Publications by authors named "Dolphine Oda"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Microsecretory Adenocarcinoma of Salivary Glands: An Expanded Series of 24 Cases.

Head Neck Pathol 2021 May 12. Epub 2021 May 12.

Department of Pathology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.

Microsecretory adenocarcinoma (MSA) is a recently described salivary gland tumor with a characteristic histologic and immunophenotypic profile and recurrent MEF2C-SS18 fusions. Because only six cases of MSA have been published, its complete clinicopathologic spectrum is unclear, and its biologic behavior has not been documented. Here, we present an updated and expanded experience of 24 MSA cases. All cases of MSA were obtained from the authors' files. Immunohistochemistry for S100, SOX10, p63, p40, SMA, calponin, and mammaglobin was performed. Molecular analysis was performed by targeted RNA sequencing, SS18 break apart fluorescence in situ hybridization, and/or reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for MEF2C-SS18 fusion. Clinical follow-up was obtained from medical records. A total of 24 MSA cases were collected, from 13 women and 11 men, ranging from 17 to 83 years (mean 49.5 years). The vast majority (23 of 24) arose in the oral cavity, with the palate (n = 14) and buccal mucosa (n = 6) as the most frequent subsites. Tumors showed consistent histologic features including: (1) microcystic tubules, (2) flattened intercalated duct-like cells, (3) monotonous oval hyperchromatic nuclei, (4) abundant basophilic luminal secretions, (5) fibromyxoid stroma, and (6) circumscribed borders with subtle infiltration. The tumors were very consistently positive for S100 (24 of 24), p63 (24 of 24), and SOX10 (14 of 14) and negative for p40 (0 of 21), calponin (0 of 12) and mammaglobin (0 of 16), while SMA (4 of 20) was variable. MEF2C-SS18 fusion was demonstrated in 21 of 24 cases; in the remaining 3 cases with insufficient RNA, SS18 break apart FISH was positive. Treatment information was available in 17 cases, all of which were managed with surgery only. In 14 cases with follow-up (1-216 months, mean 30), no cases recurred or metastasized. MSA is a distinct salivary gland neoplasm with remarkably consistent clinical, histologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features that generally behaves in an indolent manner following surgery alone. These observations solidify MSA as a unique, low-grade salivary gland carcinoma that warrants inclusion in the next version of the WHO classification of head and neck tumors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12105-021-01331-7DOI Listing
May 2021

A case series of intraosseous hemangioma of the jaws: Various presentations of a rare entity.

J Clin Exp Dent 2017 Nov 1;9(11):e1366-e1370. Epub 2017 Nov 1.

BDS MSc, Professor, 1959 NE Pacific St, Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Washington School of Dentistry, Seattle, Washington 98195-7133, USA.

Background: Hemangiomas of the soft tissue are common in the head and neck area, especially in the tongue and in children under ten years of age. Intraosseous hemangiomas of the mandible and maxilla (IHM), on the other hand, are exceedingly rare and are not well characterized. This study presents six IHM cases focusing on the clinical, radiographic, and histologic characteristics.

Material And Methods: Six cases of IHM were retrieved from the archives of the Biopsy Services at the University of Washington. Clinical, radiologic, and histologic findings are described.

Results: A total of six cases of IHM were reviewed. The patient age range was 16 to 65; the group comprised three females and three males. All six cases presented as swellings, two caused tooth resorption, and one was associated with pain and numbness. Three of the six IHM were present in the body of the mandible, two in the area of the extracted right mandibular third molar, and one in the anterior maxilla between the right canine and lateral incisor. Radiographically, five were radiolucent and one was radiopaque. Of the five radiolucent, two were unilocular and three multilocular. The one radiopaque case was exophytic, simulating a large osteoma. Histologic features ranged from cavernous to a mix of venous and arterial types. Follow-up is available for all six cases ranging between one to seven years; only one case recurred within the first year post-surgery.

Conclusions: IHM are exceedingly rare; IHM do not present in a consistent manner both clinically and radiographically. It is therefore important to recognize the wide spectrum of IHM's clinical, radiographic, and histological presentations. Hemangioma, Vascular Malformation, mandible, maxilla.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4317/jced.54285DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5741852PMC
November 2017

Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: Case series of 14 with wide range of clinical presentation.

J Clin Exp Dent 2017 Nov 1;9(11):e1315-e1321. Epub 2017 Nov 1.

Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Washington School of Dentistry, Seattle, Washington.

Background: To present 14 cases of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), highlighting their clinical, radiographic, and histologic characteristics.

Material And Methods: Fourteen cases of AOT were retrieved from the archives of the Oral Pathology Biopsy Service (OPBS). Clinical, radiologic, and histologic findings are described.

Results: Fourteen AOT cases were reviewed, of which 12 were intraosseous and two were peripheral (gingiva). The cases came from eight females and six males with an age range of 11-30. Of the 12 intraosseous cases, nine were follicular (associated with impacted teeth), while three were extra-follicular (present between teeth). Six of the 12 cases were in the maxilla, and the other six were in the mandible. The two peripheral cases presented as nodules on the buccal gingiva of the anterior maxillary teeth. Radiographically, all 12 follicular and extra-follicular cases were unilocular radiolucencies; of those, only one had specks of radiopacity. Histologically, all specimens were similar in morphology, demonstrating a varied degree of duct-like structures, epithelial spheres, spindle-shaped epithelial cells, calcifications, and a thick capsule. The two peripheral cases had no capsule.

Conclusions: AOT usually affects patients under 20 years of age, with a female to male ratio close to 2:1. Presentation in the anterior maxilla is almost twice as common as in the anterior mandible. Radiographically, AOT presents as a unilocular radiolucency more commonly associated with impacted teeth, simulating a dentigerous cyst. We present 14 new cases of AOT (nine follicular, three extra-follicular, and two peripheral) with discussions of their clinical, radiographic, and histological features. Adenomatoid, odontogenic, tumor.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4317/jced.54216DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5741845PMC
November 2017

Oral manifestations as the first presenting sign of Crohn's disease in a pediatric patient.

J Clin Exp Dent 2017 Jul 1;9(7):e934-e938. Epub 2017 Jul 1.

BDS, MSc, University of Washington School of Dentistry, Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Seattle, WA.

Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Although the GI tract is the primary site of involvement, many patients, particularly in pediatric cases, first present with non-intestinal manifestations, including oral lesions. Oral manifestations of CD in children occur in around 50-80% of cases, and about 30% of CD cases in children occur first in the mouth. Recognizing such oral lesions in the pediatric population, and requesting a biopsy, may expedite the diagnosis of CD. We describe a 15 year old male who presented with oral findings of multiple aphthous ulcers and plaques of pink papules of the buccal vestibule. We highlight the initial pathology findings, including non-caseating granulomas, sialadenitis, and a notable plasmacytosis, from biopsy of the left retromolar pad area, which triggered further testing for CD. We provide discussion of how CD was eventually diagnosed and treated and highlight the significance of the pathological findings in this case as they relate to the pathogenesis of CD. Crohn's disease, Inflammatory bowel disease, Oral manifestations, Pediatric, Granulomatous inflammation, Monotypic plasma cells.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4317/jced.53914DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5549595PMC
July 2017

Glandular odontogenic cyst associated with ameloblastoma: Case report and review of the literature.

J Clin Exp Dent 2017 Jun 1;9(6):e832-e836. Epub 2017 Jun 1.

BDS, MSc. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Washington School of Dentistry, Seattle WA USA.

Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) associated with ameloblastoma is an exceedingly rare histologic presentation with no known clinical significance or treatment applications. Four cases have been reported, three in the mandible and one in the maxilla. The age range is 14-65 and with male predilection. All four presented with swellings and two with pain. We add one more case to the literature of a 58-year old male presenting with an expansile multilocular radiolucency between teeth #19-23. The ameloblastomatous changes in this case are consistent with those of a unicystic ameloblastoma-mural subtype. Although the histologic changes are those of a unicystic ameloblastoma, the clinical and radiographic findings are not. This case therefore presents a clinical challenge with regards to treatment planning for recurrence and prognosis. We conclude that treatment for GOC therefore be based on individual clinical presentation. Glandular odontogenic cyst, GOC, ameloblastoma, unicystic ameloblastoma, mural unicystic ameloblastoma.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4317/jced.53775DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5474343PMC
June 2017

Head and Neck Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical and Pathologic Characterization of Seven Cases.

Head Neck Pathol 2017 Sep 28;11(3):321-326. Epub 2016 Nov 28.

Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Washington School of Dentistry, Seattle, WA, 98195-7133, USA.

Head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma occurs frequently in children and adolescents, and has been well studied in that population. In contrast, it is rare in adults and is not as well characterized clinically and pathologically. Seven cases of adult rhabdomyosarcoma occurring in head and neck were retrieved from the archives of Department of Pathology and Division of Oral Pathology at University of Washington. Radiologic findings and clinical history, as well as pathologic findings from hematoxylin and eosin slides and immunohistochemistry for myogenic markers were reviewed. A total of seven cases of rhabdomyosarcoma (two embryonal, three alveolar and two pleomorphic subtype) were reviewed. Patient ages ranged from 18 to 57 years (median 21 years). Classic and unique histologic features for each subtype, including post-treatment morphologic changes, were identified. Clinical follow-up information was available for 4 patients. 3 of 4 patients experienced recurrence, including two with distant metastasis. One patient died of disease progression 41 months after presentation. Head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma in adults can manifest both classic and unique histologic features for each subtype. In addition, recurrence and distant metastasis were observed, suggesting aggressive clinical behavior regardless of subtype.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12105-016-0771-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5550390PMC
September 2017

Focal Benign Disorders of the Pediatric Mandible With Radiologic-Histopathologic Correlation: Mandibular Development and Lucent Lesions.

AJR Am J Roentgenol 2017 Jan 20;208(1):180-192. Epub 2016 Oct 20.

1 Department of Radiology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA.

Objective: Lucent lesions of the pediatric mandible may present variably. Cysts, neoplasms, and developmental and inflammatory conditions have a host of possible causes. There is also substantial overlap in the imaging appearance of cysts and that of benign but locally aggressive tumors that need to undergo resection.

Conclusion: The purpose of this article is to present common and uncommon lucent lesions of the mandible in children, with an emphasis on benign abnormalities. Discussions of imaging and histopathologic features are provided.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2214/AJR.16.16587DOI Listing
January 2017

Diagnosis and Clinical Management of Human Papilloma Virus-Related Gingival Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Patient With Leukemia: A Case Report.

Clin Adv Periodontics 2016 Feb 1;6(1):50-56. Epub 2016 Feb 1.

Department of Periodontics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Introduction: Close clinical inspection for intraoral lesions in patients with leukemia that develop chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is critical. Additionally, neoplasias developing in bone marrow transplant patients after treatment for leukemia represent a significant obstacle for long-term patient survival, necessitating lifetime follow-up by health care providers. This case report describes the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of gingival squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in a patient with leukemia who was treated previously with a stem cell transplant and referred for routine periodontal care.

Case Presentation: A 53-year-old male was referred to the Department of Periodontics for an assessment of tooth #10 with 2+ mobility and associated cross-bite occlusion. The patient was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia at age 39 years, received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and later developed cGVHD followed by human papilloma virus (HPV) infections. During the periodontal evaluation, a large, non-painful, exophytic, alveolar gingival mass was identified and later diagnosed as SCC. It is unusual that oral SCC presents as an exophytic, gingival swelling. The patient received comprehensive periodontal management in coordination with his otolaryngology team before and during the diagnosis of SCC secondary to cGVHD and HPV infection.

Conclusions: Patients with a history of HSCT treatment for leukemia and subsequent cGVHD are at a high risk of developing second primary oral malignancies, including SCC. Exposure to oncogenic HPV infection may compound this risk. Therefore, it is important for dentists to be aware of special treatment concerns and to frequently screen these patients to achieve early diagnosis and treatment of these neoplasms.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1902/cap.2015.150038DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5868985PMC
February 2016

Primary lesion of multiple myeloma presenting as gingival swelling.

J Oral Maxillofac Pathol 2012 Sep;16(3):425-7

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

It is rare that multiple myeloma (MM) occurs as a primary lesion in the jaws; we report such a case in an elderly patient involving the gingiva of the left posterior mandible. Multiple myeloma is a monoclonal malignant neoplasm of plasma cell origin which occurs in the bone marrow and may result in extensive destruction of skeletal structures. If the jaws are involved, it usually indicates an advanced stage of the disease.Thi s makes our case very unique due to the fact no other osteolytic lesions were identified at the time of the diagnosis of multiple myeloma. We report a rare case of multiple myeloma which was diagnosed from an intraoral gingival lesion on the lower left mandible.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0973-029X.102508DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3519222PMC
September 2012

AAOMP case challenge: pain in the right posterior mandible.

J Contemp Dent Pract 2008 Jan 1;9(1):122-7. Epub 2008 Jan 1.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2008

Soft-tissue lesions in children.

Authors:
Dolphine Oda

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2005 Nov;17(4):383-402

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Washington, Box 357134, B-204 Health Sciences Building, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.

This article reviews some of the benign and malignant oral soft-tissue swellings that occur in children, with an emphasis on their clinical presentation, etiology, histopathology, and treatment. These lesions include single and multiple nodules, reactive lesions, and benign and malignant neoplasms. Diseases discussed include reactive gingival swelling, generalized gingival fibromatosis, melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy, fibromas, vascular lesions, salivary gland lesions, and infantile rhabdomyomas. Also covered are lesions that may present in multiples, such as neuromas, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2b, neurofibromatosis, and human papilloma virus-related benign epithelial lesions. Benign but locally aggressive and malignant neoplasms are discussed, such as aggressive fibromatosis, myofibromatosis, fibrosarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2005.08.005DOI Listing
November 2005

AAOMP case challenge: A smooth-surfaced nodule on the ventral tongue.

J Contemp Dent Pract 2007 Nov 1;8(7):114-8. Epub 2007 Nov 1.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2007

More well-differentiated squamous cell carcinomas in individuals younger than 40 years old.

Authors:
Dolphine Oda

J Evid Based Dent Pract 2005 Dec;5(4):217-8

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jebdp.2005.09.013DOI Listing
December 2005

Artemisinin: an alternative treatment for oral squamous cell carcinoma.

Anticancer Res 2004 Jul-Aug;24(4):2153-60

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, University of Washington, Box 357134, Seattle, WA 98195-7134, USA.

Artemisinin (AR) is a widely used antimalarial drug. Recently, additional uses for AR as an anticancer drug were discovered. Using TUNEL, immunohistochemistry (IHS) markers and flow cytometry techniques, we evaluated the effect of AR and 5-FU on HPV 16 immortalized and transformed human gingival epithelial (IHGK) cells. The results of TUNEL showed that AR-treated IHGK cells consisted of 82% positive cells, while 5-FU-treated cells consisted of 18% positive cells. The IHS markers demonstrated positive staining with Bax p53, CD40 and CD40L in AR-treated cells and negative staining with Bcl-2. 5-FU-treated cells demonstrated a profile similar to AR but with less intensity. Cell cycle by flow cytometry results showed that only 5-FU-treated cells demonstrated a significant S-phase rate increase to 45%. In conclusion, our results indicate that AR is cytotoxic to transformed oral epithelial cells through apoptosis, while 5-FU is cytotoxic primarily through cell toxicity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2004

Mutations of the cell cycle arrest gene p21WAF1, but not the metastasis-inducing gene S100A4, are frequent in oral squamous cell carcinomas from Sudanese toombak dippers and non-snuff-dippers from the Sudan, Scandinavia, USA and UK.

Anticancer Res 2002 May-Jun;22(3):1445-51

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Bergen, Norway.

PCR and direct DNA sequencing methods were used to analyse the prevalence of mutations in exon 2 of the p21waf1 gene in 14 oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) and 8 non-malignant oral mucosal lesions from Sudanese toombak dippers. For comparison, OSCCs (14 from the Sudan, 16 from Norway, 11 from Sweden, 21 from the USA and 14 from the UK) and non-malignant oral mucosal lesions (3 from the Sudan) from non-snuff-dippers were included. The prevalence of mutations in exons 2 & 3 of the S100A4 gene were analysed in the 14 OSCCs from toombak-dippers and in 25 cases of OSCCs from the control non-snuff-dippers. Of the 14 OSCCs investigated from toombak-dippers, mutations in the p21waf1 exon 2 were found in 43% (6 out of 14), compared to 14% (2 out of 14), 22% (6 out of 27) and 14% (5 out of 35) found in those from non-snuff-dippers from the Sudan, Scandinavia and the USA/UK, respectively. OSCCs from toombak-dippers showed 13 different mutations distributed as 10 (77%) transitions and 3 (23%) transversions. OSCCs from non-snuff-dippers from the Sudan, Scandinavia, the USA and the UK showed 33 different mutations distributed as 14 (42%) transitions and 19 (58%) transversions. In the OSCCs examined, cases with mutations in the p21waf1 also had p53 gene mutations. Only exon 2 of the S100A4 gene was found mutated in 3 cases of OSCCs (one from a toombak-dipper and two from the non-snuff-dippers). The toombak-dipper OSCC had 4 mutations (one transition, 3 transversions), compared to the OSCCs from non-snuff-dippers which showed 3 mutations each (one transition, 2 transversions). All these 3 cases were negative for mutations in the p21waf1 and p53 genes. No mutations of p21waf1 or S100A4 were found in the non-malignant oral mucosal lesions from the snuff-dippers/non-dippers. These findings suggest that; (i) p21waf1, together with p53, is a target gene of oral carcinogenesis in OSCCs from toombak-dippers, with the tobacco specific nitrosamines present in toombak possibly acting as principal carcinogens in these OSCCs; (ii) findings of p21waf1 exon 2 mutations in the OSCCs unrelated to snuff use further demonstrate that this gene may play an important role during the pathogenesis of OSCCs caused by smoked tobacco use; (iii) mutations in the S100A4 gene are rare in OSCCs, but appears to be complementary to p21waf1 and p53 mutations. Since molecular analysis of OSCCs can provide clues to endogenous or environmental factors contributing to the high risk of OSCCs, further analysis of the role of the p21waf1 gene mutations as a biomarker of malignant transformation, which is linked to the p53 gene, is necessary, especially in habitual users of toombak from the Sudan.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2002

Detection of Cytochrome P450 mRNA in Tissue Sections and Cell Lines Using Enzyme-Labeled Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization.

In Vitro Toxicol 1997 ;10(3):295-308

Department of Environmental Health, University of Washington, 4225 Roosevelt Way NE, #100, Seattle, WA 98105-6099.

Cytochrome P450s (P450s) constitute a superfamily of enzymes that metabolize a broad array of xenobiotics. The ability to measure basal and induced levels of P450 mRNA in specific cells and tissues should provide valuable insight regarding the functional role and heterogeneous expression of these enzymes in chemically related diseases. Methodologies for detecting cell-specific mRNA expression patterns typically rely on radiolabeled probes and photographic emulsions, often coupled with long exposure times. These studies were conducted to evaluate an enzyme-labeled fluorescence (ELF) in situ hybridization technique to detect specific P450 mRNA. Deparaffinized, formalin-fixed tissue sections and cells from culture were incubated for 12 hours with 5'-biotinylated 20-base DNA oligomer probes (20-mer). Specific hybridization was detected using a streptavidin alkaline-phosphatase conjugate followed by incubation with the ELF substrate, yielding a bright, yellow-green fluorescent signal. In this study, utility of the technique was demonstrated using cultured rat hepatorna cells, and tissue sections from rat liver and human oral epithelium. Ribonuclease A pretreatment of the sample, omission of the probe, competition with a nonbiotinylated oligomer, and the use of only partially homologous probes served as negative controls to demonstrate the specificity of the hybridization signal. Our results clearly demonstrated the ability of ELF in situ hybridization to discriminately detect cell-specific P450 mRNA in tissue sections and cultured cells. This technique eliminates the use of radioactivity and enables in situ detection of mRNAs with relative ease, efficiency, specificity, and high sensitivity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3360469PMC
January 1997