Publications by authors named "Dominika Salamon"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Analysis of the Gut Mycobiome in Adult Patients with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) with Increased Sensitivity-Pilot Study.

Nutrients 2021 Mar 25;13(4). Epub 2021 Mar 25.

Department of Molecular Medical Microbiology, Chair of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 18 Czysta Street, 31-121 Krakow, Poland.

The studies on microbiome in the human digestive tract indicate that fungi could also be one of the external factors affecting development of diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quantitative and qualitative mycobiome composition in the colon of the adults with type 1 (T1D), = 26 and type 2 (T2D) diabetes, = 24 compared to the control group, = 26. The gut mycobiome was characterized in the stool samples using the analysis of the whole internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the fungal rDNA gene cluster by next-generation sequencing (NGS) with increased sensitivity. At the L2 (phylum) level, Basidiomycota fungi were predominant in all 3 study groups. Group T1D presented significantly lower number of Ascomycota compared to the T2D group, and at the L6 (genus) level, the T1D group presented significantly lower number of genus compared to control and T2D groups. In the T1D group, a significant positive correlation between total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and fungi of the genus and in the T2D group, a negative correlation between the total cholesterol level and genus was found. The obtained results seem to be a good foundation to extend the analysis of the relationship between individual genera and species of fungi and the parameters determining the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids in the human body.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13041066DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8064496PMC
March 2021

Quantitative changes in selected bacteria in the stool during the treatment of Crohn's disease.

Adv Med Sci 2020 Sep 23;65(2):348-353. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

Jagiellonian University Medical College, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Krakow, Poland. Electronic address:

Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine quantitative changes in selected species of bacteria (Bacteroides fragilis, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Serratia marcescens) in the stool of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) in the course of induction treatment with exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) or anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (Infliximab, IFX) vs. healthy controls (HC).

Materials/methods: DNA was isolated from stool samples of CD (n = 122) and HC (n = 17), and quantitative real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) was applied. In both treatment groups, the first stool sample was taken before the start of treatment, and the second 4 weeks after its end: in EEN (n = 48; age (mean; SD) 13.35 ± 3.09 years) and IFX groups (n = 13; age (mean; SD) 13.09 ± 3.76 years).

Results: The only species that showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups of patients before any therapeutic intervention was L. fermentum. Moreover, its number increased after completion of EEN and differed significantly when compared with the HC. In the IFX group the number of L. fermentum decreased during the therapy but was significantly higher than in the HC. The number of S. marcescens in the EEN group was significantly lower than in the controls both before and after EEN.

Conclusion: The implemented treatment (EEN or IFX) modifies the microbiome in CD patients, but does not make it become the same as in HC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.advms.2020.06.003DOI Listing
September 2020

Classical Microbiological Diagnostics of Bacteremia: Are the Negative Results Really Negative? What is the Laboratory Result Telling Us About the "Gold Standard"?

Microorganisms 2020 Feb 29;8(3). Epub 2020 Feb 29.

Department of Molecular Medical Microbiology, Chair of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 31-121 Krakow, Poland.

Standard blood cultures require at least 24-120 h to be reported as preliminary positive. The objective of this study was to compare the reliability of Gram staining and fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) for detecting bacteria in otherwise negative blood culture bottles. Ninety-six sets were taken from patients with a diagnosis of sepsis. Six incomplete blood culture sets and eight blood cultures sets demonstrating positive growth were excluded. We performed Gram stain and FISH on 82 sets taken from post-operative septic patients: 82 negative aerobic blood cultures, 82 anaerobic blood cultures, and 82 blood samples, as well as 57 blood samples taken from healthy volunteers. From the eighty-two blood sets analyzed from the septic patients, Gram stain visualized bacteria in 62.2% of blood samples, 35.4% of the negative aerobic bottles, and in 31.7% of the negative anaerobic bottles. Utilizing FISH, we detected bacteria in 75.6%, 56.1%, and 64.6% respectively. Among the blood samples from healthy volunteers, FISH detected bacteria in 64.9%, while Gram stain detected bacteria in only 38.6%. The time needed to obtain the study results using Gram stain was 1 h, for FISH 4 h, and for the culture method, considering the duration of growth, 5 days. Gram stain and FISH allow quick detection of bacteria in the blood taken directly from a patient. Finding phagocytosed bacteria, which were also detected among healthy individuals, confirms the hypothesis that blood microbiome exists.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8030346DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7143506PMC
February 2020

Metagenomic Analysis of Duodenal Microbiota Reveals a Potential Biomarker of Dysbiosis in the Course of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study.

J Clin Med 2020 Jan 29;9(2). Epub 2020 Jan 29.

Department of Molecular Medical Microbiology, Chair of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 31-121 Krakow, Poland.

Numerous scientific studies confirm that, apart from environmental and genetic factors, a significant role is played by gastrointestinal microbiota in the aetiology of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Currently, scientists mainly focus on the distal intestinal microbiota, while the equally important proximal parts of the intestine are overlooked. The aim of the study was a qualitative analysis of the structure of the duodenal mucosa microbiota in groups of patients with obesity and with type 2 diabetes and where obesity qualified for bariatric surgery: sleeve gastrectomy. The microbiological results obtained were compared with some clinical parameters. As a result, it was possible to determine the microbiological core that the treatment and control groups had in common, including phyla: Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria. The patients with obesity and with type 2 diabetes and obesity presented a significantly lower number of genus compared to healthy subjects. Furthermore, the numbers of were positively correlated with the high density lipoprotein (HDL) concentration in the groups under study. The obtained results indicate that bacteria of the genus should be considered in the future in the context of a potential biomarker in the progress of type 2 diabetes and obesity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm9020369DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7074165PMC
January 2020

Evidence for Infections by the Same Strain of Beta 2-toxigenic Type A Acquired in One Hospital Ward.

Pol J Microbiol 2019 Sep 3;68(3):323-329. Epub 2019 Sep 3.

Department of Molecular Medical Microbiology, Chair of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College , Krakow , Poland.

This study conducts a comparative phenotypic and genetic analysis of strains isolated from two patients hospitalized at the same time in 2017 in the surgical ward of the Provincial Specialist Hospital in Włocławek (Kujawsko-Pomorskie Province) who developed necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI). To explain the recurring cases of this infection, a comparative analysis was performed for these strains and the ones originating from infections recorded at the same hospital in three patients with gas gangrene in 2015. The two isolates studied in 2017 (8554/M/17 from patient No. 1 and 8567/M/17 from patient No. 2) had identical biochemical profiles. A comparison of research results using multiplex PCR from 2017 with a genetic analysis of strains from 2015 enabled us to demonstrate that the strains currently studied have the genes encoding the same toxins (α and β2) as the two strains analyzed in 2015: no. 7143 (patient No. 3) and no. 7149 (patient No. 2). A comparative analysis of the strain profiles obtained with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in 2017 with the results from 2015 has found one identical and genetically unique restriction profile, corresponding to one clone of comprising of two strains: no. 8567/M/17 (patient No. 2 in 2017) and no. 7143 (patient No. 3 in 2015). The epidemiological data and detailed analysis of the course of both events suggest that this clone of possibly survived in adverse conditions of the external environment in the operating block of this hospital for many months.

This study conducts a comparative phenotypic and genetic analysis of strains isolated from two patients hospitalized at the same time in 2017 in the surgical ward of the Provincial Specialist Hospital in Włocławek (Kujawsko-Pomorskie Province) who developed necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI). To explain the recurring cases of this infection, a comparative analysis was performed for these strains and the ones originating from infections recorded at the same hospital in three patients with gas gangrene in 2015. The two isolates studied in 2017 (8554/M/17 from patient No. 1 and 8567/M/17 from patient No. 2) had identical biochemical profiles. A comparison of research results using multiplex PCR from 2017 with a genetic analysis of strains from 2015 enabled us to demonstrate that the strains currently studied have the genes encoding the same toxins (α and β2) as the two strains analyzed in 2015: no. 7143 (patient No. 3) and no. 7149 (patient No. 2). A comparative analysis of the strain profiles obtained with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in 2017 with the results from 2015 has found one identical and genetically unique restriction profile, corresponding to one clone of comprising of two strains: no. 8567/M/17 (patient No. 2 in 2017) and no. 7143 (patient No. 3 in 2015). The epidemiological data and detailed analysis of the course of both events suggest that this clone of possibly survived in adverse conditions of the external environment in the operating block of this hospital for many months.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.33073/pjm-2019-035DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7256698PMC
September 2019

Dependence of Colonization of the Large Intestine by on the Treatment of Crohn's Disease.

Pol J Microbiol 2019 ;68(1):121-126

Department of Molecular Medical Microbiology, Chair of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College , Krakow , Poland.

The aim of this study was to determine if there are quantitative differences in fungi between pediatric patients with Crohn's disease (before and after exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN), and the biologic therapy with anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha - (IFX)), and healthy controls. DNA was isolated from fecal samples and PCR was used to determine the number of fungal cells. Both therapeutic interventions resulted in a statistically significant decrease in Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index. The numbers of decreased during both therapeutic intervention but the difference was statistically significant for the IFX intervention only ( = 0.045). Moreover, fungi population in both study groups declined during intervention when compared to the control group but the difference was significant before treatment only in the IFX group ( = 0.013). The total distribution of with both IFX and EEN as well as in the control group differed significantly ( = 0.01) before treatment only. No correlation between the numbers of and disease activity as well as the following biochemical parameters: serum iron concentration, protein or glucose level were found. It cannot be ruled out that, in combination with genetic and immunological disorders, fungi can contribute to the initiation of the disease process and perpetuation of active inflammation.

The aim of this study was to determine if there are quantitative differences in fungi between pediatric patients with Crohn’s disease (before and after exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN), and the biologic therapy with anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha – (IFX)), and healthy controls. DNA was isolated from fecal samples and PCR was used to determine the number of fungal cells. Both therapeutic interventions resulted in a statistically significant decrease in Pediatric Crohn’s Disease Activity Index. The numbers of decreased during both therapeutic intervention but the difference was statistically significant for the IFX intervention only ( = 0.045). Moreover, fungi population in both study groups declined during intervention when compared to the control group but the difference was significant before treatment only in the IFX group ( = 0.013). The total distribution of with both IFX and EEN as well as in the control group differed significantly ( = 0.01) before treatment only. No correlation between the numbers of and disease activity as well as the following biochemical parameters: serum iron concentration, protein or glucose level were found. It cannot be ruled out that, in combination with genetic and immunological disorders, fungi can contribute to the initiation of the disease process and perpetuation of active inflammation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21307/pjm-2019-014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7256697PMC
May 2019

Comparison of PCR, Fluorescent in Situ Hybridization and Blood Cultures for Detection of Bacteremia in Children and Adolescents During Antibiotic Therapy.

Pol J Microbiol 2018;67(4):479-486

Chair of Microbiology, Department of Molecular Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College , Cracow , Poland.

The gold standard in microbiological diagnostics of bacteremia is a blood culture in automated systems. This method may take several days and has low sensitivity. New screening methods that could quickly reveal the presence of bacteria would be extremely useful. The objective of this study was to estimate the effectiveness of these methods with respect to blood cultures in the context of antibiotic therapy. Blood samples from 92 children with sepsis were analyzed. Blood cultures were carried out in standard automated systems. Subsequently, FISH (Fluorescent In-Situ Hybridization) and nested multiplex-real-time-PCR (PCR) were performed. Blood cultures, FISH and PCR yielded positive results in 18%, 39.1%, and 71.7% of samples, respectively. Significant differences were found between the results obtained through culture before and after induction of antibiotherapy: 25.5% vs. 9.7%. There was no significant difference in FISH and PCR results in relation to antibiotics. The three methods employed demonstrated significant differences in detecting bacteria effectively. Time to obtain test results for FISH and PCR averaged 4-5 hours. FISH and PCR allow to detect bacteria in blood without prior culture. These methods had high sensitivity for the detection of bacteremia regardless of antibiotherapy. They provide more timely results as compared to automated blood culture, and may be useful as rapid screening tests in sepsis.

The gold standard in microbiological diagnostics of bacteremia is a blood culture in automated systems. This method may take several days and has low sensitivity. New screening methods that could quickly reveal the presence of bacteria would be extremely useful. The objective of this study was to estimate the effectiveness of these methods with respect to blood cultures in the context of antibiotic therapy. Blood samples from 92 children with sepsis were analyzed. Blood cultures were carried out in standard automated systems. Subsequently, FISH (Fluorescent In-Situ Hybridization) and nested multiplex-real-time-PCR (PCR) were performed. Blood cultures, FISH and PCR yielded positive results in 18%, 39.1%, and 71.7% of samples, respectively. Significant differences were found between the results obtained through culture before and after induction of antibiotherapy: 25.5% vs. 9.7%. There was no significant difference in FISH and PCR results in relation to antibiotics. The three methods employed demonstrated significant differences in detecting bacteria effectively. Time to obtain test results for FISH and PCR averaged 4–5 hours. FISH and PCR allow to detect bacteria in blood without prior culture. These methods had high sensitivity for the detection of bacteremia regardless of antibiotherapy. They provide more timely results as compared to automated blood culture, and may be useful as rapid screening tests in sepsis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21307/pjm-2018-056DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7256870PMC
June 2019

Characteristics of gut microbiota in adult patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes based on next‑generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene fragment.

Pol Arch Intern Med 2018 06 15;128(6):336-343. Epub 2018 Apr 15.

Introduction Scientific data indicate a possible influence of gut microbiota on the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and T2DM, respectively). Sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA identified several hundred bacterial species of the intestinal ecosystem, most of which cannot be cultured. Objectives We aimed to evaluate gut microbiota composition in adult patients with T1DM and T2DM and establish a link between microbiological test results and patients' clinical data. Patients and methods We examined DNA isolated from fecal samples in 3 groups: healthy volunteers (n = 23), patients with T1DM (n = 22), and patients with T2DM (n = 23). Next‑generation sequencing was performed on the MiSeq platform. Results At the phylum level, the Firmicutes bacteria prevailed (>77%) in all groups. At the taxonomic levels L2 (phylum) and L6 (genus), significant differences were demonstrated in bacterial profiles, particularly in the T2DM group. A negative correlation was observed between several genera of bacteria and the percentage of glycated hemoglobin A1c in the T2DM group, while a positive correlation was revealed between bacteria belonging to the genus Bifidobacterium and high‑density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in both T1DM and T2DM groups. Conclusions Our results provide grounds for conducting research in the field of gut microbiota in order to develop individualized therapy for patients with diabetes based on modifying the microbiota composition, as a new method for controlling glycemia. Next‑generation sequencing allows a rapid identification of the DNA of all bacteria present in the sample and their taxonomic classification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.20452/pamw.4246DOI Listing
June 2018

Nested-PCR real time as alternative molecular tool for detection of Borrelia burgdorferi compared to the classical serological diagnosis of the blood.

Med Dosw Mikrobiol 2016;68(1):47-56

Introduction: Lyme disease, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, is a multisystem disease that often makes difficulties to recognize caused by their genetic heterogenity. Currently, the gold standard for the detection of Lyme disease (LD) is serologic diagnostics based mainly on tests: ELISA and Western blot (WB). These methods, however, are subject to consider- able defect, especially in the initial phase of infection due to the occurrence of so-called serological window period and low specificity. For this reason, they might be replaced by molecular methods, for example polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which should be more sensitivity and specificity. In the present study we attempt to optimize the PCR reaction conditions and enhance existing test sensitivity by applying the equivalent of real time PCR - nested PCR for detection B. burgdorferi DNA in the patient's blood.

Methods: The study involved 94 blood samples of patients with suspected LD. From each sample, 1.5 ml of blood was used for the isolation of bacterial DNA and PCR real time am- plification and its equivalent, in nested version. The remaining part earmarked for serologi- cal testing. Optimization of the reaction conditions made experimentally, using gradient of the temperature and gradient of the magnesium ions concentration for reaction real time in nested-PCR and PCR version.

Results: The results show that the nested-PCR real time, has a much higher sensitivity 45 (47.8%) of positive results for the detection of B. burgdorferi compared to the single- variety, without a preceding pre-amplification 2 (2.1%). Serological methods allowed the detection of infection in 41 (43.6%) samples.

Conclusions: These results support of the nested PCR method as a better molecular tool for the detection of B. burgdorferi infection than classical PCR real time reaction. The nested-PCR real time method may be considered as a complement to ELISA and WB mainly in the early stages of infection, when in the blood circulating B. burgdorferi cells. By contrast, the results of serological and molecular tests should always be carried out tak- ing into account the patient's clinical status.
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March 2017

Qualitative Parameters of the Colonic Flora in Patients with HNF1A-MODY Are Different from Those Observed in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

J Diabetes Res 2016 11;2016:3876764. Epub 2016 Oct 11.

Department of Metabolic Diseases, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 15 Kopernika Street, 31-501 Kraków, Poland; University Hospital, 36 Kopernika Street, 31-501 Kraków, Poland.

. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is determined by genetic and environmental factors. There have been many studies on the relationship between the composition of the gastrointestinal bacterial flora, T2DM, and obesity. There are no data, however, on the gut microbiome structure in monogenic forms of the disease including Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY). . The aim of the investigation was to compare the qualitative parameters of the colonic flora in patients with HNF1AMODY and T2DM and healthy individuals. 16S sequencing of bacterial DNA isolated from the collected fecal samples using the MiSeq platform was performed. . There were significant between-group differences in the bacterial profile. At the phylum level, the amount of Proteobacteria was higher ( = 0.0006) and the amount of Bacteroidetes was lower ( = 0.0005) in T2DM group in comparison to the control group. In HNF1A-MODY group, the frequency of Bacteroidetes was lower than in the control group ( = 0.0143). At the order level, Turicibacterales was more abundant in HNF1A-MODY group than in T2DM group. . It appears that there are differences in the gut microbiome composition between patients with HNF1A-MODY and type 2 diabetes. Further investigation on this matter should be conducted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3876764DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5078663PMC
June 2017

The level of knowledge about parasitic diseases and the threats resulting from their presence in the environment evaluated in a group of parents of preschool children.

Ann Parasitol 2015 ;61(2):109-14

Chair of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Czysta 18, 31-121 Krakow; Poland.

Despite a significant civilization advancement, parasitic diseases still pose a serious diagnostic and therapeutic problem. Children's susceptibility to these infections stems from their immature immune system and lack of basic hygiene routines. The objective of the study was to evaluate the level of knowledge which parents of preschool children's possess about parasitic diseases in their children's environment. The study was carried out in the group of 151 parents of preschool children living both in the city and in the country. The survey was carried out by means of a diagnostic poll with the application of a self-designed research questionnaire. To make the evaluation even more objective, a special scale was created in which parents could score points for their answers (0 - wrong answer, 1 - correct answer). The total number of points ranging from 0 to 9 indicated an unsatisfactory level of knowledge, from 10 to 13 - satisfactory level, from 14 to 16 - good level and from 17 to 20 - very good level of parents' awareness. The results of the study reveal that the level of parents' knowledge about parasitic diseases is only satisfactory. A statistically significant relationship was observed between the variables such as education and sex. The higher education, the higher level of knowledge. Moreover, women were more knowledgeable in the field of parasitic diseases than men were. Financial status of the family did not influence the level of parents' awareness. Well-planned educational programmes might have a positive influence on developing proper hygiene routines in families, which, in turn, will limit the risk of spreading parasitoses in the population of children.
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October 2015

Toxoplasma gondii and women of reproductive age: an analysis of data from the Chair of Microbiology, Jagiellonian University Medical College in Cracow.

Ann Parasitol 2014 ;60(4):291-6

The aim of the study is to determine the seroprevalence and risk factors for Toxoplasma gondii infection in women of reproductive age within the Małopolska province who were examined in the Laboratory of Microbiological Diagnostics, Chair of Microbiology in Cracow in 2013-2014. Seventy-eight questionnaires completed by women of reproductive age (mean age 29.91±6.56) were analysed. In total, 82% of respondents signed up for serological testing while already pregnant (33 patients in the age group 18-29 years and 30 patients in the age group 30-39 years). Twenty- seven percent had no previous contact with the parasite. A statistically significant (chi-square=7.722, p=0.005) correlation between permanent residence in the countryside and the presence of anti-T. gondii antibodies was found. A significant correlation was shown in the studied group between a lack of contact with soil and negative results of serological tests for toxoplasmosis (chi-square=4.116, p=0.042). The majority of the surveyed women had already encountered this parasite. It seems that special attention should be given to rural women. Implementation of more precise testing in the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis is also essential.
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March 2015

Quantitative evaluation of fungi of the genus Candida in the feces of adult patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes - a pilot study.

Gut Pathog 2014 15;6(1):43. Epub 2014 Oct 15.

Department of Microbiology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 18 Czysta St, 31-121 Krakow, Poland.

Background: Gastrointestinal tract microbiota, particularly bacterial microflora, seem to have a different qualitative and quantitative composition in both type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) mellitus cases as compared to non-diabetic individuals. So far, there are no data from diabetes research concerning the prevalence of fungi, particularly the most common genus, i.e. Candida, which are important components of human colon microflora. We aimed to examine whether there are quantitative changes of Candida fungi in the feces of patients with T1DM and T2DM as compared to healthy controls.

Findings: Overall, we included 44 diabetic patients (27 patients with T1DM and 17 with T2DM) as well as 17 healthy, non-diabetic controls. Feces and blood samples were collected from all study individuals. DNA was isolated from fecal samples and quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) was applied in order to determine the number of fungal cells. Statistical association with selected clinical and biochemical features was examined. There was a difference in the amount of Candida in the feces among the three examined groups (p = 0.007). Candida spp. populations in T1DM and T2DM subjects were larger as compared to controls (p = 0.017 and p = 0.037, respectively). However, no difference was found between T1DM and T2DM. No association was identified between the quantity of fungi and examined patients' characteristics, except for negative correlation with blood lipid parameters in T2DM group.

Conclusions: Candida fungi appear to be more prevalent in the feces of patients with T1DM and T2DM. Their amount seems to be associated with serum lipids in T2DM patients. This initial finding requires further confirmation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13099-014-0043-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4201707PMC
October 2014

[Malaria--a tropical disease imported to Poland--case report].

Przegl Epidemiol 2009 ;63(2):317-9

Klinika Chorób Zakaźnych Katedry Gastroenterologii, Hepatologii i Chorób Zakaźnych Collegium Medicum Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego w Krakowie.

We present a case of severe malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum in a 54 year-old woman who stayed for a few of days in Western Africa. Following the case presentation the nature, the course, the diagnosis, the treatment and the prevention of malaria were discussed.
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November 2009

Levels of sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 in patients with lyme disease.

Pol Arch Med Wewn 2009 Apr;119(4):200-4

Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland.

Introduction: Lyme disease is a multi-organ animal-borne disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb).

Objectives: As the pathogenesis of Lyme borreliosis is not fully understood, the study has been designed to examine levels of soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) in serum and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with Lyme borreliosis and their associations with clinical signs and symptoms and anti-Borrelia burgdorferi (anti-Bb) antibody titers.

Patients And Methods: Sixty-four patients were enrolled in the study, including 39 patients treated for Lyme borreliosis and 25 without the disease (control group). In both groups sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 levels were determined in serum and the CSF.

Results: Mean serum sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 levels were higher in patients with Lyme borreliosis than in the control group. Serum sICAM-1 levels were significantly lower among patients with results positive for immunoglobulin M seroreactivity with Bb than among those with negative antibody responses. In patients with Bb-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies, significantly higher serum sICAM-1 levels were found. Higher sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 levels in the CSF were observed in patients positive for anti-Bb IgG antibody titers in the CSF.

Conclusions: In patients with Lyme borreliosis, endothelial cell activation results in elevated levels of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 in serum and the CSF.
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April 2009

[Analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi genostrains among patients with Lyme disease].

Przegl Lek 2009 ;66(9):511-2

Klinika Chorób Zakaźnych, Katedry Gastroenterologii, Hepatologii i Chorób Zakaźnych, Collegium Medicum, Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego w Krakowie.

Background: Lyme borreliosis is a zoonose which can be transmitted to the humans during Ixodes tick bite to the skin. The disease is caused by bacteria--spirochetes of the Borrelia species, classified as Borrelia burgdorferi strain. In Poland Lyme borreliosis is caused by Borrelia garinii, Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. The presence of Borrelia spielmani was recently reported.

Material And Methods: The study included 249 patients diagnozed in University Hospital in Krakow due to suspicion of Lyme borreliosis in 2005-2008. Results of serologic tests against borreliosis were analized using Elisa tests (Mikrogen), positive tests were confirmed using Western blot tests (Biomedica).

Results: It was found the high percentage of the antibodies in class IgM, which are important in acute phase of borreliosis, typical for Borrelia garinii, whereas in class IgG it was found the prevalence of protein typical for Borrelia afzellii and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. It was found the high prevalence of the presence VIsE reacting with IgG antibodies. It was noted the presence of Borrelia spielmani genostrain in Poland.
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January 2011

[A case of Salmonella paratyphi A infection in Poland].

Przegl Lek 2008 ;65(2):107-8

Katedra Gastroenterologii, Hepatologii i Chorób Zakaźnych Collegium Medicum Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego w Krakowie.

Paratyphoid fever is an acute infection caused by Salmonella paratyphi A, B or C. The disease is transmitted from person to person by fecal-oral way. Typical for typhoid fever are splenomegaly, bradycardia, fever, constipation or mild diarrhoea oftten associated with abdominal tenderness. We present the case of patient who was infected by Salmonella paratyphi C while his travelling in Asia.
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October 2008