Publications by authors named "Do Thi Thanh Toan"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Diagnostic Value of Fluorescence Methods, Visual Inspection and Photographic Visual Examination in Initial Caries Lesion: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Dent J (Basel) 2021 Mar 6;9(3). Epub 2021 Mar 6.

School of Odonto Stomatology, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi 100000, Vietnam.

This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to investigate the efficacy of fluorescence-based methods, visual inspections, and photographic visual examinations in initial caries detection. A literature search was undertaken in the PubMed and Cochrane databases. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed, and eligible articles published from 1 January 2009 to 30 October 2019 were included if they met the following criteria: they (1) assessed the accuracy of methods of detecting initial tooth caries lesions on occlusal, proximal, or smooth surfaces in both primary and permanent teeth (in clinical); (2) used a reference standard; (3) reported data regarding the sample size, prevalence of initial tooth caries, and accuracy of the methods. Data collection and extraction, quality assessment, and data analysis were conducted according to Cochrane standards Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2. Statistical analyses were performed using Review Manager 5.3 and STATA 14.0. A total of 12 eligible articles were included in the meta-analysis. The results showed that the sensitivity and specificity of fluorescence-based methods were 80% and 80%, respectively; visual inspection was measured at 80% and 75%, respectively; photographic visual examination was measured at 67% and 79%, respectively. We found that the visual method and the fluorescence method were reliable for laboratory use to detect early-stage caries with equivalent accuracy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/dj9030030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8000741PMC
March 2021

Exercise and Quality of Life in Women with Menopausal Symptoms: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 09 26;17(19). Epub 2020 Sep 26.

Department of Integrative Bioscience & Biotechnology, Sejong University, 209 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 05006, Korea.

Menopausal symptoms are associated with deterioration in physical, mental, and sexual health, lowering women's quality of life (QoL). Our study objective is to examine the effect of exercise on QoL in women with menopausal symptoms. After initially identifying 1306 studies published on PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Cochrane Library before June 2020, two researchers independently selected nine randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which any type of exercise was compared with no active treatment. We assessed the risk of bias in the included studies using the Cochrane risk-of-bias 2.0 tool for RCTs and computed the converged standardized mean difference with a 95% confidence interval. We found evidences for the positive effects of exercise on physical and psychological QoL scores in women with menopausal symptoms. However, there was no evidence for the effects of exercise on general, social, and menopause-specific QoL scores. The most common interventions for women with menopausal and urinary symptoms were yoga and pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), respectively. In our meta-analyses, while yoga significantly improved physical QoL, its effects on general, psychological, sexual, and vasomotor symptoms QoL scores as well as the effect of PFMT on general QoL were not significant. Our findings suggest that well-designed studies are needed to confirm the effect of exercise on QoL in women with menopausal symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197049DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7579592PMC
September 2020

Knowledge of Cervical Cancer and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines among Child-Bearing Aged Women in Hanoi, Vietnam.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2020 Jul 1;21(7):1951-1957. Epub 2020 Jul 1.

Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do, 10408, Republic of Korea.

Objectives: The study sought to examine knowledge of cervical cancer and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines among child-bearing aged women in Hanoi, Vietnam.

Methods: In 2016, 807 women aged 18 to 49 years were recruited from one urban area and one rural area in 2016 and were examined through face-to-face paper-based interviews. Pearson's chi-square test and an independent t-test were utilized to compare awareness of cervical cancer and HPV vaccination among women according residential status.

Results: Overall, 83.8% and 71.3% women had heard about cervical cancer and HPV vaccination, respectively. Mean knowledge scores for cervical cancer and HPV vaccination were 4.60±1.43 out of 7 and 1.53±1.35 out of 5, respectively. Women living in an urban area were more likely to be aware of cervical cancer and to be more knowledgeable of HPV vaccination than women in a rural area.

Conclusions: Despite strong awareness, we found knowledge on cervical cancer and HPV vaccination to be alarmingly insufficient among Vietnamese women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.31557/APJCP.2020.21.7.1951DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7573401PMC
July 2020

Factors associated with the duration of hospitalisation among COVID-19 patients in Vietnam: A survival analysis.

Epidemiol Infect 2020 06 10;148:e114. Epub 2020 Jun 10.

Institute of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Background: The median duration of hospital stays due to COVID-19 has been reported in several studies on China as 10-13 days. Global studies have indicated that the length of hospitalisation depends on different factors, such as the time elapsed from exposure to symptom onset, and from symptom onset to hospital admission, as well as specificities of the country under study. The goal of this paper is to identify factors associated with the median duration of hospital stays of COVID-19 patients during the second COVID-19 wave that hit Vietnam from 5 March to 8 April 2020.

Method: We used retrospective data on 133 hospitalised patients with COVID-19 recorded over at least two weeks during the study period. The Cox proportional-hazards regression model was applied to determine the potential risk factors associated with length of hospital stay.

Results: There were 65 (48.9%) females, 98 (73.7%) patients 48 years old or younger, 15 (11.3%) persons with comorbidities, 21 (16.0%) severely ill patients and 5 (3.8%) individuals with life-threatening conditions. Eighty-two (61.7%) patients were discharged after testing negative for the SARS-CoV-2 virus, 51 were still in the hospital at the end of the study period and none died. The median duration of stay in a hospital was 21 (IQR: 16-34) days. The multivariable Cox regression model showed that age, residence and sources of contamination were significantly associated with longer duration of hospitalisation.

Conclusion: A close look at how long COVID-19 patients stayed in the hospital could provide an overview of their treatment process in Vietnam, and support the country's National Steering Committee on COVID-19 Prevention and Control in the efficient allocation of resources over the next stages of the COVID-19 prevention period.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268820001259DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7306545PMC
June 2020

Heatwaves and dengue outbreaks in Hanoi, Vietnam: New evidence on early warning.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2020 01 21;14(1):e0007997. Epub 2020 Jan 21.

School of Public Health and Social Work, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.

Background: Many studies have shown associations between rising temperatures, El Niño events and dengue incidence, but the effect of sustained periods of extreme high temperatures (i.e., heatwaves) on dengue outbreaks has not yet been investigated. This study aimed to compare the short-term temperature-dengue associations during different dengue outbreak periods, estimate the dengue cases attributable to temperature, and ascertain if there was an association between heatwaves and dengue outbreaks in Hanoi, Vietnam.

Methodology/principal Findings: Dengue outbreaks were assigned to one of three categories (small, medium and large) based on the 50th, 75th, and 90th percentiles of distribution of weekly dengue cases during 2008-2016. Using a generalised linear regression model with a negative binomial link that controlled for temporal trends, temperature variation, rainfall and population size over time, we examined and compared associations between weekly average temperature and weekly dengue incidence for different outbreak categories. The same model using weeks with or without heatwaves as binary variables was applied to examine the potential effects of extreme heatwaves, defined as seven or more days with temperatures above the 95th percentile of daily temperature distribution during the study period. This study included 55,801 dengue cases, with an average of 119 (range: 0 to 1454) cases per week. The exposure-response relationship between temperature and dengue risk was non-linear and differed with dengue category. After considering the delayed effects of temperature (one week lag), we estimated that 4.6%, 11.6%, and 21.9% of incident cases during small, medium, and large outbreaks were attributable to temperature. We found evidence of an association between heatwaves and dengue outbreaks, with longer delayed effects on large outbreaks (around 14 weeks later) than small and medium outbreaks (4 to 9 weeks later). Compared with non-heatwave years, dengue outbreaks (i.e., small, moderate and large outbreaks combined) in heatwave years had higher weekly number of dengue cases (p<0.05). Findings were robust under different sensitivity analyses.

Conclusions: The short-term association between temperature and dengue risk varied by the level of outbreaks and temperature seems more likely affect large outbreaks. Moreover, heatwaves may delay the timing and increase the magnitude of dengue outbreaks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007997DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6994101PMC
January 2020

Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice Regarding Breast Cancer Early Detection Among Women in a Mountainous Area in Northern Vietnam.

Cancer Control 2019 Jan-Dec;26(1):1073274819863777

1 Institute of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women all over the world, also in Vietnam. In recent years, the incidence of breast cancer has been increasing in Vietnam, and most cases are diagnosed at late stages, making treatment more difficult. More and better early detection could help more women to survive. The aim of this study was to identify the current knowledge, attitude and practice about early detection of breast cancer as well as potential predictors of breast cancer screening among women aged 20 to 49 year in a mountainous commune in Thanh Hoa Province, Vietnam, in a largely ethnic Muong population. Women aged 20 to 49 years were selected by systematic random sampling to participate in a cross sectional study in October 2017. They were interviewed with a closed questionnaire about their knowledge of breast cancer, its risk factors, and warning signs. A checklist for performance of breast self-examination was also applied. Three hundred six women agreed to participate in the study. More than half had a low level of knowledge, and were weak in attitude and practice about breast self-examination, clinical breast examination, breast ultrasound, and mamography. Among women who had practiced at least 1 screening method, 17.0% mentioned clinical breast examination, and only 13.8% reported practicing breast self-examination. Factors associated with practice included knowledge about breast cancer early detection (BCED), ethnicity, income, the BCED information approach, and the BCED screening programs approach. The finding of a very low proportion of women in the mountainous setting with good awareness and practice on early detection of breast cancer is important evidence to inform the BCED intervention program developers about where and how to target which information, especially to reach more ethnic minority women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1073274819863777DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6651667PMC
January 2020

Estimates of meteorological variability in association with dengue cases in a coastal city in northern Vietnam: an ecological study.

Glob Health Action 2014 8;7:23119. Epub 2014 Dec 8.

Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, Institute for Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Background: Dengue fever (DF) is a vector-borne disease that is sensitive to weather and climate variability. To date, however, this relationship in coastal northern Vietnam has not been well documented.

Objectives: This paper aims to examine the associations between meteorological variables and dengue incidence in Haiphong, Vietnam, over the period 2008-2012.

Methods: Monthly data on dengue incidence from all commune health stations and hospitals of Haiphong (with a total population of ~1.8 million) were obtained in accordance with the WHO's recommendations over a 5-year period (2008-2012). Temperature, rainfall, and humidity were recorded as monthly averages by local meteorological stations. The association between ecologic weather variables and dengue cases was assessed using a Poisson regression model. The estimation of regression parameters was based on the method of maximum likelihood using the R program package.

Results: From 2008 through 2012, 507 cases of dengue were reported. The risk of dengue was increased by sevenfold during the September-December period compared with other months over the period 2008-2012. DF cases in Haiphong were correlated with rainfall and humidity. In the multivariable Poisson regression model, an increased risk of dengue was independently associated with months with a higher amount of rainfall (RR=1.06; 95% CI 1.00-1.13 per 50 mm increase) and higher humidity (RR=1.05; 95% CI 1.02-1.08 per 1% increase).

Conclusion: These data suggest that rainfall and relative humidity could be used as ecological indicators of dengue risk in Haiphong. Intensified surveillance and disease control during periods with high rainfall and humidity are recommended. This study may provide baseline information for identifying potential long-term effects and adaptation needs of global climate change on dengue in the coming decades.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4265646PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/gha.v7.23119DOI Listing
April 2015

Seasonality in mortality and its relationship to temperature among the older population in Hanoi, Vietnam.

Glob Health Action 2014 8;7:23115. Epub 2014 Dec 8.

Department of Nutrition and Food Safety, Institute for Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Background: Several studies have established a relationship between temperature and mortality. In particular, older populations have been shown to be vulnerable to temperature effects. However, little information exists on the temperature-mortality relationship in Vietnam.

Objectives: This article aims to examine the monthly temperature-mortality relationship among older people in Hanoi, Vietnam, over the period between 2005 and 2010, and estimate seasonal patterns in mortality.

Methods: We employed Generalized Additive Models, including smooth functions, to model the temperature-mortality relationships. A quasi-Poisson distribution was used to model overdispersion of death counts. Temporal trends, seasonality, and population size were adjusted for while estimating changes in monthly mortality over the study period. A cold month was defined as a month with a mean temperature below 19°C.

Results: This study found that the high peak of mortality coincided with low temperatures in the month of February 2008, during which the mean temperature was the lowest in the whole study period. There was a significant relationship between mean monthly temperature and mortality among the older people (p<0.01). Overall, there was a significant decrease in the number of deaths in the year 2009 during the study period. There was a 21% increase in the number of deaths during the cold season compared to the warm season. The increase in mortality during the cold period was higher among females compared to males (female: IRR [incidence relative risk] =1.23; male: IRR=1.18).

Conclusions: Cold temperatures substantially increased mortality among the older population in Hanoi, Vietnam, and there were gender differences. Necessary preventive measures are required to mitigate temperature effects with greater attention to vulnerable groups.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4265647PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/gha.v7.23115DOI Listing
April 2015

Perceptions of climate change and its impact on human health: an integrated quantitative and qualitative approach.

Glob Health Action 2014 8;7:23025. Epub 2014 Dec 8.

The Medical Committee Netherlands - Vietnam, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Background: The World Health Organization emphasized that climate change is a significant and emerging threat to public health, especially in lower income populations and tropical/subtropical countries. However, people in Asia and Africa were the least likely to perceive global warming as a threat. In Vietnam, little research has been conducted concerning the perceptions of effects of climate change on human health.

Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions on climate change and its impact on human health among people in Hanoi.

Design: We applied a combined quantitative and qualitative approach to study perceptions on climate change among people in Hanoi. A total of 1,444 people were recruited, including 754 people living in non-slum areas and 690 people living in slum areas of Hanoi. A structured questionnaire was used to collect quantitative data on their perceptions. In a parallel qualitative study, two focus group discussions and 12 in-depth interviews (IDs) were carried out involving 24 people from both slum and non-slum areas.

Results: The majority of the respondents in the study had heard about climate change and its impact on human health (79.3 and 70.1% in non-slum and slum areas, respectively). About one third of the respondents reported that members of their family had experienced illness in the recent summer and winter compared to the same seasons 5 years ago. The most common symptoms reported during hot weather were headaches, fatigue, and dizziness; hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases were also reported. During cold weather, people reported experiencing cough, fever, and influenza, as well as pneumonia and emerging infectious diseases such as dengue and Japanese encephalitis.

Conclusions: The observed high level of awareness on the links between climate change and human health may help to increase the success of the National Prevention Program on Climate Change. Moreover, understanding the concerns of the people may help policy makers to develop and implement effective and sustainable adaptation measures for Hanoi City as well as for Vietnam as a whole.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4265644PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/gha.v7.23025DOI Listing
April 2015

Climatic-driven seasonality of emerging dengue fever in Hanoi, Vietnam.

BMC Public Health 2014 Oct 16;14:1078. Epub 2014 Oct 16.

Biostatistics and Medical Informatics Department, Institute of Training for Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Background: Dengue fever (DF) has been emerging in Hanoi over the last decade. Both DF epidemiology and climate in Hanoi are strongly seasonal. This study aims at characterizing the seasonality of DF in Hanoi and its links to climatic variables as DF incidence increases from year to year.

Methods: Clinical suspected cases of DF from the 14 central districts of Hanoi were obtained from the Ministry of Health over a 8-year period (2002-2009). Wavelet decompositions were used to characterize the main periodic cycles of DF and climatic variables as well as the mean phase angles of these cycles. Cross-wavelet spectra between DF and each climatic variables were also computed. DF reproductive ratio was calculated from Soper's formula and smoothed to highlight both its long-term trend and seasonality.

Results: Temperature, rainfall, and vapor pressure show strong seasonality. DF and relative humidity show both strong seasonality and a sub-annual periodicity. DF reproductive ratio is increasing through time and displays two clear peaks per year, reflecting the sub-annual periodicity of DF incidence. Temperature, rainfall and vapor pressure lead DF incidence by a lag of 8-10 weeks, constant through time. Relative humidity leads DF by a constant lag of 18 weeks for the annual cycle and a lag decreasing from 14 to 5 weeks for the sub-annual cycle.

Conclusion: Results are interpreted in terms of mosquito population dynamics and immunological interactions between the different dengue serotypes in the human compartment. Given its important population size, its strong seasonality and its dengue emergence, Hanoi offers an ideal natural experiment to test hypotheses on dengue serotypes interactions, knowledge of prime importance for vaccine development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-14-1078DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4287517PMC
October 2014

Hot spot detection and spatio-temporal dispersion of dengue fever in Hanoi, Vietnam.

Glob Health Action 2013 Jan 24;6:18632. Epub 2013 Jan 24.

Institute of Training for Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Introduction: Dengue fever (DF) in Vietnam remains a serious emerging arboviral disease, which generates significant concerns among international health authorities. Incidence rates of DF have increased significantly during the last few years in many provinces and cities, especially Hanoi. The purpose of this study was to detect DF hot spots and identify the disease dynamics dispersion of DF over the period between 2004 and 2009 in Hanoi, Vietnam.

Methods: Daily data on DF cases and population data for each postcode area of Hanoi between January 1998 and December 2009 were obtained from the Hanoi Center for Preventive Health and the General Statistic Office of Vietnam. Moran's I statistic was used to assess the spatial autocorrelation of reported DF. Spatial scan statistics and logistic regression were used to identify space-time clusters and dispersion of DF.

Results: The study revealed a clear trend of geographic expansion of DF transmission in Hanoi through the study periods (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.02-1.34). The spatial scan statistics showed that 6/14 (42.9%) districts in Hanoi had significant cluster patterns, which lasted 29 days and were limited to a radius of 1,000 m. The study also demonstrated that most DF cases occurred between June and November, during which the rainfall and temperatures are highest.

Conclusions: There is evidence for the existence of statistically significant clusters of DF in Hanoi, and that the geographical distribution of DF has expanded over recent years. This finding provides a foundation for further investigation into the social and environmental factors responsible for changing disease patterns, and provides data to inform program planning for DF control.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3556563PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/gha.v6i0.18632DOI Listing
January 2013