Publications by authors named "Dorothee Foernzler"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A phase II pharmacodynamic study of erlotinib in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy.

Clin Cancer Res 2008 Jun;14(12):3867-74

Medical Oncology Service and Pathology Service, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain.

Purpose: To examine potential markers of clinical benefit and the effects of erlotinib on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients refractory to platinum-based chemotherapy.

Experimental Design: Patients were given erlotinib (150 mg/d). Tumor biopsies were done immediately before treatment and in a subgroup of patients after 6 weeks' treatment.

Results: Of 73 evaluable patients, 7 (10%) had partial response and 28 (38%) had stable disease. In 53 patients with baseline tumor samples, no relationship was observed between pretreatment levels of EGFR, phosphorylated (p)-EGFR, p-AKT, p-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), or p27 and clinical benefit (i.e., response, or stable disease >/=12 weeks). Tumors from 15 of 57 patients had high EGFR gene copy number, assessed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH positive), 10 of whom had clinical benefit, compared with 5 of 42 FISH-negative patients. FISH-positive patients had longer median progression-free [137 versus 43 days, P = 0.002; hazard ratio (HR), 0.37] and overall (226 versus 106 days, P = 0.267; HR, 0.70) survival than FISH-negative patients. In paired biopsy samples from 14 patients, p-EGFR (P = 0.002), p-MAPK (P = 0.001), and Ki-67 (P = 0.025) levels were significantly reduced after 6 weeks' treatment. Apoptosis was significantly increased in patients with clinical benefit (P = 0.029), and may be a marker of clinical benefit.

Conclusion: In this study, EGFR FISH-positive status was associated with improved outcome after erlotinib therapy. Erlotinib led to reduced levels of p-EGFR, p-MAPK, and Ki-67, and stimulated apoptosis in tumor samples from patients with clinical benefit.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-07-5186DOI Listing
June 2008

Interaction between CYP1A1 T3801C and AHR G1661A polymorphisms according to smoking status on blood pressure in the Stanislas cohort.

J Hypertens 2006 Nov;24(11):2199-205

INSERM U525, Faculté de Pharmacie, Université Henri Poincaré Nancy 1, Nancy, France.

Background: CYP1A1, one of the key enzymes in detoxifying toxic components produced during cigarette smoking, is regulated by aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). A CYP1A1 T3801C polymorphism, associated with a higher CYP1A1 inducibility and enhanced catalytic activity, has been linked to stroke, triple vessel disease and may, therefore, be associated with blood pressure (BP). The relation of the widely studied G1661A polymorphism of the human AHR gene with BP is unknown.

Objectives: To investigate the genetic influence of CYP1A1 T3801C and AHR G1661A polymorphisms on BP in relation to tobacco consumption.

Design And Participants: Study participants were selected from a French longitudinal cohort of volunteers for a free health check-up. These individuals (302 men and 311 women) were not taking medication that can affect blood pressure. Information about active smoking status was obtained by a self-administered questionnaire.

Results: After multiple regression analysis, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) did not differ significantly according to their tobacco status excepted for DBP in men. In addition, neither CYP1A1 T3801C nor AHR G1661A polymorphism was linked to blood pressure. However, systolic and diastolic blood pressures differed significantly according to CYP1A1 T3801C genotype between ex-smokers and smokers. Finally, the interaction between CYP1A1 T3801C and AHR G1661A polymorphisms explained a significant difference of SBP and DBP between carriers of both CYP1A1-C3801 and AHR-A1661 alleles.

Conclusion: This study is the first to show an interaction between the CYP1A1 T3801C and AHR G1661A polymorphisms. This interaction could explain the difference in blood pressure level between smokers and non-smokers/ex-smokers but needs to be confirmed in a large sample.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.hjh.0000249697.26983.aaDOI Listing
November 2006

Molecular genetics of pseudoxanthoma elasticum: type and frequency of mutations in ABCC6.

Hum Mutat 2005 Sep;26(3):235-48

Charité, Franz Volhard Clinic, HELIOS Klinikum, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.

Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a systemic heritable disorder that affects the elastic tissue in the skin, eye, and cardiovascular system. Mutations in the ABCC6 gene cause PXE. We performed a mutation screen in ABCC6 using haplotype analysis in conjunction with direct sequencing to achieve a mutation detection rate of 97%. This screen consisted of 170 PXE chromosomes in 81 families, and detected 59 distinct mutations (32 missense, eight nonsense, and six likely splice-site point mutations; one small insertion; and seven small and five large deletions). Forty-three of these mutations are novel variants, which increases the total number of PXE mutations to 121. While most mutations are rare, three nonsense mutations, a splice donor site mutation, and the large deletion comprising exons 23-29 (c.2996_4208del) were identified as relatively frequent PXE mutations at 26%, 5%, 3.5%, 3%, and 11%, respectively. Chromosomal haplotyping with two proximal and two distal polymorphic markers flanking ABCC6 demonstrated that most chromosomes that carry these relatively frequent PXE mutations have related haplotypes specific for these mutations, which suggests that these chromosomes originate from single founder mutations. The types of mutations found support loss-of-function as the molecular mechanism for the PXE phenotype. In 76 of the 81 families, the affected individuals were either homozygous for the same mutation or compound heterozygous for two mutations. In the remaining five families with one uncovered mutation, affected showed allelic compound heterozygosity for the cosegregating PXE haplotype. This demonstrates pseudo-dominance as the relevant inheritance mechanism, since disease transmission to the next generation always requires one mutant allelic variant from each parent. In contrast to other previous clinical and molecular claims, our results show evidence only for recessive PXE. This has profound consequences for the genetic counseling of families with PXE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.20206DOI Listing
September 2005

In silico genetics: identification of a functional element regulating H2-Ealpha gene expression.

Science 2004 Oct;306(5696):690-5

Department of Genetics and Genomics, Roche Palo Alto, 3431 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304-1397, USA.

Computational tools can markedly accelerate the rate at which murine genetic models can be analyzed. We developed a computational method for mapping phenotypic traits that vary among inbred strains onto haplotypic blocks. This method correctly predicted the genetic basis for strain-specific differences in several biologically important traits. It was also used to identify an allele-specific functional genomic element regulating H2-Ealpha gene expression. This functional element, which contained the binding sites for YY1 and a second transcription factor that is probably serum response factor, is located within the first intron of the H2-Ealpha gene. This computational method will greatly improve our ability to identify the genetic basis for a variety of phenotypic traits, ranging from qualitative trait information to quantitative gene expression data, which vary among inbred mouse strains.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1100636DOI Listing
October 2004

A defect in a novel ADAMTS family member is the cause of the belted white-spotting mutation.

Development 2003 Oct;130(19):4665-72

Genetics Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02476, USA.

Several features of the pigment defect in belted (bt) mutant mice suggest that it occurs as a result of a defect in melanocyte development that is unique from those described for other classical white-spotting mutations. We report here that bt mice carry mutations in Adamts20, a novel member of the ADAMTS family of secreted metalloproteases. Adamts20 shows a highly dynamic pattern of expression in the developing embryo that generally precedes the appearance of melanoblasts in the same region, and is not expressed in the migrating cells themselves. Adamts20 shows remarkable homology with GON-1, an ADAMTS family protease required for distal tip cell migration in C. elegans. Our results suggest that the role of ADAMTS proteases in the regulation of cell migration has been conserved in mammalian development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.00668DOI Listing
October 2003

Pharmacogenetic analysis of adverse drug effect reveals genetic variant for susceptibility to liver toxicity.

Pharmacogenomics J 2002 ;2(5):327-34

F Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland.

A retrospective pharmacogenetic study was conducted to identify possible genetic susceptibility factors in patients in whom the administration of the anti-Parkinson drug, tolcapone (TASMAR), was associated with hepatic toxicity. We studied 135 cases of patients with elevated liver transaminase levels (ELT) of >/=1.5 times above the upper limit of normal, in comparison with matched controls that had also received the drug but had not experienced ELT. DNA samples were genotyped for 30 previously described or newly characterized bi-allelic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), representing 12 candidate genes selected based on the known metabolic pathways involved in the tolcapone elimination. SNPs located within the UDP-glucuronosyl transferase 1A gene complex, which codes for the enzymes involved in the main elimination pathway of the drug, were found to be significantly associated with the occurrence of tolcapone-associated ELTs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.tpj.6500123DOI Listing
May 2003