Publications by authors named "Dylan G Serpas"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Pain intensity and physical performance among individuals with fibromyalgia in mid-to-late life: The influence of depressive symptoms.

J Health Psychol 2021 Apr 10:13591053211009286. Epub 2021 Apr 10.

California State University Fullerton, USA.

This study investigated the mediating role of depressive symptoms among 147 middle-aged and older adults with FM in the relationship between pain intensity and 4 objective measures of physical performance: Fullerton Advanced Balance scale (FAB), 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), 30-Second Chair Stand (30SCS), and 8-Foot Up and Go Test (8FUPGT). Asymptotic mediation analyses revealed that depressive symptoms fully mediated the relationship between pain intensity and FAB (95% CI [-0.40, -0.10]) and 8FUPGT (CI [0.02, 0.11]) and partially mediated the relationship to 6MWT (CI [-9.15, -2.20]) and 30SCS (CI [-0.29, -0.06]). Findings support the evaluation of co-morbid depression in FM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/13591053211009286DOI Listing
April 2021

A path model of racial/ethnic discrimination and cardiovascular disease risk factors among college students of color.

J Am Coll Health 2020 Nov 5:1-5. Epub 2020 Nov 5.

Department of Psychology, University of La Verne, La Verne, California, USA.

Objective: Racial/ethnic minorities experience disproportionately greater risk to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). This study examined racial/ethnic discrimination-as a psychosocial stressor-in a path model and its associations with CVD health risk factors among undergraduate students of color (SoC). The sample included 404 SoC whose ages ranged from 18 to 54 ( = 21.82,  = 5.26; 65% female) from a Hispanic Serving Institution in Southern California. Participants responded to measures assessing the following traditional and non-traditional CVD indicators: depression, anxiety, and body mass index (BMI). A path model was configured with paths corresponding from racial/ethnic discrimination to BMI, depression, and anxiety symptoms, controlling for gender and age. After accounting for covariates, findings revealed greater levels of racial/ethnic discrimination was uniquely associated with greater BMI, depression, and anxiety symptoms. Findings demonstrate racial/ethnic discrimination is associated with CVD health risk factors among SoC. Data highlight the importance and magnitude of adverse psychosocial experiences on CVD health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2020.1841772DOI Listing
November 2020