Publications by authors named "Dominika Lukas"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Induction of Regulatory T Cells in Leishmania major‒Infected BALB/c Mice Does Not Require Langerin+ Dendritic Cells.

J Invest Dermatol 2021 Apr 14;141(4):936-938. Epub 2020 Sep 14.

Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jid.2020.04.033DOI Listing
April 2021

TGF-β inhibitor Smad7 regulates dendritic cell-induced autoimmunity.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2017 02 6;114(8):E1480-E1489. Epub 2017 Feb 6.

Institute for Molecular Medicine, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55131 Mainz, Germany;

TGF-β is an anti-inflammatory cytokine whose signaling is negatively controlled by Smad7. Previously, we established a role for Smad7 in the generation of autoreactive T cells; however, the function of Smad7 in dendritic cells (DCs) remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that DC-specific Smad7 deficiency resulted in elevated expression of the transcription factors Batf3 and IRF8, leading to increased frequencies of CD8CD103 DCs in the spleen. Furthermore, Smad7-deficient DCs expressed higher levels of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme associated with tolerance induction. Mice devoid of Smad7 specifically in DCs are resistant to the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as a result of an increase of protective regulatory T cells (Tregs) and reduction of encephalitogenic effector T cells in the central nervous system. In agreement, inhibition of IDO activity or depletion of Tregs restored disease susceptibility. Intriguingly, when Smad7-deficient DCs also lacked the IFN-γ receptor, the mice regained susceptibility to EAE, demonstrating that IFN-γ signaling in DCs mediates their tolerogenic function. Our data indicate that Smad7 expression governs splenic DC subset differentiation and is critical for the promotion of their efficient function in immunity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1615065114DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5338403PMC
February 2017

Dendritic cells as gatekeepers of tolerance.

Semin Immunopathol 2017 02 25;39(2):153-163. Epub 2016 Jul 25.

Institute for Molecular Medicine, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany.

Dendritic cells (DC) are unique hematopoietic cells, linking innate and adaptive immune responses. In particular, they are considered as the most potent antigen presenting cells, governing both T cell immunity and tolerance. In view of their exceptional ability to present antigen and to interact with T cells, DC play distinct roles in shaping T cell development, differentiation and function. The outcome of the DC-T cell interaction is determined by the state of DC maturation, the type of DC subset, the cytokine microenvironment and the tissue location. Both regulatory T cells (Tregs) and DC are indispensable for maintaining central and peripheral tolerance. Over the past decade, accumulating data indicate that DC critically contribute to Treg differentiation and homeostasis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00281-016-0583-zDOI Listing
February 2017

Dendritic cells ameliorate autoimmunity in the CNS by controlling the homeostasis of PD-1 receptor(+) regulatory T cells.

Immunity 2012 Aug 16;37(2):264-75. Epub 2012 Aug 16.

Institute for Molecular Medicine, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, 55131 Mainz, Germany.

Mature dendritic cells (DCs) are established as unrivaled antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the initiation of immune responses, whereas steady-state DCs induce peripheral T cell tolerance. Using various genetic approaches, we depleted CD11c(+) DCs in mice and induced autoimmune CNS inflammation. Unexpectedly, mice lacking DCs developed aggravated disease compared to control mice. Furthermore, when we engineered DCs to present a CNS-associated autoantigen in an induced manner, we found robust tolerance that prevented disease, which coincided with an upregulation of the PD-1 receptor on antigen-specific T cells. Additionally, we showed that PD-1 was necessary for DC-mediated induction of regulatory T cells. Our results show that a reduction of DCs interferes with tolerance, resulting in a stronger inflammatory response, and that other APC populations could compensate for the loss of immunogenic APC function in DC-depleted mice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2012.05.025DOI Listing
August 2012

A20 deficiency in B cells enhances B-cell proliferation and results in the development of autoantibodies.

Eur J Immunol 2011 Mar 10;41(3):595-601. Epub 2011 Feb 10.

Institute for Molecular Medicine, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg-University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany.

A20/TNFAIP3 is an ubiquitin-editing enzyme, important for the regulation of the NF-κB pathway. Mutations in the TNFAIP3 gene have been linked to different human autoimmune disorders. In human B-cell lymphomas, the inactivation of A20 results in constitutive NF-κB activation. Recent studies demonstrate that in mice the germline inactivation of A20 leads to early lethality, due to inflammation in multiple organs of the body. In this report, we describe a new mouse strain allowing for the tissue-specific deletion of A20. We show that B-cell-specific deletion of A20 results in a dramatic reduction in marginal zone B cells. Furthermore, A20-deficient B cells display a hyperactive phenotype represented by enhanced proliferation upon activation. Finally, these mice develop higher levels of serum immunoglobulins, resulting in an excessive production of self-reactive autoantibodies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eji.201041313DOI Listing
March 2011

Smad7 in T cells drives T helper 1 responses in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

Brain 2010 Apr 30;133(Pt 4):1067-81. Epub 2010 Mar 30.

Department of Neurology, University Medical Centre Regensburg, Universitätsstrasse 84, 93053 Regensburg, Germany.

Autoreactive CD4+ T lymphocytes play a vital role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Since the discovery of T helper 17 cells, there is an ongoing debate whether T helper 1, T helper 17 or both subtypes of T lymphocytes are important for the initiation of autoimmune neuroinflammation. We examined peripheral blood CD4+ cells from patients with active and stable relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, and used mice with conditional deletion or over-expression of the transforming growth factor-beta inhibitor Smad7, to delineate the role of Smad7 in T cell differentiation and autoimmune neuroinflammation. We found that Smad7 is up-regulated in peripheral CD4+ cells from patients with multiple sclerosis during relapse but not remission, and that expression of Smad7 strongly correlates with T-bet, a transcription factor defining T helper 1 responses. Concordantly, mice with transgenic over-expression of Smad7 in T cells developed an enhanced disease course during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, accompanied by elevated infiltration of inflammatory cells and T helper 1 responses in the central nervous system. On the contrary, mice with a T cell-specific deletion of Smad7 had reduced disease and central nervous system inflammation. Lack of Smad7 in T cells blunted T cell proliferation and T helper 1 responses in the periphery but left T helper 17 responses unaltered. Furthermore, frequencies of regulatory T cells were increased in the central nervous system of mice with a T cell-specific deletion and reduced in mice with a T cell-specific over-expression of Smad7. Downstream effects of transforming growth factor-beta on in vitro differentiation of naïve T cells to T helper 1, T helper 17 and regulatory T cell phenotypes were enhanced in T cells lacking Smad7. Finally, Smad7 was induced during T helper 1 differentiation and inhibited during T helper 17 differentiation. Taken together, the level of Smad7 in T cells determines T helper 1 polarization and regulates inflammatory cellular responses. Since a Smad7 deletion in T cells leads to immunosuppression, Smad7 may be a potential new therapeutic target in multiple sclerosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awq039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2850583PMC
April 2010