Publications by authors named "Dmitri A Voronov"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A novel eukaryotic Na+ methionine selective symporter is essential for mosquito development.

Insect Biochem Mol Biol 2013 Aug 6;43(8):755-67. Epub 2013 Jun 6.

Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Rosalind Franklin University, Chicago Medical School, North Chicago, IL 60064, USA.

AeNAT5 (NCBI, ABZ81822), an orphan member of the insect-specific Nutrient Amino acid Transporter subfamily of SoLute Carrier family 6 (NAT-SLC6) and the first representative of a novel eukaryotic methionine-selective transport system (M), was cloned from cDNA of the vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti. It has orphan orthologs throughout several mosquito genomes, but not in Drosophila or outside Diptera. It shows the highest apparent affinity to L-Met (K(0.5) = 0.021 mM) and its metabolites Homocysteine and Cysteine (K(0.5) = 0.89 and 2.16 mM), but weakly interact with other substrates. It has a Na(+) - coupled mechanism (K(0.5) Na(+) ∼ 46 mM) with 1AA:1Na(+) stoichiometry that maintains ∼60% activity in Cl(-) - free media. In situ hybridization showed accumof AeNAT5 transcript in the absorptive and secretory epithelia, as well as in specific peripheral neurons and the central ganglia of mosquito larvae. The labeling pattern is distinct from that of the previously characterized AeNAT1. RNAi of AeNAT5 increases larval mortality during ecdysis and dramatically suppresses adult emergence. Our results showed that in addition to previously characterized broad spectra and aromatic amino acid selective transport systems, the mosquito NAT-SLC6 subfamily evolved a unique mechanism for selective absorption of sulfur-containing substrates. We demonstrated specific patterns of alimentary and neuronal transcription of AeNAT5 in mosquito larvae that is collateral with the indispensable function of this transporter in mosquito development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ibmb.2013.05.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3746589PMC
August 2013

AaCAT1 of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti: a novel histidine-specific amino acid transporter from the SLC7 family.

J Biol Chem 2011 Mar 24;286(12):10803-13. Epub 2011 Jan 24.

Department of Biology and Institute of Applied Biosciences, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003-8001, USA.

Insect yolk protein precursor gene expression is regulated by nutritional and endocrine signals. A surge of amino acids in the hemolymph of blood-fed female mosquitoes activates a nutrient signaling system in the fat bodies, which subsequently derepresses yolk protein precursor genes and makes them responsive to activation by steroid hormones. Orphan transporters of the SLC7 family were identified as essential upstream components of the nutrient signaling system in the fat body of fruit flies and the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. However, the transport function of these proteins was unknown. We report expression and functional characterization of AaCAT1, cloned from the fat body of A. aegypti. Expression of AaCAT1 transcript and protein undergoes dynamic changes during postembryonic development of the mosquito. Transcript expression was especially high in the third and fourth larval stages; however, the AaCAT1 protein was detected only in pupa and adult stages. Functional expression and analysis of AaCAT1 in Xenopus oocytes revealed that it acts as a sodium-independent cationic amino acid transporter, with unique selectivity to L-histidine at neutral pH (K(0.5)(L-His) = 0.34 ± 0.07 mM, pH 7.2). Acidification to pH 6.2 dramatically increases AaCAT1-specific His(+)-induced current. RNAi-mediated silencing of AaCAT1 reduces egg yield of subsequent ovipositions. Our data show that AaCAT1 has notable differences in its transport mechanism when compared with related mammalian cationic amino acid transporters. It may execute histidine-specific transport and signaling in mosquito tissues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M110.179739DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3060531PMC
March 2011