Publications by authors named "Dietrich von Bonin"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Speech-guided breathing retraining in asthma: a randomised controlled crossover trial in real-life outpatient settings.

Trials 2018 Jun 25;19(1):333. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

Institute of Complementary Medicine, University of Bern, Fabrikstrasse 8, 3012, Bern, Switzerland.

Background: Breathing retraining techniques have received increased attention in the management of asthma, because there is growing evidence of the usefulness of such methods in improving quality of life, reducing symptoms and reducing bronchodilator use. Our study investigated the effect of anthroposophic therapeutic speech (ATS), which uses sounds and syllabic rhythm to improve articulation, breathing and cardiorespiratory interaction, in patients with asthma in a real-life outpatient setting.

Methods: In a randomised controlled crossover trial, patients with asthma in three centres in Switzerland and Germany were randomised to either receive 11 ATS sessions or to wait. Subsequently, patients changed either to wait or to receive ATS. Primary outcomes were changes from the beginning to the end of each phase in the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) and spirometry parameters. Secondary outcomes were changes in inhaled glucocorticoids, the Asthma Control Test (ACT), peak flow and asthma exacerbations.

Results: Altogether, 63 patients were randomised, of which 56 were enrolled and 49 completed the study. Statistically significant differences between the ATS groups and waiting control groups were found for the overall AQLQ score (d = 0.86, p = 0.001) and the domain scores for symptoms, activity limitation and emotional function as well as ACT score (d = 0.53, p = 0.048). No significant differences were observed in spirometry parameters, inhaled glucocorticoids, peak flow and days without asthma exacerbation per week. No serious adverse events occurred during ATS sessions.

Conclusions: ATS significantly improves asthma control and quality of life in patients with asthma. Whether ATS may improve lung function remains to be shown.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02501824 . Retrospectively registered on 8 July 2015.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13063-018-2727-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6019518PMC
June 2018

Can Speech-Guided Breathing Influence Cardiovascular Regulation and Mood Perception in Hypertensive Patients?

J Altern Complement Med 2018 Mar 27;24(3):254-261. Epub 2017 Oct 27.

6 Branch Organization OdA ARTECURA , Utzigen, Switzerland .

Objectives: Anthroposophic therapeutic speech (ATS) has been shown to positively influence heart rate variability (HRV) and cardiorespiratory coordination in healthy volunteers. This prospective, exploratory, pre-post study was performed to investigate ATS effects on baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), heart rate (HR), HRV by standard deviation of beat to beat intervals (SDNN), blood pressure (BP), and mood in hypertensive patients.

Design: Patients received three ATS treatments, alternating with three sham interventions (control). During the sessions, BP and electrocardiography were continuously recorded. BRS and SDNN were analyzed from those measurements. Changes in mood score were assessed by a questionnaire. All data were compared before and after intervention (ATS and control).

Results: Thirty-one patients participated, the majority diagnosed with arterial hypertension (22 out of 31). Pre-post analysis of the data revealed immediate and significant changes in hypertensive patients during control and ATS with respect to BRS (control: 6.57 to 6.92 msec/mmHg, p = 0.0349; ATS: 6.03 to 7.27 msec/mmHg, p < 0.0001), SDNN (control: 39 to 42 msec, p = 0.0058; ATS: 38 to 43 msec, p = 0.0003), and HR (control: 74 to 71 beats per minute [bpm], p < 0.0001; ATS: 74 to 70 bpm, p < 0.0001). In normotensive patients, those changes were generally less pronounced and less significant with respect to BRS (control: 8.13 to 8.56 msec/mmHg, p = 0.1102; ATS: 8.20 to 8.98 msec/mmHg, p = 0.0273), SDNN (control: 36 to 40 msec, p = 0.0002; ATS: 35 to 38 msec, p = 0.0556), and HR (control: 80 to 77 bpm, p < 0.0001; ATS: 80 to 78 bpm, p < 0.0011). Only in hypertensive patients significant long-term changes were observed for BRS (6.6 to 7.7 msec/mmHg, p = 0.0070), SDNN (39.1 to 45.5 msec, p = 0.0074), and HR (75.8 to 67.2 bpm, p = 0.0001). No significant long-term changes were observed in normotensive patients. The mean systolic BP did not change significantly during this study. Both ATS and control also yielded improvements in the mood summary score, which again were more apparent for ATS than for sham interventions, but these were more pronounced among normotensive patients (3.5 to 4.2) than for hypertensive patients (2.9 to 3.9).

Conclusion: The results indicate that ATS has the potential to improve cardiovascular parameters which play an important role in BP regulation capability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/acm.2017.0158DOI Listing
March 2018

Adaption of cardio-respiratory balance during day-rest compared to deep sleep--an indicator for quality of life?

Psychiatry Res 2014 Nov 9;219(3):638-44. Epub 2014 Jun 9.

Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition, Autonomic Lab, University Hospital Inselspital, University of Berne, Murtenstrasse 21, CH-3010 Bern, Switzerland. Electronic address:

Heart rate and breathing rate fluctuations represent interacting physiological oscillations. These interactions are commonly studied using respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) of heart rate variability (HRV) or analyzing cardiorespiratory synchronization. Earlier work has focused on a third type of relationship, the temporal ratio of respiration rate and heart rate (HRR). Each method seems to reveal a specific aspect of cardiorespiratory interaction and may be suitable for assessing states of arousal and relaxation of the organism. We used HRR in a study with 87 healthy subjects to determine the ability to relax during 5 day-resting periods in comparison to deep sleep relaxation. The degree to which a person during waking state could relax was compared to somatic complaints, health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression. Our results show, that HRR is barely connected to balance (LF/HF) in HRV, but significantly correlates to the perception of general health and mental well-being as well as to depression. If relaxation, as expressed in HRR, during day-resting is near to deep sleep relaxation, the subjects felt healthier, indicated better mental well-being and less depressive moods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2014.06.004DOI Listing
November 2014

Speech therapy changes blood circulation and oxygenation in the brain and muscle: a near-infrared spectrophotometry study.

Adv Exp Med Biol 2011 ;701:21-5

Clinic of Neonatology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

Recently it has been shown that artistic speech therapy (AST) has effects on heart rate variability. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether AST also affects hemodynamics and tissue oxygenation in the brain and skeletal muscle measured by near infrared spectrophotometry(NIRS). The results show that ATS has effects on important physiological parameters, i.e., it leads to a decrease in cerebral blood flow during recitation and to brain activation thereafter.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-7756-4_4DOI Listing
August 2011

Day-to-night time differences in the relationship between cardiorespiratory coordination and heart rate variability.

Physiol Meas 2008 Nov 9;29(11):1281-91. Epub 2008 Oct 9.

Integrated Studies of Anthroposophic Medicine, University of Witten/Herdecke, Gerhard-Kienle-Weg 4, 58313 Herdecke, Germany.

Heart rate variability (HRV) and cardiorespiratory coordination, i.e. the temporal interplay between oscillations of heartbeat and respiration, reflect information related to the cardiovascular and autonomic nervous system. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between spectral measures of HRV and measures of cardiorespiratory coordination. In 127 subjects from a normal population a 24 h Holter ECG was recorded. Average heart rate (HR) and the following HRV parameters were calculated: very low (VLF), low (LF) and high frequency (HF) oscillations and LF/HF. Cardiorespiratory coordination was quantified using average respiratory rate (RespR), the ratio of heart rate and respiratory rate (HRR), the phase coordination ratio (PCR) and the extent of cardiorespiratory coordination (PP). Pearson's correlation coefficient r was used to quantify the relationship between each pair of the variables across all subjects. HR and HRR correlated strongest during daytime (r = 0.89). LF/HF and PP showed a negative correlation to a reasonable degree (r = -0.69). During nighttime sleep these correlations decreased whereas the correlation between HRR and RespR (r = -0.47) as well as between HRR and PCR (r = 0.73) increased substantially. In conclusion, HRR and PCR deliver considerably different information compared to HRV measures whereas PP is partially linked reciprocally to LF/HF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0967-3334/29/11/004DOI Listing
November 2008

Oscillations of heart rate and respiration synchronize during poetry recitation.

Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 2004 Aug 8;287(2):H579-87. Epub 2004 Apr 8.

Department of Clinical Research, Gemeinschaftskrankenhaus Herdecke, Gerhard-Kienle-Weg 4, 58313 Herdecke, Germany.

The objective of this study was to investigate the synchronization between low-frequency breathing patterns and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) of heart rate during guided recitation of poetry, i.e., recitation of hexameter verse from ancient Greek literature performed in a therapeutic setting. Twenty healthy volunteers performed three different types of exercises with respect to a cross-sectional comparison: 1). recitation of hexameter verse, 2). controlled breathing, and 3). spontaneous breathing. Each exercise was divided into three successive measurements: a 15-min baseline measurement (S1), 20 min of exercise, and a 15-min effect measurement (S2). Breathing patterns and RSA were derived from respiratory traces and electrocardiograms, respectively, which were recorded simultaneously using an ambulatory device. The synchronization was then quantified by the index gamma, which has been adopted from the analysis of weakly coupled chaotic oscillators. During recitation of hexameter verse, gamma was high, indicating prominent cardiorespiratory synchronization. The controlled breathing exercise showed cardiorespiratory synchronization to a lesser extent and all resting periods (S1 and S2) had even fewer cardiorespiratory synchronization. During spontaneous breathing, cardiorespiratory synchronization was minimal and hardly observable. The results were largely determined by the extent of a low-frequency component in the breathing oscillations that emerged from the design of hexameter recitation. In conclusion, recitation of hexameter verse exerts a strong influence on RSA by a prominent low-frequency component in the breathing pattern, generating a strong cardiorespiratory synchronization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajpheart.01131.2003DOI Listing
August 2004

Effects of speech therapy with poetry on heart rate rhythmicity and cardiorespiratory coordination.

Int J Cardiol 2002 Jul;84(1):77-88

Department of Clinical Research, Gemeinschaftskrankenhaus, 58313, Herdecke, Germany.

Our objective was to study the effects of guided rhythmic speech with poetry, referred to as anthroposophical therapeutic speech (ATS), on binary differential heart rate dynamics (also called musical heart rate rhythmicity or HRR) as well as on classical spectral parameters during the 15 min after a speech exercise had ended. A total of 105 1-h sessions with speech or control exercises were performed in seven healthy subjects, with 15 sessions each. Heart rate was recorded with ambulatory solid state recorders. Sessions were divided into a 15-min baseline measurement (S1), 30 min of exercise and a 15-min effect measurement (S2). The overall binary pattern predominance (PP) as well as the frequency of predominant and cyclically recurrent cardiorespiratory phase locking patterns were calculated from HRR and their changes from S1 to S2 were compared with the changes in low and high frequency heart rate variability. The results showed that: (i) ATS provokes alterations in heart rate dynamics which are different from those after control exercises and which persist at least for 15 min following exercise; (ii) in comparison to spectral parameters of heart rate variability, pattern predominance discloses the effects of rhythmic speech exercises best; and (iii) cardiorespiratory phase locking patterns, which contribute most to the rhythm pattern predominance, are more prominent after ATS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0167-5273(02)00137-7DOI Listing
July 2002
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