Publications by authors named "Dimitris Fotiou"

5 Publications

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Dietary Supplements on Controlling Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms and Relapses: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Perspectives.

Medicines (Basel) 2019 Sep 12;6(3). Epub 2019 Sep 12.

Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of the Aegean, Myrina, 81400 Lemnos, Greece.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) constitutes a chronic progressive demyelinating disease which negatively affects the central nervous system. MS symptoms detrimentally affect the quality of life, as well as the life expectancy of MS patients. In this aspect, the present study aims to critically summarize and evaluate the currently available clinical studies focusing on the potential beneficial effects of dietary supplements on controlling MS symptomatology and relapse. PubMed database was comprehensively searched, using relative keywords to identify clinical trials that investigated the beneficial effects of dietary supplementation against MS symptomatology and progression. 40 clinical trials were found, which were divided into categories. Nutritional status of MS patients, as well as supplementation have been suggested as potential factors affecting progression. Several substantial studies have documented a systematically high prevalence of vitamin A, B12 and D3 deficiency amongst MS patients. At present, clinical data have suggested that most of the dietary supplements under study may exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, improving depression symptomatology and quality of life overall. However, malnutrition risk in MS patients has not been adequately explored in order for more precise conclusions to be drawn. The supplements that may have a positive effect on MS are vitamins, fatty acids, antioxidants, phytochemicals and melatonin. Several dietary supplements may decrease inflammation and fatigue, also increasing also autoimmunity tolerance in MS patients, and thus improving quality of life and life expectancy. Currently, there is no effective clinical indication for applying dietary supplementation as complementary treatment against MS symptomatology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medicines6030095DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6789617PMC
September 2019

Cardiac autonomic function during intradialytic exercise training.

Postgrad Med 2019 Sep 15;131(7):539-545. Epub 2019 Sep 15.

Department of Physical Education & Sport Science, University of Thessaly , Trikala , Greece.

: Cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction is a common feature in patients receiving hemodialysis (HD) therapy, whilst is associated with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. The aim of this study is to investigate and compare the hemodynamic changes and responses of ANS function in HD patients using pupillometry and Heart Rate Variability (HRV) parameters. : Sixteen chronic kidney diseases (CKD) patients receiving HD (52.18 ± 17.7 years) underwent both pupillometric measurements using a portable handheld pupil-measuring device and standard HRV analysis pre HD, every hour and 30 min post-HD session under two different scenarios: at rest while the patient resting at HD bed and when the patient performed a single bout of intradialytic aerobic exercise lasting for 45 min during the second hour of the HD therapy. : No significant changes in ANS values were observed in neither of the pupillometric and the HRV values pre HD, for each hour and post-HD session. HRV parameters were significantly correlated with pupillometric parameters at pre HD and immediately after the single bout of intradialytic exercise. ANS activity did not differ during the conventional HD session and during the session included intradialytic exercise. Moreover, sympatho-vagal balance indices deriving from pupillometric assessment showed beneficial changes after the exercise event. : Pupillometry is a promising and robust technique with fewer artifacts compared to HRV especially in studies involving exercise sessions. Thus, pupillometry can be used as a complementary tool in the evaluation of cardiac autonomic dysfunction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00325481.2019.1663707DOI Listing
September 2019

Cognitive impairment as a central cholinergic deficit in patients with Myasthenia Gravis.

BBA Clin 2015 Jun 23;3:299-303. Epub 2015 Apr 23.

Neurology Clinic of AHEPA Hospital, Neuroscience Division, Medicine School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.

Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate with neurophysiological and neuropsychological methods such as pupillometry, cognitive test and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) the hypothesis of Central Nervous System (CNS) cholinergic involvement in patients with Myasthenia Gravis (MG).

Methods: Thirty-two patients (32) with MG and a mean age of 51.1 ± 17.2 volunteered to participate in this investigation, while thirty-three (33) healthy subjects with a mean age of 50.2 ± 14.8 served as controls. All subjects underwent pupillometric measurements and performed the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS) and HAM-D. The pupillometric indices studied were: 1) latency for the onset of constriction (T1), 2) maximum constriction velocity (VCmax) and 3) maximum constriction acceleration (ACmax).

Results: T1 was found significantly increased by 21.7% (p < 0.05) in MG patients as compared to healthy subjects. Conversely, VCmax and ACmax were significantly decreased in MG patients by 33.3% (p < 0.05) and 43.5% (p < 0.05) respectively, as opposed to healthy subjects. Additionally, MG patients showed significantly decreased score in WMS by 41.6% (p < 0.05) as compared to healthy controls. No significant difference was found for HAM-D between the two groups.

Conclusions: VCmax and ACmax are governed mainly by the action of the Parasympathetic Nervous System, through acetylcholine. The results of this study demonstrate that the CNS may be affected in MG and support the hypothesis that MG has central cholinergic effects manifested by cognitive dysfunction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbacli.2015.04.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4661582PMC
June 2015

Evaluation of autonomic imbalance in patients with heart failure: a preliminary study of pupillomotor function.

Cardiol J 2010 ;17(1):65-72

Laboratory of Clinical Neurophysiology, AHEPA Hospital, Medical Faculty, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.

Background: Purpose of this study was to examine pupil size changes and mobility in normal subjects and in heart failure (HF) patients.

Methods: Sixteen stable patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II or III heart failure and sixteen control subjects were studied. Pupillary reaction to light was recorded and nine parameters from this data were measured, reported and then compared in both groups of subjects.

Results: Patients with HF had abnormal pupillary function compared with normal subjects. Pupillary light reflex variables differed significantly between two groups (p < 0.05) except baseline radius (R1), minimum radius (R2) and time for maximum constriction (T3). A significant decrease in maximum constriction velocity (VCmax; p < 0.001) and maximum constriction acceleration (ACmax; p < 0.001) was observed in HF subjects. Furthermore, significantly higher values in percentage recovery-redilatation (%R; p < 0.001), percentage R2/R1 (%R2/R1; p < 0.05), latency (T1; p < 0.05) and time for maximum velocity (T2; p < 0.05) were found in the same group.

Conclusions: Of the parameters studied, R1 and %R are governed mainly by the action of the sympathetic nervous system, through norepinephrine. The rest are governed mainly by parasympathetic nervous system, through acetylcholine. The results of our study demonstrate generalized adrenergic activation and parasympathetic withdrawal, which are present in HF.
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April 2010

Pupil reaction to light in Alzheimer's disease: evaluation of pupil size changes and mobility.

Aging Clin Exp Res 2007 Oct;19(5):364-71

Laboratory of Clinical Neurophysiology, AHEPA Hospital, 54636 Thessaloniki, Greece.

Aims: The aim of the study is to assess pupil size changes and mobility evaluation as a diagnostic marker in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Material And Methods: Twenty-three control subjects and 23 patients with probable AD entered the study. The latter patients had been under observation for 2 years and had undergone all necessary examinations to verify their initial diagnosis. A full record of the pupil's reaction to light was registered. Ten parameters from these data were measured, reported and then compared in both group of subjects.

Results: Patients with probable AD had abnormal pupillary function compared with such function in healthy aging. All pupillary light reflex (PLR) variables differed significantly between the two groups (p<0.005) except baseline pupil diameter (D1) and minimum pupil diameter (D2). Maximum constriction acceleration (ACmax) was the best predictor in classifying a subject as normal or as AD with perfect classification ability (area under the curve =1, p<0.001). In addition, the correlation between the percentage recovery-redilatation (%D1) and ACmax was highly negative in the group of AD patients (r = -0.808, p<0.005).

Conclusions: Pupil size changes and mobility examination may be a fast, non-invasive and efficient additional diagnostic marker in AD diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF03324716DOI Listing
October 2007