These results highlight the importance of developing additional strategies to improve the sensitivity of CAI procedures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00418-021-02022-8DOI Listing
August 2021

Implementation of a pooled surveillance testing program for asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infections in K-12 schools and universities.

EClinicalMedicine 2021 Aug 17;38:101028. Epub 2021 Jul 17.

Mirimus Inc, 760 Parkside Ave. Suite 206, Brooklyn, NY 11226, USA.

Background: The negative impact of continued school closures during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic warrants the establishment of cost-effective strategies for surveillance and screening to safely reopen and monitor for potential in-school transmission. Here, we present a novel approach to increase the availability of repetitive and routine COVID-19 testing that may ultimately reduce the overall viral burden in the community.

Methods: We implemented a testing program using the SalivaClear࣪ pooled surveillance method that included students, faculty and staff from K-12 schools (student age range 5-18 years) and universities (student age range >18 years) across the country (Mirimus Clinical Labs, Brooklyn, NY). The data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, kappa agreement, and outlier detection analysis.

Findings: From August 27, 2020 until January 13, 2021, 253,406 saliva specimens were self-collected from students, faculty and staff from 93 K-12 schools and 18 universities. Pool sizes of up to 24 samples were tested over a 20-week period. Pooled testing did not significantly alter the sensitivity of the molecular assay in terms of both qualitative (100% detection rate on both pooled and individual samples) and quantitative (comparable cycle threshold (Ct) values between pooled and individual samples) measures. The detection of SARS-CoV-2 in saliva was comparable to the nasopharyngeal swab. Pooling samples substantially reduced the costs associated with PCR testing and allowed schools to rapidly assess transmission and adjust prevention protocols as necessary. In one instance, in-school transmission of the virus was determined within the main office and led to review and revision of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems.

Interpretation: By establishing low-cost, weekly testing of students and faculty, pooled saliva analysis for the presence of SARS-CoV-2 enabled schools to determine whether transmission had occurred, make data-driven decisions, and adjust safety protocols. We provide strong evidence that pooled testing may be a fundamental component to the reopening of schools by minimizing the risk of in-school transmission among students and faculty.

Funding: Skoll Foundation generously provided funding to Mobilizing Foundation and Mirimus for these studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eclinm.2021.101028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8286123PMC
August 2021

Metastasis of Uterine Leiomyosarcoma to the Breast: Medical and Histopathological Criteria.

Authors:
Eugenia Colón

Case Rep Pathol 2020 18;2020:8037646. Epub 2020 Dec 18.

Department of Pathology, Unilabs, St. Görans Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

It is uncommon for extramammary tumors to metastasize to the breast, and very few cases describing metastasis of primary uterine leiomyosarcoma to the breast have been reported. We present the case of a 51-year-old woman diagnosed with metastasis of uterine leiomyosarcoma to the breast diagnosed 10 years ago after hysterectomy. Ultrasonography, mammography, and cytology were used to establish a preliminary diagnosis that was confirmed upon examination of the excised tumor that show a rare soft tissue tumor composed of atypical spindle cells and increased proliferation rate. We discuss the importance of distinguishing between various primary mesenchymal tumors of the breast because of phenotypic overlap and some guidance of the histological criteria for metastasis of leiomyosarcoma, as well as differential diagnosis and surgical treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/8037646DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7762671PMC
December 2020

Migraine in the Young Brain: Adolescents vs. Young Adults.

Front Hum Neurosci 2019 22;13:87. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Center for Pain and the Brain, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.

Migraine is a disease that peaks in late adolescence and early adulthood. The aim of this study was to evaluate age-related brain changes in resting state functional connectivity (rs-FC) in migraineurs vs. age-sex matched healthy controls at two developmental stages: adolescence vs. young adulthood. The effect of the disease was assessed within each developmental group and age- and sex-matched healthy controls and between developmental groups (migraine-related age effects). Globally the within group comparisons indicated more widespread abnormal rs-FC in the adolescents than in the young adults and more abnormal rs-FC associated with sensory networks in the young adults. Direct comparison of the two groups showed a number of significant changes: (1) more connectivity changes in the default mode network in the adolescents than in the young adults; (2) stronger rs-FC in the cerebellum network in the adolescents in comparison to young adults; and (3) stronger rs-FC in the executive and sensorimotor network in the young adults. The duration and frequency of the disease were differently associated with baseline intrinsic connectivity in the two groups. fMRI resting state networks demonstrate significant changes in brain function at critical time point of brain development and that potentially different treatment responsivity for the disease may result.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2019.00087DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6438928PMC
March 2019

A Profilometry-Based Dentifrice Abrasion Method for V8 Brushing Machines Part III: Multi-Laboratory Validation Testing of RDA-PE.

J Clin Dent 2017 Sep;28(3):56-61

Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Objectives: We have previously reported on progress toward the refinement of profilometry-based abrasivity testing of dentifrices using a V8 brushing machine and tactile or optical measurement of dentin wear. The general application of this technique may be advanced by demonstration of successful inter-laboratory confirmation of the method. The objective of this study was to explore the capability of different laboratories in the assessment of dentifrice abrasivity using a profilometry-based evaluation technique developed in our Mason laboratories. In addition, we wanted to assess the interchangeability of human and bovine specimens.

Methods: Participating laboratories were instructed in methods associated with Radioactive Dentin Abrasivity-Profilometry Equivalent (RDA-PE) evaluation, including site visits to discuss critical elements of specimen preparation, masking, profilometry scanning, and procedures. Laboratories were likewise instructed on the requirement for demonstration of proportional linearity as a key condition for validation of the technique. Laboratories were provided with four test dentifrices, blinded for testing, with a broad range of abrasivity. In each laboratory, a calibration curve was developed for varying V8 brushing strokes (0, 4,000, and 10,000 strokes) with the ISO abrasive standard. Proportional linearity was determined as the ratio of standard abrasion mean depths created with 4,000 and 10,000 strokes (2.5 fold differences). Criteria for successful calibration within the method (established in our Mason laboratory) was set at proportional linearity = 2.5 ± 0.3. RDA-PE was compared to Radiotracer RDA for the four test dentifrices, with the latter obtained by averages from three independent Radiotracer RDA sites. Individual laboratories and their results were compared by 1) proportional linearity and 2) acquired RDA-PE values for test pastes.

Results: Five sites participated in the study. One site did not pass proportional linearity objectives. Data for this site are not reported at the request of the researchers. Three of the remaining four sites reported herein tested human dentin and all three met proportional linearity objectives for human dentin. Three of four sites participated in testing bovine dentin and all three met the proportional linearity objectives for bovine dentin. RDA-PE values for test dentifrices were similar between sites. All four sites that met proportional linearity requirement successfully identified the dentifrice formulated above the industry standard 250 RDA (as RDA-PE). The profilometry method showed at least as good reproducibility and differentiation as Radiotracer assessments. It was demonstrated that human and bovine specimens could be used interchangeably.

Conclusions: The standardized RDA-PE method was reproduced in multiple laboratories in this inter-laboratory study. Evidence supports that this method is a suitable technique for ISO method 11609 Annex B.
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September 2017
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