Publications by authors named "Dorthe Djernis"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Short Mindfulness Retreat for Students to Reduce Stress and Promote Self-Compassion: Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial Exploring Both an Indoor and a Natural Outdoor Retreat Setting.

Healthcare (Basel) 2021 Jul 18;9(7). Epub 2021 Jul 18.

Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, DK-8200 Aarhus, Denmark.

Here, we developed and examined a new way of disseminating mindfulness in nature to people without meditation experience, based on the finding that mindfulness conducted in natural settings may have added benefits. We evaluated a 5-day residential programme aiming to reduce stress and improve mental health outcomes. We compared an indoor and an outdoor version of the programme to a control group in a pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT). Sixty Danish university students experiencing moderate to high levels of stress were randomised into a residential mindfulness programme indoors ( = 20), in nature ( = 22), or a control group ( = 18). Participants completed the Perceived Stress Scale and the Self-Compassion Scale (primary outcomes) along with additional secondary outcome measures at the start and end of the program and 3 months after. Stress was decreased with small to medium effect sizes post-intervention, although not statistically significant. Self-compassion increased post-intervention, but effect sizes were small and not significant. At follow-up, changes in stress were not significant, however self-compassion increased for both interventions with medium-sized effects. For the intervention groups, medium- to large-sized positive effects on trait mindfulness after a behavioural task were found post-intervention, and small- to medium-sized effects in self-reported mindfulness were seen at follow-up. Connectedness to Nature was the only outcome measure with an incremental effect in nature, exceeding the control with a medium-sized effect at follow-up. All participants in the nature arm completed the intervention, and so did 97% of the participants in all three arms. Overall, the results encourage the conduct of a larger-scale RCT, but only after adjusting some elements of the programme to better fit and take advantage of the potential benefits of the natural environment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9070910DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8307600PMC
July 2021

A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Nature-Based Mindfulness: Effects of Moving Mindfulness Training into an Outdoor Natural Setting.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2019 09 2;16(17). Epub 2019 Sep 2.

Department of Psychology and Behavioural Sciences, Aarhus University, C 8000 Aarhus, Denmark.

Research has proven that both mindfulness training and exposure to nature have positive health effects. The purpose of this study was to systematically review quantitative studies of mindfulness interventions conducted in nature (nature-based mindfulness), and to analyze the effects through meta-analyses. Electronic searches revealed a total of 25 studies to be included, examining 2990 participants. Three analyses were conducted: Nature-based mindfulness interventions evaluated as open trials (k = 13), nature-based mindfulness compared with groups in non-active control conditions (k = 5), and nature-based mindfulness compared with similar interventions but without contact with nature (k = 7). The overall combined psychological, physiological, and interpersonal effects from pre- to post-intervention were statistically significant and of medium size ( = 0.54, < .001). Moderation analyses showed that natural environments characterized as forests/wild nature obtained larger numerical effects than environments characterized as gardens/parks, as did informal mindfulness compared with formal mindfulness. The small number of studies included, as well as the heterogeneity and generally low quality of the studies, must be taken into consideration when the results are interpreted. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42017065639.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173202DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6747393PMC
September 2019

[Psychological, neurological and cell-mediated mechanisms by mindfulness-based therapy].

Ugeskr Laeger 2019 Jul;181(30)

In this review, we present clinical studies on mindfulness-based therapy (MBT) with a focus on mediating mechanisms for its health promoting effects. These constitute awareness, self-compassion, regulation of dysfunctional patterns of thoughts and emotions, neural network and cellular processes. Among cellular processes are inflammation, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and telomere shortening, which all contribute to the molecular pathophysiology of several of today's lifestyle diseases. Finally, we address applications, where strong evidence exists for the clinical impact of MBT.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2019

Post-Occupancy Evaluation of a Crisis Shelter Garden and Application of Findings Through the Use of a Participatory Design Process.

HERD 2019 07 22;12(3):153-167. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

1 Section of Landscape Architecture and Planning, Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.

Objective: This study concerned optimization of an evidence-based crisis shelter garden as a setting for everyday activities and nature-based therapy. The study hereby tested the design guidelines that the garden is based on.

Background: Design guidelines for gardens intended to support health are becoming increasingly specialized, targeting different user groups. This study contributes to the knowledge concerning health-supporting garden design at crisis shelters for women and children who are exposed to domestic violence.

Method: The study included a post-occupancy evaluation (POE) consisting of landscape analyses, observation of physical traces, and interviews as well as a subsequent participatory design process.

Results: The landscape analyses and the observation of physical traces indicated a minimal level of maintenance and recurrent use being limited to a few areas of the garden. The interviews added nuance and new issues to these results, resulting in the following themes: maintenance, accessibility, safety, therapeutic setting and free space, many ways to play, and social and private spheres. The participatory design process led to an optimization of the garden, including changes to its physical design related to making the garden safer, positively distractive, and more versatile in terms of activities. Improvements were also made regarding policy for use, maintenance, and informing users.

Conclusion: The design guidelines were tested, and the evidence was strengthened, adding nuance and new issues to consider during further development of the guidelines. Both the POE and the participatory design process were confirmed as crucial aspects of evidence-based health design.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1937586718812444DOI Listing
July 2019

'Everything just seems much more right in nature': How veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder experience nature-based activities in a forest therapy garden.

Health Psychol Open 2016 Jan 31;3(1):2055102916637090. Epub 2016 Mar 31.

University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Available evidence shows that an increasing number of soldiers are seeking help for post-traumatic stress disorder. The post-traumatic stress disorder condition has big emotional and psychological consequences for the individual, his/her family and the society. Little research has been done to explore the impact of nature-based therapy for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder although there is a growing amount of evidence pointing towards positive outcome. This qualitative study aims to achieve a deeper understanding of this relationship from the veteran's perspective. Eight Danish veterans participated in a 10-week nature-based therapy. Qualitative interviews were conducted and analysed using the interpretative phenomenological method. The results indicated that the veterans have achieved tools to use in stressful situations and experienced an improvement in their post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2055102916637090DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5193293PMC
January 2016
-->