Publications by authors named "Donald McNaughton"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Determination of the "Privileged Structure" of 8-Hydroxyquinoline.

Chemphyschem 2021 08 7;22(16):1692-1697. Epub 2021 Jul 7.

Gottfried-Wilhelm-Leibniz-Universität, Institut für Physikalische Chemie & Elektrochemie, Callinstraße 3a, 30167, Hannover, Germany.

An accurate semi-experimental equilibrium structure of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) has been determined combining experiment and theory. The cm-wave rotational spectrum of 8-HQ was recorded in a pulsed supersonic jet using broadband dual-path reflection and narrowband Fabry-Perot-type resonator Fourier-transform microwave spectrometers. Accurate rotational and quartic centrifugal distortion constants and N quadrupole coupling constants are determined. Rotational constants of all C, O and N singly substituted isotopologues in natural abundance and those of a chemically synthesized OD isotopologue were used to obtain geometric parameters for all the heavy atoms and the hydroxyl hydrogen from a number of structure determination models. Theoretical approaches allowed for the determination of a semi-experimental equilibrium structure, in which computed rovibrational and electronic corrections were utilized to convert vibrational ground state constants into equilibrium constants. Despite the molecule having only a horizontal plane of symmetry and possessing 11 individual heavy atoms, microwave spectroscopy has allowed for a reliable and accurate structure determination. A mass dependent, structure was determined and proved to be equally reliable by comparison with the B3LYP-D3(BJ)/aVTZ equilibrium structure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cphc.202100384DOI Listing
August 2021

Fourier-Transform Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy and Laser Ablation -ICPMS New Vistas for Biochemical Analyses of Ischemic Stroke in Rat Brain.

Front Neurosci 2018 19;12:647. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

Department of Chemistry and Earth Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.

Stroke is the main cause of adult disability in the world, leaving more than half of the patients dependent on daily assistance. Understanding the post-stroke biochemical and molecular changes are critical for patient survival and stroke management. The aim of this work was to investigate the photo-thrombotic ischemic stroke in male rats with particular focus on biochemical and elemental changes in the primary stroke lesion in the somatosensory cortex and surrounding areas, including the corpus callosum. FT-IR imaging spectroscopy and LA-ICPMS techniques examined stroke brain samples, which were compared with standard immunohistochemistry studies. The FTIR results revealed that in the lesioned gray matter the relative distribution of lipid, lipid acyl and protein contents decreased significantly. Also at this locus, there was a significant increase in aggregated protein as detected by high-levels Aβ. Areas close to the stroke focus experienced decrease in the lipid and lipid acyl contents associated with an increase in lipid ester, olefin, and methyl bio-contents with a novel finding of Aβ in the PL-GM and L-WM. Elemental analyses realized major changes in the different brain structures that may underscore functionality. In conclusion, FTIR bio-spectroscopy is a non-destructive, rapid, and a refined technique to characterize oxidative stress markers associated with lipid degradation and protein denaturation not characterized by routine approaches. This technique may expedite research into stroke and offer new approaches for neurodegenerative disorders. The results suggest that a good therapeutic strategy should include a mechanism that provides protective effect from brain swelling (edema) and neurotoxicity by scavenging the lipid peroxidation end products.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2018.00647DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6157330PMC
September 2018

Characterisation of β-carotene partitioning in protein emulsions: Effects of pre-treatments, solid fat content and emulsifier type.

Food Chem 2018 Aug 9;257:361-367. Epub 2018 Mar 9.

CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Werribee, Victoria 3030, Australia. Electronic address:

Understanding the bioactive partitioning between the phases of an emulsion system underpins strategies for improving the efficiency of bioactive protection against degradation. We analysed partitioning of β-carotene in emulsions with various formulations in-situ using confocal Raman microscopy (CRM). The partitioning of β-carotene into the aqueous phase of emulsions increased when whey protein isolate (WPI) was heat or high pressure-treated prior to emulsion formation. However, increasing the concentration of high pressure-treated WPI reduced the β-carotene partitioning into the aqueous phase. Increasing the solid fat content in the carrier oil favoured the migration of β-carotene into the aqueous phase. The use of WPI as the emulsifier resulted in a greater partitioning of β-carotene into the aqueous phase compared to when Tween 40 was the emulsifier. This study demonstrates that partitioning of β-carotene between the aqueous and oil phase is dependent on the characteristics of the oil phase, emulsifier type and processing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2018.03.027DOI Listing
August 2018

The characterisation of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy.

Int J Mol Sci 2013 Aug 26;14(9):17453-76. Epub 2013 Aug 26.

Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia.

Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy shows potential as a benign, objective and rapid tool to screen pluripotent and multipotent stem cells for clinical use. It offers a new experimental approach that provides a holistic measurement of macromolecular composition such that a signature representing the internal cellular phenotype is obtained. The use of this technique therefore contributes information that is complementary to that acquired by conventional genetic and immunohistochemical methods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms140917453DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3794735PMC
August 2013

Type II collagen-specific antibodies induce cartilage damage in mice independent of inflammation.

Arthritis Rheum 2013 Mar;65(3):650-9

Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: Murine collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA), like collagen-induced arthritis, has clinical and immunopathologic features that parallel those in human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was undertaken to examine the effects of autoantibodies to type II collagen (CII) on articular cartilage in the paws of mice, under conditions in which other factors that may influence joint pathology could be excluded.

Methods: Mice of 2 different strains, B10.QC5δ and the parental strain B10.Q, were injected intravenously with either saline or arthritogenic monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to CII. B10.QC5δ mice lack complement factor C5 and do not develop CAIA when injected with arthritogenic mAb, whereas B10.Q mice have C5 and develop CAIA when administered the mAb and a subsequent injection of lipopolysaccharide. Three days after injection the paws of the mice were examined by standard histologic methods to assess morphologic appearance and proteoglycan loss, and by synchrotron-enhanced Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy to assess chemical evidence of structural change.

Results: No macroscopic or microscopic signs of inflammation were evident in the mice. However, in contrast to the saline-injected controls, all mAb-injected mice exhibited cartilage damage in all joints, with loss of proteoglycans and collagen, chondrocyte hyperplasia and/or loss, and surface damage in the interphalangeal joints.

Conclusion: The implication of these findings is that an autoimmune response to CII can disrupt articular cartilage, particularly that of the small joints, and the subsequent integrity of the cartilage depends on a balance between breakdown and repair. This has relevance with regard to RA, in which such autoantibodies occur but the inflammatory response may dominate clinically and mask underlying features of the autoimmune response.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.37805DOI Listing
March 2013

The application of Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy for the study of diseased central nervous system tissue.

Neuroimage 2012 Feb 18;59(4):3624-40. Epub 2011 Nov 18.

Multiple Sclerosis Research Group, Monash Immunology and Stem Cell Laboratories, Monash University, Wellington Road, Victoria 3800, Australia.

In the last two decades the field of infrared spectroscopy has seen enormous advances in both instrumentation and the development of bioinformatic methods for spectral analysis, allowing the examination of a large variety of healthy and diseased samples, including biological fluids, isolated cells, whole tissues, and tissue sections. The non-destructive nature of the technique, together with the ability to directly probe biochemical changes without the addition of stains or contrast agents, enables a range of complementary analyses. This review focuses on the application of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy to analyse central nervous system tissues, with the aim of understanding the biochemical and structural changes associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, multiple sclerosis, as well as brain tumours. Modern biospectroscopic methods that combine FTIR microspectroscopy with bioinformatic analysis constitute a powerful new methodology that can discriminate pathology from normal healthy tissue in a rapid, unbiased fashion, with high sensitivity and specificity. Notably, the ability to detect protein secondary structural changes associated with Alzheimer's plaques, neurons in Parkinson's disease, and in some spectra from meningioma, as well as in the animal models of Alzheimer's disease, transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, and multiple sclerosis, illustrates the power of this technology. The capacity to offer insight into the biochemical and structural changes underpinning aetio-pathogenesis of diseases in tissues provides both a platform to investigate early pathologies occurring in a variety of experimentally induced and naturally occurring central nervous system diseases, and the potential to evaluate new therapeutic approaches.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.11.033DOI Listing
February 2012

Specific antibody protection of the extracellular cartilage matrix against collagen antibody-induced damage.

Arthritis Rheum 2010 Nov;62(11):3374-84

Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: The type II collagen (CII)-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) M2139 and CIIC1 induce arthritis in vivo and degrade bovine cartilage explants in vitro, whereas mAb CIIF4 is nonarthritogenic and prevents arthritis development when given in combination with M2139 and CIIC1. To determine the nature of the protective capacity of CIIF4 antibody, we examined the effects of adding CIIF4 to cartilage explants cultured in vitro with M2139 and CIIC1.

Methods: Bovine cartilage explants were cultured in the presence of M2139 and CIIC1, with or without CIIF4. Histologic changes were examined, and chemical changes to collagens and proteoglycans were assessed by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). Fresh cartilage and cartilage that had been freeze-thawed to kill chondrocytes cultured with or without the addition of GM6001, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), were compared using FTIRM analysis.

Results: M2139 and CIIC1 caused progressive degradation of the cartilage surface and loss of CII, even in the absence of viable chondrocytes. CIIF4 did not cause cartilage damage, and when given with the arthritogenic mAb, it prevented their damage and permitted matrix regeneration, a process that required viable chondrocytes. Inhibition of MMP activity reduced cartilage damage but did not mimic the effects of CIIF4.

Conclusion: CII-reactive antibodies can cause cartilage damage or can be protective in vivo and in vitro, depending on their epitope specificity. Since CII antibodies of similar specificity also occur in rheumatoid arthritis in humans, more detailed studies should unravel the regulatory mechanisms operating at the effector level of arthritis pathogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.27671DOI Listing
November 2010
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