Publications by authors named "E C Klatt"

86 Publications

SOS in a pandemic: Staffing strategies for COVID-19.

Nurs Manage 2021 04;52(4):22-30

In Colo., Amanda Moorer is a nurse residency program manager at UCHealth in Aurora, Elizabeth Klatt is an oncology/gynecologic-oncology/medicine unit nurse manager at the University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora, Olivia Thornton is a medical ICU and wound care associate nurse manager at the University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora, Thu-Nhi Groves is a resource office nurse manager at the University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora, Bree Eisenach is a resource management center nurse manager at the Medical Center of the Rockies in Loveland, Kate Soholt is a float pool/PRN pool/women and family support team nurse manager at Poudre Valley Hospital in Fort Collins, Wendy J. Haylett is a research nurse scientist at UCHealth in Aurora, Karen L. Hessler is a research nurse scientist at UCHealth in Windsor, and Jennifer Zwink is the vice president of nursing and ACNO at the University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.NUMA.0000733628.46685.bcDOI Listing
April 2021

The Human Interface of Biomedical Informatics.

Authors:
Edward C Klatt

J Pathol Inform 2018 6;9:30. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Mercer University School of Medicine, Savannah, Georgia, USA.

Biomedical informatics is the science of information, where information is defined as data with meaning. This definition identifies a fundamental challenge for informaticians: connecting with the healthcare team by enabling the acquisition, retrieval, and processing of information within the cognitive capabilities of the human brain. Informaticians can become aware of the constraints involved with cognitive processing and with workplace factors that impact how information is acquired and used to facilitate an improved user interface providing information to healthcare teams. Constraints affecting persons in the work environment include as follows: (1) cognitive processing of information; (2) cognitive load and memory capacity; (3) stress-affecting cognition; (4) cognitive distraction, attention, and multitasking; (5) cognitive bias and flexibility; (6) communication barriers; and (7) workplace environment. The human brain has a finite cognitive load capacity for processing new information. Short-term memory has limited throughput for processing of new informational items, while long-term memory supplies immediate simultaneous access to multiple informational items. Visual long-term memories can be extensive and detailed. Attention may be task dependent and highly variable among persons and requires maintaining control over distracting information. Multitasking reduces the effectiveness of working memory applied to each task. Transfer of information from person to person, or machine to person, is subject to cognitive bias and environmental stressors. High-stress levels increase emotional arousal to reduce memory formation and retrieval. The workplace environment can impact cognitive processes and stress, so maintaining civility augments cognitive abilities. Examples of human-computer interfaces employing principles of cognitive informatics inform design of systems to enhance the user interface.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jpi.jpi_39_18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6142878PMC
September 2018

Intra- and postoperative intravenous ketamine does not prevent chronic pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Scand J Pain 2015 Apr 1;7(1):42-54. Epub 2015 Apr 1.

Department for Anaesthesia, Surgical Intensive Care, Prehospital Emergency Medicine and Pain Therapy, University of Basel Hospital, CH-4031 Basel Switzerland.

Background and aims The development of postoperative chronic pain (POCP) after surgery is a major problem with a considerable socioeconomic impact. It is defined as pain lasting more than the usual healing, often more than 2-6 months. Recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses demonstrate that the N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor antagonist ketamine given peri- and intraoperatively can reduce immediate postoperative pain, especially if severe postoperative pain is expected and regional anaesthesia techniques are impossible. However, the results concerning the role of ketamine in preventing chronic postoperative pain are conflicting. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review and a pooled analysis to determine if peri- and intraoperative ketamine can reduce the incidence of chronic postoperative pain. Methods Electronic searches of PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane including data until September 2013 were conducted. Subsequently, the titles and abstracts were read, and reference lists of reviews and retrieved studies were reviewed for additional studies. Where necessary, authors were contacted to obtain raw data for statistical analysis. Papers reporting on ketamine used in the intra- and postoperative setting with pain measured at least 4 weeks after surgery were identified. For meta-analysis of pain after 1, 3, 6 and 12 months, the results were summarised in a forest plot, indicating the number of patients with and without pain in the ketamine and the control groups. The cut-off value used for the VAS/NRS scales was 3 (range 0-10), which is a generally well-accepted value with clinical impact in view of quality of life. Results Our analysis identified ten papers for the comprehensive meta-analysis, including a total of 784 patients. Three papers, which included a total of 303 patients, reported a positive outcome concerning persistent postsurgical pain. In the analysis, only one of nine pooled estimates of postoperative pain at rest or in motion after 1, 3, 6 or 12 months, defined as a value ≥3 on a visual analogue scale of 0-10, indicated a marginally significant pain reduction. Conclusions Based on the currently available data, there is currently not sufficient evidence to support a reduction in chronic pain due to perioperative administration of ketamine. Only the analysis of postoperative pain at rest after 1 month resulted in a marginally significant reduction of chronic postoperative pain using ketamine in the perioperative setting. Implications It can be hypothesised, that regional anaesthesia in addition to the administration of perioperative ketamine might have a preventive effect on the development of persistent postsurgical pain. An additional high-quality pain relief intra- and postoperatively as well after discharge could be more effective than any particular analgesic method per se. It is an assumption that a low dose infusion ketamine has to be administered for more than 72 h to reduce the risk of chronic postoperative pain.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2014.12.005DOI Listing
April 2015

Alexithymia, emotional dysregulation, and recovery from alcoholism: therapeutic response to assessment of mood.

Qual Health Res 2015 Jun 25;25(6):794-805. Epub 2015 Mar 25.

University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA.

This study is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial that tested the effects of a gratitude intervention on well-being in a sample of individuals in outpatient treatment for alcohol use disorder (AUD). Follow-up qualitative interviews unexpectedly revealed that participants found the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) to be helpful to their recovery in the ways that it asked them to identify and rate their emotions. Participant statements were purposively sampled and analyzed using grounded theory methods to produce a conceptual framework illustrating the process of mood identification and its sequelae. Evidence of existing alexithymia and emotional dysregulation, dominance of negative mood, and increasing ability to identify, accept, and regulate mood as part of recovery was found. Findings suggest that emotion regulation is a compelling topic for those in recovery from AUD, and may deserve a more prominent role in treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1049732315577608DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4425592PMC
June 2015

Web-based pathology practice examination usage.

Authors:
Edward C Klatt

J Pathol Inform 2014 30;5(1):34. Epub 2014 Sep 30.

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Mercer University School of Medicine, Savannah, GA, USA.

Context: General and subject specific practice examinations for students in health sciences studying pathology were placed onto a free public internet web site entitled web path and were accessed four clicks from the home web site menu.

Subjects And Methods: Multiple choice questions were coded into. html files with JavaScript functions for web browser viewing in a timed format. A Perl programming language script with common gateway interface for web page forms scored examinations and placed results into a log file on an internet computer server. The four general review examinations of 30 questions each could be completed in up to 30 min. The 17 subject specific examinations of 10 questions each with accompanying images could be completed in up to 15 min each. The results of scores and user educational field of study from log files were compiled from June 2006 to January 2014.

Results: The four general review examinations had 31,639 accesses with completion of all questions, for a completion rate of 54% and average score of 75%. A score of 100% was achieved by 7% of users, ≥90% by 21%, and ≥50% score by 95% of users. In top to bottom web page menu order, review examination usage was 44%, 24%, 17%, and 15% of all accessions. The 17 subject specific examinations had 103,028 completions, with completion rate 73% and average score 74%. Scoring at 100% was 20% overall, ≥90% by 37%, and ≥50% score by 90% of users. The first three menu items on the web page accounted for 12.6%, 10.0%, and 8.2% of all completions, and the bottom three accounted for no more than 2.2% each.

Conclusions: Completion rates were higher for shorter 10 questions subject examinations. Users identifying themselves as MD/DO scored higher than other users, averaging 75%. Usage was higher for examinations at the top of the web page menu. Scores achieved suggest that a cohort of serious users fully completing the examinations had sufficient preparation to use them to support their pathology education.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2153-3539.141987DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4204303PMC
October 2014