Publications by authors named "Dina Bassiouny"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

CTNNB1 Mutations and Aberrant β-Catenin Expression in Ovarian Endometrioid Carcinoma: Correlation With Patient Outcome.

Am J Surg Pathol 2021 01;45(1):68-76

Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto.

CTNNB1 mutations and aberrant β-catenin expression have adverse prognosis in endometrial endometrioid carcinoma, and recent evidence suggests a prognostic role of β-catenin in ovarian endometrioid carcinoma. Thus, we aimed to determine the prognostic value of the CTNNB1 mutational status, and its correlation with β-catenin expression, in a well-annotated cohort of 51 ovarian endometrioid carcinomas. We performed immunohistochemistry for β-catenin and developed an 11-gene next-generation sequencing panel that included whole exome sequencing of CTNNB1 and TP53. Results were correlated with clinicopathologic variables including disease-free and disease-specific survival. Tumor recurrence was documented in 14 patients (27%), and cancer-related death in 8 patients (16%). CTNNB1 mutations were found in 22 cases (43%), and nuclear β-catenin in 26 cases (51%). CTNNB1 mutation highly correlated with nuclear β-catenin (P<0.05). Mutated CTNNB1 status was statistically associated with better disease-free survival (P=0.04, log-rank test) and approached significance for better disease-specific survival (P=0.07). It also correlated with earlier International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage (P<0.05). Nuclear β-catenin, TP53 mutations, age, ProMisE group, surface involvement, tumor grade and stage also correlated with disease-free survival. There was no association between membranous β-catenin expression and disease-free or disease-specific survival. CTNNB1 mutations and nuclear β-catenin expression are associated with better progression-free survival in patients with OEC. This relationship may be in part due to a trend of CTNNB1-mutated tumors to present at early stage. β-catenin immunohistochemistry may serve as a prognostic biomarker and a surrogate for CTNN1B mutations in the evaluation of patients with ovarian endometrioid neoplasia, particularly those in reproductive-age or found incidentally without upfront staging surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PAS.0000000000001553DOI Listing
January 2021

Establishment of an antimicrobial stewardship strategy on the surgical NICU at Cairo University specialized pediatric hospital.

J Pediatr Surg 2020 Sep 28;55(9):1959-1964. Epub 2019 Dec 28.

Department of Clinical and Chemical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. Electronic address:

Purpose: Antimicrobial resistance is a major concern that we are facing nowadays. This is due to antibiotic misuse and bacteria developing resistance to the commonly used antibiotics. This may lead to increased mortality and consumption of country resources. Implementation of an antimicrobial stewardship program [ASP] can limit the use of unnecessary antibiotics and subsequently decrease the infection rates with better patient outcome. We aimed to control antibiotic misuse, reduce infection rate, decrease drug costs, and reduce length of hospital stay in the ICU.

Methods: We conducted a prospective study on the surgical neonatal ICU [SNICU] over a period of 6 months divided into pre-implementation phase, followed by an ASP phase, in which we applied the antibiotic guidelines approved by the ASP committee. Data were collected in the two phases and analyzed for demographics, compliance with guidelines, prescribed antibiotics, lab investigations, surgical site infection [SSI], length of stay and patient outcome.

Results: Compliance to the guidelines was encountered in 86% and SSI rate decreased to 20%. Days of Therapy (DOT) per 1000 patient days showed a significant decrease in Ampicillin Sulbactam by 296 (p = 0.024), Imipenem by 220.34 (p = 0.024) and Vancomycin by 287.34 (p = 0.048). Drug cost showed a 1185.97 EGP decrease in the ASP period compared to the pre-implementation period (p = 0.714). Average LOS decreased in the ASP period by a mean difference of 2.5 (p = 0.027).

Conclusion: ASP implementation can control antibiotic misuse, decrease the medical care expenses and improve patient outcome.

Type Of Study: Clinical research paper.

Level Of Evidence: Level one.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2019.12.005DOI Listing
September 2020

Histological grading of ovarian mucinous carcinoma - an outcome-based analysis of traditional and novel systems.

Histopathology 2020 Jul 29;77(1):26-34. Epub 2020 May 29.

Department of Laboratory Medicine, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Aims: Grading of primary ovarian mucinous carcinoma (OMC) is inconsistent among practices. The International Collaboration on Cancer Reporting recommends grading OMC using the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) system for endometrial endometrioid carcinoma, when needed. The growth pattern (expansile versus infiltrative), a known prognostic variable in OMC, is not considered in any grading system. We herein analysed the prognostic value of various grading methods in a well-annotated cohort of OMC.

Methods And Results: Institutional OMCs underwent review and grading by the Silverberg and FIGO schemes and a novel system, growth-based grading (GBG), defined as G1 (expansile growth or infiltrative invasion in ≤10%) and G2 (infiltrative growth >10% of tumour). Of 46 OMCs included, 80% were FIGO stage I, 11% stage II and 9% stage III. On follow-up (mean = 52 months, range = 1-190), five patients (11%) had adverse events (three recurrences and four deaths). On univariate analysis, stage (P = 0.01, Cox proportional analysis), Silverberg grade (P = 0.01), GBG grade (P = 0.001) and percentage of infiltrative growth (P < 0.001), but not FIGO grade, correlated with disease-free survival. Log-rank analysis showed increased survival in patients with Silverberg grade 1 versus 2 (P < 0.001) and those with GBG G1 versus G2 (P < 0.001). None of the parameters evaluated was significant on multivariate analysis (restricted due to the low number of adverse events).

Conclusions: Silverberg and the new GBG system appear to be prognostically significant in OMC. Pattern-based grading allows for a binary stratification into low- and high-grade categories, which may be more appropriate for patient risk stratification. Despite current practices and recommendations to utilise FIGO grading in OMC, our study shows no prognostic significance of this system and we advise against its use.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/his.14039DOI Listing
July 2020

p53, Mismatch Repair Protein, and POLE Abnormalities in Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma: An Outcome-based Clinicopathologic Analysis.

Am J Surg Pathol 2019 12;43(12):1591-1599

Departments of Laboratory Medicine and Molecular Diagnostics.

The PROMISE diagnostic algorithm, which uses p53, mismatch repair (MMR) protein immunohistochemistry, and DNA polymerase ε (POLE) exonuclease domain mutation testing, is a reliable surrogate of the molecular group in endometrial carcinoma. Its prognostic value has been validated in endometrial carcinoma and ovarian endometrioid carcinoma. Moreover, a similar prognostic grouping has been recently documented in endometrial clear cell carcinoma. Thus, we aimed to explore the role of these markers in ovarian clear cell carcinoma, another endometriosis-associated malignancy. A total of 90 cases were identified and confirmed after secondary review. Immunohistochemistry for p53, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 was performed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. POLE mutational analysis was performed in 47 cases. Results were correlated with clinicopathologic variables including disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival, and disease-specific survival (DSS). Endometriosis was found in 67 (74%) cases. Six (7%) tumors were p53 abnormal, 82 (91%) were p53 normal, and 2 (2%) tumors had MMR deficiency (1 MSH6 loss and 1 MSH2/6 loss; both were p53 normal). Several POLE variants of unknown significance were detected, but no pathogenic mutations. The mean follow-up period was 43 months (median: 34, range: 1 to 189). Abnormal p53 status was associated with advanced Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, lymph node metastases, DFS and DSS (P<0.05, Fisher exact test). In univariate analysis, abnormal p53 and positive lymph node status had worse DFS, whereas bilaterality, surface involvement, and advanced stage were associated with worse DFS, overall survival and DSS (P<0.05, Cox regression). On multivariate analysis, only stage retained statistical association with survival. Using a molecular-based approach designed for endometrial carcinoma, most ovarian clear cell carcinomas fall into the copy-number-low molecular subgroup. However, a small but important subset has an abnormal p53 expression (copy-number-high group). This subset is associated with adverse features including extrapelvic disease, nodal metastases, and recurrence similar to endometrial and ovarian endometrioid cancer. Thus, testing for this marker has potential prognostic significance. The role of other markers in the PROMISE algorithm remains to be elucidated, as we found a low frequency of MMR abnormalities and no pathogenic POLE mutations in our series.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PAS.0000000000001328DOI Listing
December 2019

FIGO Versus Silverberg Grading Systems in Ovarian Endometrioid Carcinoma: A Comparative Prognostic Analysis.

Am J Surg Pathol 2019 02;43(2):161-167

Departments of Laboratory Medicine.

The International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology (FIGO) grading system for endometrial carcinoma is currently applied to ovarian endometrioid carcinoma (OEC) in many practices. However, previous reports claim superior prognostication by using the Silverberg grading system for ovarian carcinoma. Thus, a thorough comparison between FIGO and Silverberg in OEC is still warranted. A total of 72 OECs diagnosed at our institution were independently graded using both systems. Grade (G) following Silverberg was based on combined scores for architecture, nuclear atypia, and mitotic activity. FIGO grading was based on the % of nonsquamous solid component; severe atypia warranted upgrade to the architectural FIGO grade (G1 to G2 or G2 to G3). Case grouping by grade was correlated with disease-free (DFS), disease-specific (DSS), and overall (OS) survival. Eleven (15.3%) OECs were bilateral, 26 (36.1%) had ovarian surface involvement, and 12 (16.7%) had lymphovascular space invasion. Forty-seven OECs were stage I (65%), 16 (22%) stage II, and 9 (13%) stage III. Median follow-up period was 62 months (range: 1 to 179 mo). Median DFS was 60.5 months (1 to 179 mo); median OS was 61 months (1 to 179 mo). Sixteen (22%) OECs recurred and 9 (13%) patiets died of disease. In univariate analysis, both FIGO and Silverberg correlated significantly with DFS, DSS, and OS (all with P<0.05). However, when compared in multivariate analysis, only Silverberg retained statistical correlation with survival (P<0.05). G1+G2 OEC by Silverberg had significantly better DFS, DSS, and OS compared with G3; such separation was not seen with FIGO. Survival was similar in Silverberg G1 and G2 tumors even 5 years after diagnosis, whereas FIGO G2 tumors had survival approaching G1 in the first 5 years, but declined after the 5-year mark approaching G3 tumors. Tumor laterality, lymphovascular space invasion, and stage also correlated with outcome. Stage showed prognostication superior to all other variables in multivariate analysis. As currently defined, the Silverberg grading system is a better predictor of survival than FIGO. Such differences may be explained by the G2 OEC groups, with G2 Silverberg clustering with G1 tumors, and having a more favorable behavior compared with G2 FIGO. Thus, Silverberg may be preferable in order to stratify patients in low and high-risk categories for prognosis and disease management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PAS.0000000000001160DOI Listing
February 2019

Endometriosis-associated Ovarian Cancer is a Subset With a More Favorable Outcome and Distinct Clinical-pathologic Characteristics.

Int J Gynecol Pathol 2019 Sep;38(5):435-442

Department of Pathology (D.B., M.A.E.-B., T.M.G.) Surgical Oncology Department, Oncology Centre (N.S.), Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre (D.B., N.I., V.D., G.H., M.C., F.-I.L., E.S., H.F.C., M.N., N.L., S.N.-M.) Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto (D.B., N.I., V.D., G.H., M.C., F.-I.L., E.S., S.N.-M.), Toronto, Ontario, Canada Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (M.A.K.).

There is a controversy about whether endometriosis-associated ovarian cancer (EAOC) might represent a different entity from the corresponding ovarian cancer occurring de novo, in the absence of endometriosis. This study investigated the clinical-pathologic characteristics and outcome of EAOC compared with other ovarian carcinomas that are not associated with endometriosis (non-EAOC) in a large cohort. Seven hundred two patients meeting the inclusion criteria were further subclassified as group I when patients had ovarian carcinoma associated with or arising within endometriosis (EAOC) and group II when patients had non-EAOC. Age, gross features, histologic type, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, and disease-free survival (DFS) were compared between the groups. One hundred sixty-eight (23.9%) patients had EAOC, whereas 534 (76.1%) patients had non-EAOC. EAOCs were mostly endometrioid and clear cell type. Patients with EAOC were younger, present early, and had a lower rate of recurrence when compared with patients with non-EAOC, P<0.001. Patients with EAOC had longer DFS time, 51.9 mo (95% confidence interval, 44.9-58.8) versus 30.5 mo (95% confidence interval, 27.7-33.3) in non-EAOC patients. The 5 yr Kaplan-Meier estimate of DFS rate was 70% in 166 patients of group I and was 39.3% in 532 patients of group II, P<0.001. On multivariate analysis, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics staging, histologic type, and treatment were the only significant factors affecting the hazards of recurrence. Patients with tumors associated with endometriosis are usually, younger, present early, have lower rate of recurrence, longer DFS, and their tumors are of lower grade and are more likely endometrioid or clear cell carcinoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PGP.0000000000000533DOI Listing
September 2019

Comprehensive Clinicopathologic and Updated Immunohistochemical Characterization of Primary Ovarian Mucinous Carcinoma.

Int J Surg Pathol 2018 Jun 16;26(4):306-317. Epub 2018 Jan 16.

1 Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

The distinction of primary mucinous ovarian carcinoma (PMOC) from other primaries or secondaries is essential for selecting therapeutic options and prognostication. We aimed to characterize the immunohistochemical profile of 36 PMOCs using an extended immunohistochemical panel, with clinicopathologic features and outcome. PAX8 was negative in 30 (83.3%), and SATB2 was negative in 32/35. HNF1B, AMACR, and napsin-A were detected in 33 (91.7%), 35 (97.2%), and 0 (0%), respectively. MMR proteins and ARID1A were retained in 100%; PTEN was lost in 4 (11.1%). P53 was aberrant in 10 (27.8%); none overexpressed p16. HER2 was positive in 6/35 (17.1%). Most PMOCs had a favorable outcome. However, recurrence is usually fatal. The typical tumor profile was CK7+, CK20+/-, CDX2+/-, PAX8-, ER-, PgR-, and SATB2-. HER2 positivity suggests a possible target for therapy in advanced disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1066896917752861DOI Listing
June 2018

Molecular-based classification algorithm for endometrial carcinoma categorizes ovarian endometrioid carcinoma into prognostically significant groups.

Mod Pathol 2017 12 4;30(12):1748-1759. Epub 2017 Aug 4.

Department of Anatomic Pathology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada.

The Cancer Genome Atlas classification divides endometrial carcinoma in biologically distinct groups, and testing for p53, mismatch repair proteins (MMR), and polymerase ɛ (POLE) exonuclease domain mutations has been shown to predict the molecular subgroup and clinical outcome. While abnormalities in these markers have been described in ovarian endometrioid carcinoma, their role in predicting its molecular profile and prognosis is still not fully explored. Patients with ovarian endometrioid carcinomas treated surgically in a 14-year period were selected. Only tumors with confirmation of endometrioid histology and negative WT1 and Napsin-A were included. POLE mutational analysis and immunohistochemistry for p53, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 was performed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Following the molecular classifier proposed for endometrial carcinoma (Br J Cancer2015;113:299-310), cases were classified as POLE mutated, MMR abnormal, p53 abnormal, and p53 wild type. Clinicopathologic information was recorded, including patient outcome. In all, 72 cases were included, distributed as follows: 7 (10%) POLE mutated; 6 (8%) MMR abnormal; 17 (24%) p53 abnormal; and 42 (58%) p53 wild type. The molecular classification correlated with disease-free survival in multivariate analysis (P=0.003), independently of tumor grade and stage. Correlation with overall survival approached statistical significance (P=0.051). POLE-mutated and MMR-abnormal tumors had excellent survival, whereas p53-abnormal tumors had significantly higher rates of recurrence and death. Ovarian endometroid carcinoma can be classified in clinically meaningful subgroups by testing for molecular surrogates, akin to endometrial cancer. MMR and POLE alterations seem to identify a subset of ovarian endometrioid carcinomas with excellent outcome; conversely, abnormal p53 carries a worse prognosis. In the era of personalized medicine, the use of these markers in the routine evaluation of ovarian endometrioid tumors should be considered.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/modpathol.2017.81DOI Listing
December 2017

Is adjuvant chemotherapy beneficial for surgical stage I ovarian clear cell carcinoma?

Gynecol Oncol 2017 10 29;147(1):54-60. Epub 2017 Jul 29.

Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Toronto, Canada. Electronic address:

Objective To assess the impact of adjuvant chemotherapy on survival in patients with surgical stage I ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC).

Methods: Data collection and analysis of surgical stage I OCCC patients treated at two tertiary cancer centers was performed. Descriptive statistics, univariate and multivariable analyses and Kaplan-Meier survival probability estimates were completed.

Results: Sixty stage I OCCC patients who underwent comprehensive surgical staging were identified. 29 patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and 31 did not. Median follow-up was 4.96 (0.4-16.4) years. The 5-year disease specific survival (DSS) was 84.2%: 95% for stage IA and 76% for stage IB+IC (p=0.16). There were 11 disease specific deaths: 7 in the no adjuvant chemotherapy group (NACG) and 4 in the adjuvant chemotherapy group (ACG). 5-year DSS was 84.2%: 74% in NACG and 93% in ACG, (p=0.13). Seventeen patients recurred: 11 in NACG and 6 in ACG (p=0.2). None of the 21 patients with stage I known negative cytology recurred. 5-year PFS was 74%: 58% in NACG and 86% in ACG (p=0.035). On univariate analysis, no-adjuvant chemotherapy and positive cytology were poor prognostic factors for PFS: HR=2.36, p=0.04 and HR=3.1, p=0.027, respectively. After adjusting for positive cytology, no-adjuvant chemotherapy was still found to significantly correlate with a worse PFS (HR=4, p=0.01).

Conclusion: Our data supports the use of adjuvant chemotherapy for surgical stage I OCCC. As no patients in our cohort with surgical stage I known negative cytology recurred, more research on the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in this group is warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2017.07.128DOI Listing
October 2017

Bacteremia Caused by from Egypt: Are There More? A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

Case Rep Infect Dis 2016 31;2016:6318064. Epub 2016 Oct 31.

Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.

is opportunistic Gram-positive cocci from the family Micrococcaceae. It is usually considered part of the normal flora that rarely is isolated from clinical specimens. Here, we report a case of bacteremia; to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report from Egypt.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6318064DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5107847PMC
October 2016

The effect of adjuvant radiation on survival in early stage clear cell ovarian carcinoma.

Gynecol Oncol 2016 Nov 9;143(2):258-263. Epub 2016 Sep 9.

Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address:

Objective: To assess the impact of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) on survival in patients with stage I and II ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC).

Methods: Data collection and analysis of stage I and II OCCC patients treated at two tertiary centers in Toronto, between 1995 and 2014, was performed. Descriptive statistics and Kaplan-Meier survival probability estimates were completed. The log-rank test was used to compare survival curves.

Results: 163 patients were eligible. 44 (27%) patients were treated with adjuvant RT: 37 of them received adjuvant chemotherapy (CT), and 7 had RT only. In the no-RT group, there were 119 patients: 83 patients received adjuvant CT and 36 had no adjuvant treatment. The 10year progression free survival (PFS) was 65% for patients treated with RT, and 59% no-RT patients. There were a total of 41 (25%) recurrences in the cohort: 12 (27.2%) patients in RT group and 29 (24.3%) in the no-RT group. On multivariable analysis, adjuvant RT was not significantly associated with an increased PFS (0.85 (0.44-1.63) p=0.63) or overall survival (OS) (0.84 (0.39-1.82) p=0.66). In the subset of 59 patients defined as high-risk: stage IC with positive cytology and/or surface involvement and stage II: RT was not found to be associated with a better PFS (HR 1.18 (95% CI: 0.55-2.54) or O S(HR 1.04 (95% CI: 0.40-2.69)).

Conclusion: Adjuvant RT was not found to be associated with a survival benefit in patients with stage I and II ovarian clear cell carcinoma or in a high risk subset of patients including stage IC cytology positive/surface involvement and stage II patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2016.09.006DOI Listing
November 2016
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