Publications by authors named "Dinamene Oliveira"

6 Publications

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Evaluating vertical transmission of sexually transmitted infections to newborns.

J Infect Dev Ctries 2021 10 31;15(10):1547-1550. Epub 2021 Oct 31.

Global Health and Tropical Medicine, Institute of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, NOVA University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.

Introduction: Sexually transmitted infections are among the most frequent infections affecting pregnant women. We assessed the transmission of hepatitis B virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and Treponema pallidum to newborns from infected parturients.

Methodology: An observational, cross-sectional, analytical facility-based survey was conducted among 57 newborns in Irene Neto Maternity, Lubango city, Huíla province, Angola. Hepatitis B virus DNA molecular identification was done through nested PCR. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proviral DNA detection was carried out by two successive nested PCRs. Real-time PCR was performed to examine the presence of T. pallidum DNA. Amplicons from PCR positive samples were sequenced for identity search and genotype assignment.

Results: Hepatitis B virus DNA genotype E was detected in 3/41 (7.3%) newborns from HBsAg (hepatitis B surface antigen) positive mothers. To analyse the association between mothers HBeAg (hepatitis B e antigen) positivity and hepatitis B virus vertical transmission to newborns, a Fisher's exact test was performed, showing a highly significant association (p = 0.006). Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 provirus or T. pallidum DNA was not detected in any newborn.

Conclusions: To prevent hepatitis B virus vertical transmission in Angola it is important to promote universal antenatal screening, expanding hepatitis B virus markers (viral load and/or HBeAg), risk-based infected mothers' antiviral therapy and newborn passive immunoprophylaxis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3855/jidc.12731DOI Listing
October 2021

A systematic review of the maternal and neonatal complications in hepatitis B infection.

J Clin Virol 2020 12 29;133:104680. Epub 2020 Oct 29.

Global Health and Tropical Medicine, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal.

The association between hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and maternal, obstetric and newborn outcomes remains controversial, as previous studies have reported conflicting and inconsistent results on the matter. The aim was to investigate whether HBV infection increases the risk of maternal, obstetric and newborn complications. We conducted a systematic literature review, according to PRISMA statement guidelines. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they were observational cohort, case-control or cross-sectional studies, comparing maternal, obstetric or newborn complications in HBV-infected and uninfected pregnant women. PubMed was searched for published literature in English, with no date restrictions, using combinations of keywords. The titles and abstracts were independently screened for eligibility by three authors. Two authors assessed the quality of each included study and no meta-analysis was performed. We retrieved 275 records and included 15 papers. The methodological and statistical heterogeneity as well as a great variation on the types of maternal, obstetric and newborn complications studied did not allow quantitative analysis of results and conclusions about the level of evidence. Seven studies are of good quality, which makes their results more reliable. Three of them revealed that maternal HBV infection increased the risk of miscarriage, preterm birth, pregnancy-induced hypertension, fetal distress and macrosomia. These three studies were performed in China and the one with the largest number of participants only included women from rural areas. Larger, more robust, well-designed prospective cohort studies are needed. These must include adjusted estimates for confounding factors, such as other possible complications determinants, like the antenatal care quality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2020.104680DOI Listing
December 2020

Seropositivity rate and sociodemographic factors associated to HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis among parturients from Irene Neto Maternity of Lubango city, Angola.

Sex Transm Infect 2020 12 18;96(8):587-589. Epub 2020 May 18.

Global Health and Tropical Medicine, Universidade Nova de Lisboa Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Lisboa, Portugal.

Objectives: To characterise infections by HIV, hepatitis B (HBV) and C virus (HCV) in parturients admitted to Irene Neto Maternity, Lubango city, Huíla province, Angola, namely its seropositivity rate and its association with sociodemographic factors.

Methods: An observational, cross-sectional and analytical facility-based survey was conducted among 500 parturients at Irene Neto Maternity, from October 2016 to September 2017. Women in labour were screened for antibodies against HIV-1/2, and HCV. Antigen detection was used to diagnose HBV infections. Sociodemographic data were also collected. The seropositivity rate and respective CIs were estimated at a level of 95%. Multivariable logistic regression models were performed to explore the association between the studied infections and sociodemographic factors.

Results: In 11.8% of the parturients (95% CI 9.3 to 14.9), at least one infection was detected. HBV infection was the most common (8.6%), followed by HIV infection (3.0%) and syphilis (1.0%). Coinfection with HBV and HIV was observed in two parturients (0.4%) and HBV, HIV and were all detected in one parturient (0.2%). No HCV infection was detected. For each additional year of formal education, pregnant women had a 10.0% lower chance of being infected with HBV (adjusted OR=0.900, 95% CI 0.816 to 0.992).

Conclusions: This study is one of the few reports contributing for the knowledge of some sexually transmitted infections epidemiology in Angola. The seropositivity rate of the studied infections is of concern, especially the high endemicity of HBV. There is a need for a stronger commitment and further research to design cost-effective public health and clinical interventions to improve the situation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/sextrans-2019-054249DOI Listing
December 2020

HIV, HBV and syphilis screening in antenatal care in Lubango, Angola.

Sex Transm Infect 2020 12 31;96(8):621-622. Epub 2020 Mar 31.

Global Health and Tropical Medicine, Universidade Nova de Lisboa Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Lisboa, Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/sextrans-2019-054407DOI Listing
December 2020

Infection by Intestinal Parasites, Stunting and Anemia in School-Aged Children from Southern Angola.

PLoS One 2015 15;10(9):e0137327. Epub 2015 Sep 15.

Global Health and Tropical Medicine, Unidade de Clínica Tropical, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal.

Introduction: Intestinal parasites are responsible for morbidity in children worldwide, especially in low income countries. In the present study we determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites and explore its association with anemia and stunting in school-aged children.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from September to October 2010 enrolling 328 children attending the primary school in Lubango, the second largest city after the capital Luanda. Stool samples were collected for parasite detection through microscopy and molecular identification of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar. Stunting was assessed using the z-scores of height for age and hemoglobin concentration was determined using a portable hemoglobin analyzing system.

Results: The global prevalence of pathogenic intestinal parasites was 44.2%, the most common being Ascaris lumbricoides (22.0%), Giardia lamblia (20.1%) and Hymenolepis nana (8.8%). Molecular detection revealed that 13.1% of the children carried E. dispar and 0.3% were infected with E. histolytica. The prevalence of stunting (mild to severe) was 41.5%. Stunting was more frequent in older children (p = 0.006, OR = 1.886), while anemia was more frequent in younger children (p = 0.005, OR = 2.210). The prevalence of anemia was 21.6%, and we found a significant association with infection by H. nana (p = 0.031, OR = 2.449).

Conclusions: This is one of the few published studies reporting intestinal parasites infection, nutritional status and anemia in children from Angola. Furthermore, the present work highlights the importance of regular intestinal parasites screening in children.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0137327PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4570803PMC
May 2016

Giardia duodenalis and soil-transmitted helminths infections in children in São Tomé and Príncipe: do we think Giardia when addressing parasite control?

J Trop Pediatr 2015 Apr 20;61(2):106-12. Epub 2015 Jan 20.

Unidade de Clínica Tropical e Centro de Malária e Doenças Tropicais-LA, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 1349-008 Lisboa, Portugal.

Giardia duodenalis prevalence is commonly as high as soil-transmitted helminths (STH), nevertheless is not considered for large-scale chemotherapy through mass drug administration (MDA) due to its short incubation period and frequent reinfections, its control being associated to improving access to water and sanitation. A study enrolling 444 children attending preschools was conducted in May 2011 during a deworming campaign. Faecal samples were obtained and analysed through microscopy of wet mounting and after Kato-Katz and formol-ether concentration techniques. The majority of children were infected with at least one pathogenic parasite (86.7%, 385 of 444). Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura (56.3%, 250 of 444 and 52.5%, 233 of 444, respectively) were the most frequent parasites followed by G. duodenalis infecting 41.7% (185 of 444) of the children. The present work aimed at obtaining updated information concerning intestinal parasite infections in children attending preschools in São Tomé and Príncipe and to contribute for the adequate management of the enteric infections.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tropej/fmu078DOI Listing
April 2015
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