Publications by authors named "Diogo Costa Leandro de Oliveira"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Systemic paracoccidioidomycosis involving breast.

Breast J 2018 09 22;24(5):831-832. Epub 2018 Jul 22.

Department of Radiology, "Antonio Pedro" University Hospital, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbj.13078DOI Listing
September 2018

Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: an Update.

Arq Bras Cardiol 2016 Aug 10;107(2):163-72. Epub 2016 Jun 10.

Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cardiovascular disease and represents the main cause of sudden death in young patients. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and cardiac computed tomography (CCT) are noninvasive imaging methods with high sensitivity and specificity, useful for the establishment of diagnosis and prognosis of HCM, and for the screening of patients with subclinical phenotypes. The improvement of image analysis by CMR and CCT offers the potential to promote interventions aiming at stopping the natural course of the disease. This study aims to describe the role of RCM and CCT in the diagnosis and prognosis of HCM, and how these methods can be used in the management of these patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5935/abc.20160081DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5074069PMC
August 2016

Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in ischemic cardiomyopathy: an update.

Radiol Bras 2016 Jan-Feb;49(1):26-34

Associate Professor and Vice-Chief of the Department of Radiology, School of Medicine - Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niterói, RJ, Brazil.

Ischemic cardiomyopathy is one of the major health problems worldwide, representing a significant part of mortality in the general population nowadays. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) and cardiac computed tomography (CCT) are noninvasive imaging methods that serve as useful tools in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and may also help in screening individuals with risk factors for developing this illness. Technological developments of CMRI and CCT have contributed to the rise of several clinical indications of these imaging methods complementarily to other investigation methods, particularly in cases where they are inconclusive. In terms of accuracy, CMRI and CCT are similar to the other imaging methods, with few absolute contraindications and minimal risks of adverse side-effects. This fact strengthens these methods as powerful and safe tools in the management of patients. The present study is aimed at describing the role played by CMRI and CCT in the diagnosis of ischemic cardiomyopathies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0100-3984.2014.0055DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4770394PMC
March 2016

Evaluation of knowledge of the term "nephrology" in a population sample.

J Bras Nefrol 2013 Apr-Jun;35(2):107-11

Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, RJ, Brazil.

Introduction: The consolidation of nephrology as a medical specialty is relatively new and its denomination does not intuitively reflects its true scope.

Objective: To assess the degree of knowledge from a population sample regarding the term "nephrology".

Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional study in Niterói, RJ, with adult passerby individuals answering to the question "Do you know what nephrology is?". The variables recorded included: gender, age, skin-color, residence, income, educational level and kidney-disease history in the family. p values < 0.05 were considered significant.

Results: Of the 564 individuals asked, 504 were willing to answer. Of those who refused, 64% were males, 58% caucasians--from whom 85% were aged > 30 years. The mean age among participants was 39 (22-56) years, 49% were males and 56% caucasians. Twenty-eight percent of the interviewees knew the term "nephrology". Their knowledge came from school (39%) and family (30%). Those who knew about the term "nephrology" were older (42 ± 17 vs. 39 ± 17 years, p < 0.05), had higher income (R$ 4,522 vs. R$ 2,934, p < 0.05) and higher education (27% vs. 12% with complete higher education, p < 0.001). They were predominantly caucasians (64% vs. 53%, p = 0.001), and had a higher rate of renal disease in the family (55% vs. 36%, p < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, associations were maintained for age (OR 1.02; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.03, p = 0.004); higher education (OR 10.60, 95% CI, 4.20 to 26.86, p < 0.001) and kidney disease in the family (OR 2.2, 95% CI, 1.40 to 3.41, p < 0.001).

Conclusions: Only 28% knew the term "nephrology", illustrating the specialty's low penetration. We must strive to popularize this field of medicine aiming at better educating the population concerning the prevention and care of kidney diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5935/0101-2800.20130018DOI Listing
May 2014
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