Publications by authors named "Douglas McPhie"

3 Publications

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Reproductive Status of Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Females Influences Attraction to Fermentation-Based Baits and Ripe Fruits.

J Econ Entomol 2017 08;110(4):1648-1652

Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7634, Raleigh, NC 27695-7634.

Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) is an invasive species that is a devastating pest of soft-skinned fruit crops. Although much effort has been directed toward developing traps and attractants to monitor for D. suzukii, current monitoring tools do not reliably predict fruit infestation. The objective of this study was to determine if D. suzukii females at different developmental stages are differentially attracted to monitoring traps with fermentation-based baits and ripe fruits. Females were collected on the surface of traps, within traps, and on ripe fruits during three experiments at field locations in North Carolina, USA, and were dissected to determine their reproductive status. In general, females collected on ripe fruits were more likely to have mature eggs present in their ovaries and had higher numbers of mature eggs than females collected on the surface of or within monitoring traps. The results of this study have implications for D. suzukii monitoring and the development of effective baits for use in integrated pest management programs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jee/tox150DOI Listing
August 2017

Effect of Simulated Anthonomus signatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Injury on Strawberries (Fragaria × ananassa) Grown in Southeastern Plasticulture Production.

J Econ Entomol 2017 02;110(1):208-212

Department of Entomology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA.

Female strawberry bud weevils (Anthonomus signatus Say) oviposit in developing flower buds of strawberries (Fragaria spp.), caneberries (Rubus spp.), and red bud (Cercis canadensis). After laying a single egg, weevils will girdle or "clip" the buds at the pedicel, killing the bud and preventing fruit development. This injury is of concern to commercial strawberry growers, who typically assume the loss of one clipped bud is the loss of one average sized fruit, causing the economic threshold to be set extremely low. There is evidence of compensation in some cultivars of strawberries, but research has previously only been conducted in perennial strawberry production. The majority of strawberries in the southeastern United States are grown in annual plasticulture systems. We assessed the ability of five strawberry cultivars commonly grown in annual plasticulture to compensate for A. signatus injury by removing buds at different growth stages. There was no effect of bud removal on total yield in any of the cultivars tested. Harvest timing was affected by simulated A. signatus damage in some cultivars, which may be an important consideration for direct market strawberry growers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jee/tow266DOI Listing
February 2017

Multistate Comparison of Attractants for Monitoring Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in Blueberries and Caneberries.

Environ Entomol 2015 Jun 21;44(3):704-12. Epub 2015 Mar 21.

Department of Entomology, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7634, Raleigh, NC 27695-7634.

Drosophila suzukii Matsumara, also referred to as the spotted wing drosophila, has recently expanded its global range with significant consequences for its primary host crops: blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, cherries, and strawberries. D. suzukii populations can increase quickly, and their infestation is difficult to predict and prevent. The development of effective tools to detect D. suzukii presence in new areas, to time the beginning of activity within a crop, to track seasonal activity patterns, and to gauge the effectiveness of management efforts has been a key research goal. We compared the efficiency, selectivity, and relationship to fruit infestation of a range of commonly used homemade baits and a synthetic formulated lure across a wide range of environments in 10 locations throughout the United States. Several homemade baits were more efficient than apple cider vinegar, a commonly used standard, and a commercially formulated lure was, in some configurations and environments, comparable with the most effective homemade attractant as well as potentially more selective. All alternative attractants also captured flies between 1 and 2 wk earlier than apple cider vinegar, and detected the presence of D. suzukii prior to the development of fruit infestation. Over half the Drosophila spp. flies captured in traps baited with any of the attractants were not D. suzukii, which may complicate their adoption by nonexpert users. The alternative D. suzukii attractants tested are improvement on apple cider vinegar and may be useful in the development of future synthetic lures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ee/nvv022DOI Listing
June 2015