Publications by authors named "Diem Hong Tran"

12 Publications

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Simulated Microgravity Inhibits the Proliferation of Chang Liver Cells by Attenuation of the Major Cell Cycle Regulators and Cytoskeletal Proteins.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Apr 27;22(9). Epub 2021 Apr 27.

Animal Biotechnology Department, Institute of Tropical Biology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Ho Chi Minh 700000, Vietnam.

Simulated microgravity (SMG) induced the changes in cell proliferation and cytoskeleton organization, which plays an important factor in various cellular processes. The inhibition in cell cycle progression has been considered to be one of the main causes of proliferation inhibition in cells under SMG, but their mechanisms are still not fully understood. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of SMG on the proliferative ability and cytoskeleton changes of Chang Liver Cells (CCL-13). CCL-13 cells were induced SMG by 3D clinostat for 72 h, while the control group were treated in normal gravity at the same time. The results showed that SMG reduced CCL-13 cell proliferation by an increase in the number of CCL-13 cells in G0/G1 phase. This cell cycle phase arrest of CCL-13 cells was due to a downregulation of cell cycle-related proteins, such as cyclin A1 and A2, cyclin D1, and cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (Cdk6). SMG-exposed CCL-13 cells also exhibited a downregulation of α-tubulin 3 and β-actin which induced the cytoskeleton reorganization. These results suggested that the inhibited proliferation of SMG-exposed CCL-13 cells could be associate with the attenuation of major cell cycle regulators and main cytoskeletal proteins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22094550DOI Listing
April 2021

Evaluation of stemness marker expression in bovine ovarian granulosa cells.

Anim Reprod 2019 Oct 23;16(2):277-281. Epub 2019 Oct 23.

Animal Biotechnology Department, Institute of Tropical Biology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

The objective of this study was to assess the stemness marker expressions (Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2) of granulosa cells (GCs) collected from bovine ovarian follicles and expansion. The single bovine ovarian follicles were isolated and categorized into 4 groups according to their diameter including group A (<2 mm), group B (2-3 mm), group C (3-4 mm), and group D (>4 mm). Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunostaining were applied to evaluate the stemness marker expression of bovine GCs from ovarian follicles. We also estimated the stemness marker transcript expressions of GCs during expression by qRT-PCR. qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated that fresh GCs from bovine ovarian follicles expressed the stemness markers (Oct4, Nanog, Sox2). These markers were down-regulated during antral stage follicular development. We also estimated stemness marker transcript expressions of GCs which were isolated and expanded from ovarian follicles of group A. The qRT-PCR results showed that Oct4 and Sox2 transcript expressions were reduced during expansion while Nanog transcript was not expressed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21451/1984-3143-AR2018-0083DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7673596PMC
October 2019

Direct colorimetric LAMP assay for rapid detection of African swine fever virus: A validation study during an outbreak in Vietnam.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2020 Oct 16. Epub 2020 Oct 16.

College of Veterinary Medicine, Vietnam National University of Agriculture, Hanoi, Vietnam.

African swine fever (ASF) is a highly infectious viral disease with high mortality. The most recent ASF outbreak in Vietnam began in 2019, posing a threat to spread to the neighbouring Asian countries. Without a commercial vaccine or efficient chemotherapeutics, rapid diagnosis and necessary biosecurity procedures are required to control the disease. While the diagnostic method of ASF recommended by the World Organization of Animal Health is real-time PCR, the ideal diagnosis procedure including master mix setup, template extraction and a high-cost qPCR equipment for many samples being tested simultaneously is not portable. In this study, a colorimetric loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was modified and evaluated for ASF virus detection using crude serum samples collected from domestic pigs in Vietnam during the 2019 outbreak. The LAMP results can be readily visualized to the naked eye within 30 min without the requirement of DNA extraction and sophisticated equipment. The sensitivity, specificity and limit of detection of direct colorimetric LAMP assay were comparable to a commercial diagnostic real-time PCR kit. Results strongly indicate that the adapted colorimetric LAMP assay has a remarkable potential for the in-field diagnosis of ASF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbed.13879DOI Listing
October 2020

The cruciform DNA-binding protein Crp1 stimulates the endonuclease activity of Mus81-Mms4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

FEBS Lett 2020 Dec 16;594(24):4320-4337. Epub 2020 Oct 16.

NTT Hi-Tech Institute, Nguyen Tat Thanh University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mus81-Mms4 complex is a highly conserved DNA structure-specific endonuclease that plays essential roles in the processing of recombination intermediates that arise during the repair of stalled replication forks and double-stranded breaks. To identify novel factors functioning conjointly with Mus81-Mms4, we performed a biochemical screen and found that Crp1, a cruciform DNA-recognizing protein that specifically binds to DNA four-way junction structures, could stimulate the Mus81-Mms4 endonuclease. The specific protein interaction between Mus81-Mms4 and Crp1 was responsible for the stimulation observed. Multicopy expression of Crp1 could partially rescue the sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents of the sgs1∆mus81∆21-24N mutant. Our results provide insight into the functional role and interaction of Crp1 with other proteins involved in DNA repair.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/1873-3468.13931DOI Listing
December 2020

Detecting and microRNAs with loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP).

J Parasit Dis 2020 Jun 28;44(2):364-373. Epub 2019 Sep 28.

NTT Hi-Tech Institute, Nguyen Tat Thanh University, 300A Nguyen Tat Thanh, Ward 13, District 4, Ho Chi Minh City, 700000 Vietnam.

Fascioliasis is a parasitic infection typically caused by two common parasites of class Trematodo, genus , namely and The widespread of these species in water and food makes fascioliasis become a global zoonotic disease that affects 2.4 million people in more than 75 countries worldwide. Typically, and can be recognized by parasitological techniques to detect spp. eggs, immunological techniques to detect worm-specific antibodies, or by molecular techniques such as PCR to detect parasitic genomic DNA. Recently, miRNAs have been raised as a key regulator and potential diagnostic biomarkers of diseases, including parasitic infection. An isothermal PCR called loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is rapid, sensitive, and its amplification process is so extensive that making LAMP well-suited for field diagnostics. LAMP reactions for miRNA detection have been introduced and were able to detect the target miRNA amounts in the wide range of 1.0 amol to 1.0 pmol, exhibiting high selectivity to differentiate one-base between miRNA sequences. Here, we introduced a modified LAMP to detect a species-specific miRNA of and . Our method did not demand an initial heating step and the reactions had a high sensitivity that greater than 1000 times in comparison to that reported in previous studies. Most importantly, the technique could perform well with parasitic miRNA presenting in bovine serum samples without sophisticated equipment required. These results create a promising technique basis for some novel and simple device to diagnose fascioliasis and other parasitic infection diseases at point-of-care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12639-019-01164-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7244643PMC
June 2020

Chronic activation of hexosamine biosynthesis in the heart triggers pathological cardiac remodeling.

Nat Commun 2020 04 14;11(1):1771. Epub 2020 Apr 14.

Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.

The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) plays critical roles in nutrient sensing, stress response, and cell growth. However, its contribution to cardiac hypertrophic growth and heart failure remains incompletely understood. Here, we show that the HBP is induced in cardiomyocytes during hypertrophic growth. Overexpression of Gfat1 (glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase 1), the rate-limiting enzyme of HBP, promotes cardiomyocyte growth. On the other hand, Gfat1 inhibition significantly blunts phenylephrine-induced hypertrophic growth in cultured cardiomyocytes. Moreover, cardiac-specific overexpression of Gfat1 exacerbates pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and cardiac dysfunction. Conversely, deletion of Gfat1 in cardiomyocytes attenuates pathological cardiac remodeling in response to pressure overload. Mechanistically, persistent upregulation of the HBP triggers decompensated hypertrophy through activation of mTOR while Gfat1 deficiency shows cardioprotection and a concomitant decrease in mTOR activity. Taken together, our results reveal that chronic upregulation of the HBP under hemodynamic stress induces pathological cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure through persistent activation of mTOR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-15640-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7156663PMC
April 2020

Nucling, a novel apoptosis-associated protein, controls mammary gland involution by regulating NF-κB and STAT3.

J Biol Chem 2015 Oct 11;290(40):24626-35. Epub 2015 Aug 11.

From The Institute for Enzyme Research, Tokushima University, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan

Postpartum mammary gland involution is the physiological process by which the lactating gland returns to its pre-pregnant state. In rodent models, the microenvironment of mammary gland involution is sufficient to induce enhanced tumor cell growth, local invasion, and metastasis. Therefore, a deeper understanding of the physiological regulation of involution may provide in-depth information on breast cancer therapy. We herein identified Nucling as an important regulator of involution of the mammary gland. A knock-out mouse model was generated and revealed that postpartum involution were impaired in mice lacking Nucling. Involution is normally associated with an increase in the activation of NF-κB and STAT3, which is required for the organized regulation of involution, and was observed in WT glands, but not in the absence of Nucling. Furthermore, the loss of Nucling led to the suppression of Calpain-1, IL-6, and C/EBPδ factors, which are known to be essential for normal involution. The number of M2 macrophages, which are crucial for epithelial cell death and adipocyte repopulation after weaning, was also reduced in Nucling-KO glands. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrated that Nucling played an important role in mammary gland involution by regulating NF-κB and STAT3 signaling pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M115.673848DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4591840PMC
October 2015

Identification of DNA-binding proteins that interact with the 5'-flanking region of the human D-amino acid oxidase gene by pull-down assay coupled with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

J Pharm Biomed Anal 2015 Dec 23;116:94-100. Epub 2015 Feb 23.

Division of Enzyme Pathophysiology, The Institute for Enzyme Research (KOSOKEN), The University of Tokushima, 3-18-15 Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan; Division of Enzyme Literacy, The Institute for Enzyme Research (KOSOKEN), The University of Tokushima, 3-18-15 Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan; Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 3-18-15 Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan. Electronic address:

D-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a flavoenzyme that metabolizes D-amino acids and is expected to be a promising therapeutic target of schizophrenia and glioblastoma. The study of DNA-binding proteins has yielded much information in the regulation of transcription and other biological processes. However, proteins interacting with DAO gene have not been elucidated. Our assessment of human DAO promoter activity using luciferase reporter system indicated the 5'-flanking region of this gene (-4289 bp from transcription initiation site) has a regulatory sequence for gene expression, which is regulated by multi-protein complexes interacting with this region. By using pull-down assay coupled with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we identified six proteins binding to the 5'-flanking region of the human DAO gene (zinc finger C2HC domain-containing protein 1A; histidine-tRNA ligase, cytoplasmic; molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis protein; 60S ribosomal protein L37; calponin-1; calmodulin binding protein and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1). These preliminary results will contribute to the advance in the understanding of the potential factors associated with the regulatory mechanism of DAO expression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpba.2015.02.031DOI Listing
December 2015

Identification of two promoters for human D-amino acid oxidase gene: implication for the differential promoter regulation mediated by PAX5/PAX2.

J Biochem 2015 May 10;157(5):377-87. Epub 2014 Dec 10.

Division of Enzyme Pathophysiology; Division of Enzyme Literacy, The Institute for Enzyme Research (KOSOKEN), The University of Tokushima; and Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 3-18-15 Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan Division of Enzyme Pathophysiology; Division of Enzyme Literacy, The Institute for Enzyme Research (KOSOKEN), The University of Tokushima; and Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 3-18-15 Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan Division of Enzyme Pathophysiology; Division of Enzyme Literacy, The Institute for Enzyme Research (KOSOKEN), The University of Tokushima; and Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 3-18-15 Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan.

D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a flavoenzyme that metabolizes d-amino acids. Until now, the DAO expression mechanism is still unclear. Our assessment of human DAO (hDAO) promoter activity using luciferase reporter system indicated the proximal upstream region of exon1 (-237/+1) has promoter activity (P1). Interestingly, we identified an alternative promoter in the proximal upstream region of exon2 (+4,126/+4,929) (P2). This alternative promoter has stronger activity than that of P1. Our results also revealed a negative regulatory segment (+1,163/+1,940) in intron1; that would act in concert with P1 and P2. Bioinformatics analyses elucidated the conservation of transcription factor PAX5 family binding sites among species. These sites (-60/-31) and (+4,464/+4,493), locate in P1 and P2 of hDAO, respectively. Gel shift assays demonstrated P1 contains a site (-60/-31) for PAX5 binding while P2 has three sites for both paired box gene 2 (PAX2) and paired box gene 5 (PAX5) binding. The dual roles of PAX5 family in regulating hDAO transcription by modulating promoter activity of P1 and activating promoter activity of P2 were implicated based on the site-directed mutagenesis experiment. Altogether, our data suggested the differential regulation of hDAO expression by two promoters whose activities may be modulated by the binding of PAX2 and PAX5.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jb/mvu084DOI Listing
May 2015

Molecular signatures in Arabidopsis thaliana in response to insect attack and bacterial infection.

PLoS One 2013 25;8(3):e58987. Epub 2013 Mar 25.

Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.

Background: Under the threat of global climatic change and food shortages, it is essential to take the initiative to obtain a comprehensive understanding of common and specific defence mechanisms existing in plant systems for protection against different types of biotic invaders. We have implemented an integrated approach to analyse the overall transcriptomic reprogramming and systems-level defence responses in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana henceforth) during insect Brevicoryne brassicae (B. brassicae henceforth) and bacterial Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (P. syringae henceforth) attacks. The main aim of this study was to identify the attacker-specific and general defence response signatures in A. thaliana when attacked by phloem-feeding aphids or pathogenic bacteria.

Results: The obtained annotated networks of differentially expressed transcripts indicated that members of transcription factor families, such as WRKY, MYB, ERF, BHLH and bZIP, could be crucial for stress-specific defence regulation in Arabidopsis during aphid and P. syringae attack. The defence response pathways, signalling pathways and metabolic processes associated with aphid attack and P. syringae infection partially overlapped. Components of several important biosynthesis and signalling pathways, such as salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene (ET) and glucosinolates, were differentially affected during the two the treatments. Several stress-regulated transcription factors were known to be associated with stress-inducible microRNAs. The differentially regulated gene sets included many signature transcription factors, and our co-expression analysis showed that they were also strongly co-expressed during 69 other biotic stress experiments.

Conclusions: Defence responses and functional networks that were unique and specific to aphid or P. syringae stresses were identified. Furthermore, our analysis revealed a probable link between biotic stress and microRNAs in Arabidopsis and, thus gives indicates a new direction for conducting large-scale targeted experiments to explore the detailed regulatory links between them. The presented results provide a comparative understanding of Arabidopsis - B. brassicae and Arabidopsis - P. syringae interactions at the transcriptomic level.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0058987PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3607608PMC
December 2013

Transcriptional profiling of an Fd-GOGAT1/GLU1 mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana reveals a multiple stress response and extensive reprogramming of the transcriptome.

BMC Genomics 2010 Mar 22;11:190. Epub 2010 Mar 22.

Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway.

Background: Glutamate plays a central position in the synthesis of a variety of organic molecules in plants and is synthesised from nitrate through a series of enzymatic reactions. Glutamate synthases catalyse the last step in this pathway and two types are present in plants: NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent. Here we report a genome wide microarray analysis of the transcriptional reprogramming that occurs in leaves and roots of the A. thaliana mutant glu1-2 knocked-down in the expression of Fd-GOGAT1 (GLU1; At5g04140), one of the two genes of A. thaliana encoding ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase.

Results: Transcriptional profiling of glu1-2 revealed extensive changes with the expression of more than 5500 genes significantly affected in leaves and nearly 700 in roots. Both genes involved in glutamate biosynthesis and transformation are affected, leading to changes in amino acid compositions as revealed by NMR metabolome analysis. An elevated glutamine level in the glu1-2 mutant was the most prominent of these changes. An unbiased analysis of the gene expression datasets allowed us to identify the pathways that constitute the secondary response of an FdGOGAT1/GLU1 knock-down. Among the most significantly affected pathways, photosynthesis, photorespiratory cycle and chlorophyll biosynthesis show an overall downregulation in glu1-2 leaves. This is in accordance with their slight chlorotic phenotype. Another characteristic of the glu1-2 transcriptional profile is the activation of multiple stress responses, mimicking cold, heat, drought and oxidative stress. The change in expression of genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis is also revealed. The expression of a substantial number of genes encoding stress-related transcription factors, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, glutathione S-transferases and UDP-glycosyltransferases is affected in the glu1-2 mutant. This may indicate an induction of the detoxification of secondary metabolites in the mutant.

Conclusions: Analysis of the glu1-2 transcriptome reveals extensive changes in gene expression profiles revealing the importance of Fd-GOGAT1, and indirectly the central role of glutamate, in plant development. Besides the effect on genes involved in glutamate synthesis and transformation, the glu1-2 mutant transcriptome was characterised by an extensive secondary response including the downregulation of photosynthesis-related pathways and the induction of genes and pathways involved in the plant response to a multitude of stresses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2164-11-190DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2858750PMC
March 2010

A gene encoding a polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) shows developmental regulation and pathogen-induced expression in strawberry.

New Phytol 2004 Jul;163(1):99-110

Plantebiosenteret, Department of Biology, NTNU, 7491 Trondheim, Norway.

•  Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) have been demonstrated to play a role in host defence in several plants. •  The PGIP now cloned from strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) showed a high degree of homology to other fruit PGIPs. The gene expression of strawberry PGIP was monitored in healthy leaves, flowers and fruit at different maturity stages. PGIP transcript levels were also analysed following fruit inoculation with the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea in strawberry cultivars displaying variation in susceptibility. •  Healthy mature berries showed the highest constitutive PGIP gene expression levels compared with leaves, flowers and immature fruit, indicating that the gene is developmentally regulated. Among the cultivars studied ('Elsanta', 'Korona', 'Polka', 'Senga sengana', 'Tenira'), 'Polka' had the highest constitutive expression level of PGIP. After inoculation with B. cinerea, all five cultivars displayed a significant induction of PGIP gene expression, but the differences between them were not statistically significant. •  The high induction of the PGIP gene after inoculation with B. cinerea indicates that PGIP has a role in defence of strawberry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2004.01088.xDOI Listing
July 2004