Publications by authors named "Dominic Sanderson"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The pharmacokinetics of conventional and bioenhanced tablet formulations of danirixin (GSK1325756) following oral administration in healthy, elderly, human volunteers.

Eur J Drug Metab Pharmacokinet 2014 Sep 7;39(3):173-81. Epub 2014 Feb 7.

Clinical Discovery, Respiratory Therapy Area Unit, GlaxoSmithKline R&D, 709 Swedeland Road, King of Prussia, PA, 19406, USA,

Danirixin (GSK1325756) is a small, high-affinity, selective and reversible CXCR2 antagonist in development for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The objective of the study was to evaluate the relative bioavailability, including the inter-subject variability, of a conventional immediate-release (IR) formulation and two prototype bioenhanced formulations of danirixin during gastric acid suppression in a healthy, elderly population. A single-centre, crossover study in healthy male and female volunteers aged 65-80 years was conducted. Subjects were randomised to receive danirixin 50 mg IR in the fed and fasted states and danirixin 50 mg Bioenhanced Formulation 1 and 2 in the fasted state. All subjects also received omeprazole 20 mg each morning beginning 4 days prior to the first treatment period and continuing through danirixin dosing in the final treatment period. Twenty subjects were randomised and completed the study. Bioenhanced Formulation 2 in the fasted state demonstrated the highest adjusted geometric means for AUC(0-t), AUC(0-inf), AUC(0-24) and C max. Danirixin IR demonstrated adjusted means that were higher in the fed state compared with the fasted state. For all formulations tested, there was substantial inter-subject variability (CVb >100 % for all formulations). The overall incidences of adverse events (AEs) were 10 % for danirixin IR (both in the fed and fasted states) and 15-20 % for the bioenhanced formulations. The majority of AEs were mild in intensity. There were no serious AEs. Concomitant use of omeprazole resulted in large inter-subject variability in the exposure to danirixin. Bioenhanced formulation strategies could not overcome the effect of omeprazole on exposure and variability between subjects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13318-014-0179-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142138PMC
September 2014

A Comparative Study of Transmembrane Diffusion and Permeation of Ibuprofen across Synthetic Membranes Using Franz Diffusion Cells.

Pharmaceutics 2010 May 18;2(2):209-223. Epub 2010 May 18.

Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, Taylor Street, Glasgow G4 0NR, UK.

Synthetic membranes used in Franz diffusion cells for topical formulation quality assessment should provide least resistance to drug diffusion. In this study, the diffusion rates of ibuprofen across thirteen membranes were determined using Franz diffusion cells. Correlation of the membrane thickness, pore size and MWCO with drug fluxes was also made. The drug diffusion results showed that the porous membranes were categorized into high-flux (8-18 mg/cm²/h) and low-flux (0.1-3 mg/cm²/h) membranes. The drug fluxes did not show strong correlations (r² < 0.99) with membrane parameters. Synthetic membranes can give variable drug fluxes, thus investigators should be careful in choosing membrane for formulation quality assessment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics2020209DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3986717PMC
May 2010

Moisture-activated rheological structuring of nonaqueous poloxamine-poly(acrylic acid) systems designed as novel biomedical implants.

J Pharm Sci 2010 Apr;99(4):1838-54

School of Pharmacy, The Queen's University of Belfast, Medical Biology Centre, 97, Lisburn Road, Belfast BT9 7BL, Northern Ireland, UK.

This study reports the formulation/characterisation of novel polymeric platforms designed to behave as low-viscosity systems in the nonaqueous state, however, following uptake of aqueous fluids, exhibit rheological structuring and mucoadhesion. The rheological/mechanical and mucoadhesive properties of platforms containing poly(acrylic acid) (PAA, 1%, 3%, 5%, w/w) and poloxamines (Tetronic 904, 901, 704, 701, 304), both in the absence and presence of phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) are described. With the exception of Tetronic 904, all formulations exhibited Newtonian flow in the nonaqueous state, whereas, all aqueous formulations displayed pseudoplastic flow. The consistency and viscoelastic properties were dependent on the concentrations of PAA and PBS and Tetronic grade. PBS significantly increased the consistency, viscoelasticity and mucoadhesion, reaching a maximum at a defined concentration of PBS that was dependent on PAA concentration and Tetronic grade. Formulations containing Tetronic 904 exhibited greatest consistency and elasticity both prior to and after dilution with PBS. Increasing PAA concentration enhanced the mucoadhesive properties. Prolonged drug release of metronidazole was observed from formulations containing 10% (w/w) PBS, 3% and, particularly, 5% (w/w) PAA. It is suggested that the physicochemical properties of formulations containing 3% or 5% (w/w) PAA and Tetronic 904, would render them suitable platforms for administration to body cavities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jps.21956DOI Listing
April 2010

Physicochemical characterization of bioactive polyacrylic acid organogels as potential antimicrobial implants for the buccal cavity.

Biomacromolecules 2008 Feb 26;9(2):624-33. Epub 2008 Jan 26.

Medical Polymers Research Institute, School of Pharmacy, The Queen's University of Belfast, Medical Biology Centre, 97, Lisburn Road, Belfast, BT9 7BL, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom.

This study describes the formulation and physicochemical characterization of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) organogels, designed as bioactive implants for improved treatment of infectious diseases of the oral cavity. Organogels were formulated containing a range of concentrations of PAA (3-10% w/w) and metronidazole (2 or 5% w/w, representing a model antimicrobial agent) in different nonaqueous solvents, namely, glycerol (Gly), polyethylene glycol (PEG 400), or propylene glycol (PG). Characterization of the organogels was performed using flow rheometry, compressional analysis, oscillatory rheometry, in vitro mucoadhesion, moisture uptake, and drug release, methods that provide information pertaining to the nonclinical and clinical use of these systems. Increasing the concentration of PAA significantly increased the consistency, compressibility, storage modulus, loss modulus, dynamic viscosity, mucoadhesion, and the rate of drug release. These observations may be accredited to enhanced molecular polymer entanglement. In addition, the choice of solvent directly affected the physicochemical parameters of the organogels, with noticeable differences observed between the three solvents examined. These differences were accredited to the nature of the interaction of PAA with each solvent and, importantly, the density of the resultant physical cross-links. Good correlation was observed between the viscoelastic properties and drug release, with the exception of glycerol-based formulations containing 5 and 10% w/w PAA. This disparity was due to excessive swelling during the dissolution analysis. Ideally, formulations should exhibit controlled drug release, high viscoelasticity, and mucoadhesion, but should flow under minimal stresses. Based on these criteria, PEG 400-based organogels composed of 5% or 10% w/w PAA exhibited suitable physicochemical properties and are suggested to be a potentially interesting strategy for use as bioactive implants designed for use in the oral cavity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/bm700597eDOI Listing
February 2008

An examination of the rheological and mucoadhesive properties of poly(acrylic acid) organogels designed as platforms for local drug delivery to the oral cavity.

J Pharm Sci 2007 Oct;96(10):2632-46

School of Pharmacy, Medical Biology Centre, The Queen's University of Belfast, 97, Lisburn Road, Belfast BT9 7BL, Northern Ireland, UK.

This study examined the rheological/mucoadhesive properties of poly(acrylic acid) PAA organogels as platforms for drug delivery to the oral cavity. Organogels were prepared using PAA (3%, 5%, 10% w/w) dissolved in ethylene glycol (EG), propylene glycol (PG), 1,3-propylene glycol (1,3-PG), 1,5-propanediol (1,5-PD), polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400), or glycerol. All organogels exhibited pseudoplastic flow. The increase in storage (G') and loss (G'') moduli of organogels as a function of frequency was minimal, G'' was greater than G'' (at all frequencies), and the loss tangent <1, indicative of gel behavior. Organogels prepared using EG, PG, and 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) exhibited similar flow/viscoelastic properties. Enhanced rheological structuring was associated with organogels prepared using glycerol (in particular) and PEG 400 due to their interaction with adjacent carboxylic acid groups on each chain and on adjacent chains. All organogels (with the exception of 1,5-PD) exhibited greater network structure than aqueous PAA gels. Organogel mucoadhesion increased with polymer concentration. Greatest mucoadhesion was associated with glycerol-based formulations, whereas aqueous PAA gels exhibited the lowest mucoadhesion. The enhanced network structure and the excellent mucoadhesive properties of these organogels, both of which may be engineered through choice of polymer concentration/solvent type, may be clinically useful for the delivery of drugs to the oral cavity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jps.20771DOI Listing
October 2007

Discovery of SB-705498: a potent, selective and orally bioavailable TRPV1 antagonist suitable for clinical development.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2006 Jun 31;16(12):3287-91. Epub 2006 Mar 31.

Neurology and GI CEDD, New Frontiers Science Park, GlaxoSmithKline, Third Avenue, Harlow, Essex CM19 5AW, UK.

Small molecule antagonists of the vanilloid receptor TRPV1 (also known as VR1) are disclosed. Pyrrolidinyl ureas such as 8 and 15 (SB-705498) emerged as lead compounds following optimisation of the previously described urea SB-452533. Pharmacological studies using electrophysiological and FLIPR-Ca2+-based assays showed that compounds such as 8 and 15 were potent antagonists versus the multiple chemical and physical modes of TRPV1 activation (namely capsaicin, acid and noxious heat). Furthermore, 15 possessed suitable developability properties to enable progression of this compound into in vivo studies and subsequently clinical development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2006.03.030DOI Listing
June 2006
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