Publications by authors named "Dietger W Niederwieser"

14 Publications

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Special report: Summary of the first meeting of African Blood and Marrow Transplantation (AfBMT) group, Casablanca, Morocco, April 19-21, 2018 held under the auspices of the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (WBMT).

Hematol Oncol Stem Cell Ther 2020 Dec 4;13(4):202-207. Epub 2019 Jun 4.

Hematology, pediatric oncology, Ibn Rochd University Hospital, University of Hassan II, Casablanca, Morocco.

The first meeting of the African Blood and Marrow Transplantation (AfBMT) was held in Casablanca from April 19, 2018 to April 21, 2018, with the aim of fostering hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) activity in Africa. Out of the 54 African countries, HSCT is available only in six (Algeria, Egypt, Morocco, Nigeria, South Africa, and Tunisia). During this meeting, African teams and international experts from the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (WBMT) gathered to share their experience and discussed ways to help fill the gap. Nurses and patients held their meeting in parallel. International support and collaboration can help by providing expertise adapted to local resources and regional population needs. Local engagement including government and private participants are necessary to initiate and develop local HSCT capability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hemonc.2019.05.003DOI Listing
December 2020

Prognostic relevance of DHAP dose-density in relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma: an analysis of the German Hodgkin-Study Group.

Leuk Lymphoma 2016 May 23;57(5):1067-73. Epub 2015 Dec 23.

a Internal Medicine I, German Hodgkin Study Group , University Hospital of Cologne , Cologne , Germany ;

Only 50% of patients with relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) can be cured with intensive induction chemotherapy, followed by high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). Based on the results of the HDR2 trial two courses of DHAP and subsequent HDCT/ASCT are the current standard of care in relapsed HL. In order to assess the prognostic relevance of DHAP dose density, we performed a retrospective multivariate analysis of the HDR2 trial (N=266). In addition to four risk factors (early or multiple relapse, stage IV disease or anemia at relapse, and grade IV hematotoxicity during the first cycle of DHAP) a delayed start of the second cycle of DHAP>day 22 predicted a significantly poorer progression-free survival (PFS, p=0.0356) and overall survival (OS, p=0.0025). In conclusion, our analysis strongly suggests that dose density of DHAP has a relevant impact on the outcome of relapsed HL patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10428194.2015.1083561DOI Listing
May 2016

Donor Lymphocyte Infusions for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Relapsing after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation: May We Predict Graft-versus-Leukemia Without Graft-versus-Host Disease?

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2015 Jul 19;21(7):1230-6. Epub 2015 Mar 19.

Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.

Donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) are an effective treatment for relapsed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT). Leukemia resistance and secondary graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) are major obstacles to success with DLI. The aim of this study was to identify pre-DLI factors associated with prolonged survival in remission without secondary GVHD. We retrospectively analyzed 500 patients treated with DLI for CML relapse (16% molecular, 30% cytogenetic, and 54% hematological) after alloSCT. The overall probabilities of failure- and secondary GVHD-free survival (FGFS) were 29% and 27% at 5 and 10 years after DLI, respectively. The type of relapse was the major factor influencing FGFS (40% for molecular and/or cytogenetic relapse and 20% for hematological relapse at 5 years, P < .001). Chronic GVHD before DLI and an interval <1 year between alloSCT and first DLI were independently associated with inferior FGFS in patients with molecular and/or cytogenetic relapse. Consequently, FGFS was 13%, 35%, to 56% at 5 years in patients with 2, 1, and 0 adverse features, respectively. In patients with hematological relapse, independent adverse prognostic factors for FGFS were initial dose of CD3(+) cells ≥ 50 × 10(6)/kg, donor-recipient sex mismatch, and chronic GVHD before DLI. FGFS was 0%, 17%, 33%, to 37% in patients with 3, 2, 1, and 0 adverse features, respectively. The probability of survival in remission without secondary GVHD was highest (>50% at 5 years) when DLI were given beyond 1 year from alloSCT for molecular and/or cytogenetic CML relapse that was not preceded by chronic GVHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2015.03.012DOI Listing
July 2015

Tracking in vivo dynamics of NK cells transferred in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation.

Eur J Immunol 2014 Sep 30;44(9):2822-34. Epub 2014 Jun 30.

Innate Immunity, Deutsches Rheuma Forschungszentrum, Berlin, Germany.

Haploidentical stem cell transplantation (haploSCT) offers an alternative treatment option for advanced leukemia patients lacking a HLA-compatible donor. Transfer of NK cells represents a promising therapeutic option in combination with SCT, as NK cells can promote graft versus leukemia with low risk of GVH disease. In this study, we show results from a phase I/II trial in which 24 acute myeloid leukemia patients underwent haploSCT in combination with early transfer of unmodified NK cells and observed a promising 2-year overall survival rate of 37%. By performing immunomonitoring and subsequent principal component analysis, we tracked donor NK-cell dynamics in the patients and distinguished between NK cells reconstituting from CD34(+) precursors, giving rise over time to a continuum of multiple differentiation stages, and adoptively transferred NK cells. Transferred NK cells displayed a mature phenotype and proliferated in vivo during the early days after haploSCT even in the absence of exogenous IL-2 administration. Moreover, we identified the NK-cell phenotype associated with in vivo expansion. Thus, our study indicates a promising path for adoptive transfer of unmodified NK cells in the treatment of high-risk acute myeloid leukemia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eji.201444586DOI Listing
September 2014

Improved relapse-free survival after autologous stem cell transplantation does not translate into better quality of life in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: lessons from the randomized European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation-Intergroup study.

Am J Hematol 2014 Feb;89(2):174-80

EBMT/Dept of Medical Statistics & Bioinformatics LUMC, Leiden, The Netherlands.

In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) medical progress is driven by clinical studies with relapse-free survival (RFS) as the primary endpoint. The randomized EBMT-Intergroup trial compared high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) to observation and demonstrated a substantial improvement of RFS without showing improved overall survival for the transplant arm. Here we report quality of life (QoL) information of the first 3 years following randomization from that study. The main objective was to assess the impact of treatment on QoL over time. Two secondary analyses were performed to further investigate the impact of ASCT and relapse on QoL. In the primary analysis, we demonstrate an adverse impact of ASCT on QoL which was largest at 4 months and continued throughout the first year after randomization. Further, we demonstrated a sustained adverse impact of relapse on QoL which worsened over time. Despite better disease control by ASCT the side effects thus turned the net effect towards inferior QoL in the first year and comparable QoL in the following 2 years after randomization. This study emphasizes the importance of information concerning QoL impacts when patients are counseled about treatments aimed at improving RFS in the absence of a survival benefit.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.23610DOI Listing
February 2014

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML): different treatment strategies versus a common standard arm--combined prospective analysis by the German AML Intergroup.

J Clin Oncol 2012 Oct 10;30(29):3604-10. Epub 2012 Sep 10.

Department of Internal Medicine A-Hematology, Oncology and Pneumology, University of Münster, Albert-Schweitzer Campus 1, Geb. A 1, 48129 Münster, Germany.

Purpose: Identifying true therapeutic progress in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) requires a comparison of treatment strategies and results on the basis of uniform patient selection. To foster comparability across five clinical studies, we introduced a common standard arm combined with a general upfront randomization and performed prospective analyses with adjustment for differences in prognostic baseline characteristics.

Patients And Methods: Whereas the studies' own regimens differed in chemotherapies, risk adaption, and guidelines for allogeneic stem-cell transplantation, the standard arm contained uniform cytarabine- and anthracycline-based standard-dose remission induction and high-dose consolidation courses.

Results: Of 2,995 evaluable patients aged 16 to 60 years, 290 patients were randomly assigned to the common standard arm. Seventy percent of the 290 achieved complete remissions (62% with complete recovery, 8% with incomplete recovery; 95% CI, 65% to 76%). Five-year survival probabilities were 44.3% (95% CI, 37.7% to 50.7%) for overall survival, 44.8% (95% CI, 37.0% to 52.2%) for relapse-free survival, and 31.5% (95% CI, 25.7% to 37.4%) for event-free survival. Neither the unadjusted survival probabilities of the Kaplan-Meier method nor their adjustment for prognostic variables in multiple Cox regression models led to statistically significant different results in the three survival end points when the outcomes of each study were compared with the standard arm.

Conclusion: A strictly prospective comparison of different treatment strategies in patients with AML did not show clinically relevant outcome differences when compared through a common standard treatment arm. The results provide a representative basis for further therapeutic approaches.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2012.42.2907DOI Listing
October 2012

Comparison of outcomes of HLA-matched related, unrelated, or HLA-haploidentical related hematopoietic cell transplantation following nonmyeloablative conditioning for relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2008 Nov;14(11):1279-87

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington 98109, USA.

We compared the outcome of nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) based on donor cell source. Ninety patients with HL were treated with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by HCT from HLA-matched related, n=38, unrelated, n=24, or HLA-haploidentical related, n=28 donors. Patients were heavily pretreated with a median of 5 regimens and most patients had failed autologous HCT (92%) and local radiation therapy (83%). With a median follow-up of 25 months, 2-year overall survivals, progression-free survivals (OS)/(PFS), and incidences of relapsed/progressive disease were 53%, 23%, and 56% (HLA-matched related), 58%, 29%, and 63% (unrelated), and 58%, 51%, and 40% (HLA-haploidentical related), respectively. Nonrelapse mortality (NRM) was significantly lower for HLA-haploidentical related (P=.02) recipients compared to HLA-matched related recipients. There were also significantly decreased risks of relapse for HLA-haploidentical related recipients compared to HLA-matched related (P=.01) and unrelated (P=.03) recipients. The incidences of acute grades III-IV and extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD, cGVHD) were 16%/50% (HLA-matched related), 8%/63% (unrelated), and 11%/35% (HLA-haploidentical related). These data suggested that salvage allogeneic HCT using nonmyeloablative conditioning provided antitumor activity in patients with advanced HL; however, disease relapse/progression continued to be major problems. Importantly, alternative donor stem cell sources are a viable option.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2008.08.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2647369PMC
November 2008

Favorable long-term follow-up results over 6 years for response, survival, and safety with imatinib mesylate therapy in chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia after failure of interferon-alpha treatment.

Blood 2008 Feb 11;111(3):1039-43. Epub 2007 Oct 11.

Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany.

Imatinib mesylate, a targeted inhibitor of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase, is the standard of care for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). A phase 2 trial of imatinib in late chronic-phase (CP) CML after interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) failure enrolled 532 patients, 454 with a confirmed diagnosis of CP CML. Median time from diagnosis was 34 months; median duration of imatinib treatment was 65 months. Cumulative best rates of major cytogenetic response (MCyR) and complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) were 67% and 57%, respectively. At the 5-year landmark, 184 (41%) of the 454 patients are in CCyR. At more than 6 years, 199 (44%) of the 454 patients remain on imatinib. Most responses occurred within 12 months of starting imatinib; however, some patients achieved initial MCyR and CCyR more than 5 years after imatinib initiation. Estimated rates of freedom from progression to accelerated phase (AP) and blastic phase (BP) and overall survival at 6 years were 61% and 76%, respectively. Both freedom from progression to AP/BP and overall survival (OS) were associated with cytogenetic response level at 12 months. No increase in rates of serious adverse events was observed with continuous use of imatinib for up to 6.5 years, compared with earlier time points. Imatinib continues to be an effective and safe therapy for patients with CP CML after failure of IFN.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2007-07-103523DOI Listing
February 2008

In chronic myeloid leukemia white cells from cytogenetic responders and non-responders to imatinib have very similar gene expression signatures.

Haematologica 2005 Apr;90(4):459-64

Oregon Health & Science University Cancer Institute, Portland, OR 97239, USA.

Background And Objectives: Imatinib induces complete cytogenetic responses (CCR) in the majority of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase (CP). However, a subgroup of patients is refractory at the cytogenetic level. Clinically, it would be advantageous to identify such patients a priori, since they may benefit from more aggressive therapy.

Design And Methods: To elucidate mechanisms underlying cytogenetic refractoriness, we used Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays to determine the transcriptional signature associated with cytogenetic refractoriness in unselected white blood or bone marrow cells from 29 patients with CML in first CP prior to treatment with imatinib. Patients with CCR within 9 months were defined as responders (n = 16) and patients lacking a major cytogenetic response (> 35% Philadelphia-positive metaphases) after 1 year were defined as non-responders (n = 13).

Results: Differences in gene expression between responders and non-responders were subtle. Stringent statistical analysis with multiple comparison adjustments revealed very few differentially expressed genes. Differentially expressed genes could not be confirmed in an independent test set.

Interpretation And Conclusions: We conclude that transcriptional profiling of unselected white cells is of limited value for identifying genes consistently associated with cytogenetic refractoriness to imatinib.
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April 2005

Allografting after nonmyeloablative conditioning as a treatment after a failed conventional hematopoietic cell transplant.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2003 Apr;9(4):266-72

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98109-1024, USA.

Outcomes with conventional allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after failed HCT are typically poor. To reduce transplantation-related mortality (TRM), 55 patients (median age, 43 years; range, 18-69 years) who had failed conventional autologous (n = 49), allogeneic (n = 4), or syngeneic (n = 2) HCT received human leukocyte antigen-matched related (n = 31) or unrelated (n = 24) donor allografts after nonmyeloablative conditioning with 2 Gy of total body irradiation or 2 Gy of total body irradiation and 90 mg/m(2) of fludarabine. Postgrafting immunosuppression consisted of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. One rejection occurred. Thirty-three patients died a median of 127 days (range, 7-834 days) after HCT: 21 of relapse, 11 of TRM, and 1 of suicide. The TRM rate on day 100 was 11% with an estimated 1-year TRM rate of 20% (95% confidence interval [CI], 9% to 31%). The median follow-up among the 22 survivors is 368 days (range, 173-796 days). Seventeen of 22 survivors are progression-free. One-year estimates of overall and progression-free survival rates are 49% (95% CI, 35% to 62%) and 28% (95% CI, 16% to 41%), respectively. Untreated disease at the time of allografting after nonmyeloablative conditioning increased the risk of death (hazard ratio = 2.4; P =.04). Although the length of follow-up is still short, it appears that encouraging outcomes can be achieved with nonmyeloablative conditioning in patients expected to have poor outcomes with conventional allografting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/bbmt.2003.50014DOI Listing
April 2003

Non-myeloablative allografting from human leucocyte antigen-identical sibling donors for treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission.

Br J Haematol 2003 Jan;120(2):281-8

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109, USA.

Many patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1) are ineligible for allogeneic transplantation as a result of age or medical problems other than leukaemia. Eighteen patients (median age 59 years, range 36-73 years) with de novo (n = 13) and secondary (n = 5) AML in morphological CR1, who were not candidates for conventional allografting, received non-myeloablative peripheral blood stem cell transplants from human leucocyte antigen identical sibling donors after conditioning with 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI; n = 10) or 2 Gy TBI and 90 mg/m2 of fludarabine (n = 8). Postgrafting immunosuppression was with cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. Two rejections were observed in patients not given fludarabine and one died with relapse. Overall, 10 patients died between 77 and 841 d, seven from relapse and three from non-relapse mortality (NRM). Day +100 NRM was 0% with a 1-year estimated NRM of 17%[95% confidence interval (CI) 0-35%]. The median follow-up among the eight survivors was 766 d (range, 188-1141 d). Seven of these eight survivors remain in complete remission (CR). One-year estimates of overall and progression-free survivals were 54% (95% CI 31-78%) and 42% (95% CI 19-66%) respectively. While follow-up is short, this analysis demonstrates that the procedure is sufficiently safe to be studied in a wider group of patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2141.2003.04057.xDOI Listing
January 2003