Publications by authors named "Didier Wecker"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The IL-1β Antibody Gevokizumab Limits Cardiac Remodeling and Coronary Dysfunction in Rats With Heart Failure.

JACC Basic Transl Sci 2017 Aug 28;2(4):418-430. Epub 2017 Aug 28.

INSERM U1096, Rouen, France.

This study reports preclinical data showing that the interleukin (IL)-1β modulation is a new promising target in the pathophysiological context of heart failure. Indeed, in nondiabetic Wistar and diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats with chronic heart failure induced by myocardial infarction, administration of the IL-1β antibody gevokizumab improves 'surrogate' markers of survival (i.e., left ventricular remodeling, hemodynamics, and function as well as coronary function). However, whether IL-1β modulation per se or in combination with standard treatments of heart failure improves long-term outcome in human heart failure remains to be determined.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacbts.2017.06.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6034492PMC
August 2017

Short- and long-term administration of the non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist finerenone opposes metabolic syndrome-related cardio-renal dysfunction.

Diabetes Obes Metab 2018 10 27;20(10):2399-2407. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

Normandie Univ, UNIROUEN, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U1096, FHU- REMOD-VHF, 76000 Rouen, France.

Aim: To determine whether non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists oppose metabolic syndrome-related end-organ, i.e. cardiac, damage.

Materials And Methods: In Zucker fa/fa rats, a rat model of metabolic syndrome, we assessed the effects of the non-steroidal MR antagonist finerenone (oral 2 mg/kg/day) on left ventricular (LV) function, haemodynamics and remodelling (using echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging and biochemical methods).

Results: Long-term (90 days) finerenone modified neither systolic blood pressure nor heart rate, but reduced LV end-diastolic pressure and LV end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship, without modifying LV end-systolic pressure and LV end-systolic pressure-volume relationship. Simultaneously, long-term finerenone reduced both LV systolic and diastolic diameters, associated with reductions in LV weight and LV collagen density, while proteinuria and renal nGAL expression were reduced. Short-term (7 days) finerenone improved LV haemodynamics and reduced LV systolic diameter, without modifying LV diastolic diameter. Moreover, short-term finerenone increased myocardial tissue perfusion and reduced myocardial reactive oxygen species, while plasma nitrite levels, an indicator of nitric oxide (NO) bio-availability, were increased.

Conclusions: In rats with metabolic syndrome, the non-steroidal MR antagonist finerenone opposed metabolic syndrome-related diastolic cardiac dysfunction and nephropathy. This involved acute effects, such as improved myocardial perfusion, reduced oxidative stress/increased NO bioavailability, as well as long-term effects, such as modifications in the myocardial structure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dom.13393DOI Listing
October 2018

Enhanced Fluorine-19 MRI Sensitivity using a Cryogenic Radiofrequency Probe: Technical Developments and Ex Vivo Demonstration in a Mouse Model of Neuroinflammation.

Sci Rep 2017 08 29;7(1):9808. Epub 2017 Aug 29.

Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association, Berlin, Germany.

Neuroinflammation can be monitored using fluorine-19 (F)-containing nanoparticles and F MRI. Previously we studied neuroinflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) using room temperature (RT) F radiofrequency (RF) coils and low spatial resolution F MRI to overcome constraints in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This yielded an approximate localization of inflammatory lesions. Here we used a new F transceive cryogenic quadrature RF probe ( F-CRP) that provides the SNR necessary to acquire superior spatially-resolved F MRI. First we characterized the signal-transmission profile of the F-CRP. The F-CRP was then benchmarked against a RT F/H RF coil. For SNR comparison we used reference compounds including F-nanoparticles and ex vivo brains from EAE mice administered with F-nanoparticles. The transmit/receive profile of the F-CRP diminished with increasing distance from the surface. This was counterbalanced by a substantial SNR gain compared to the RT coil. Intraparenchymal inflammation in the ex vivo EAE brains was more sharply defined when using 150 μm isotropic resolution with the F-CRP, and reflected the known distribution of EAE histopathology. At this spatial resolution, most F signals were undetectable using the RT coil. The F-CRP is a valuable tool that will allow us to study neuroinflammation with greater detail in future in vivo studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-09622-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5575026PMC
August 2017

3D anatomical and perfusion MRI for longitudinal evaluation of biomaterials for bone regeneration of femoral bone defect in rats.

Sci Rep 2017 07 21;7(1):6100. Epub 2017 Jul 21.

Centre de Résonance Magnétique des Systèmes Biologiques, UMR5536, CNRS, Univ. Bordeaux, F-33076, Bordeaux, France.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) appears as a good surrogate to Computed Tomography (CT) scan as it does not involve radiation. In this context, a 3D anatomical and perfusion MR imaging protocol was developed to follow the evolution of bone regeneration and the neo-vascularization in femoral bone defects in rats. For this, three different biomaterials based on Pullulan-Dextran and containing either Fucoidan or HydroxyApatite or both were implanted. In vivo MRI, ex vivo micro-CT and histology were performed 1, 3 and 5 weeks after implantation. The high spatially resolved (156 × 182 × 195 µm) anatomical images showed a high contrast from the defects filled with biomaterials that decreased over time due to bone formation. The 3D Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) imaging with high temporal resolution (1 image/19 s) enabled to detect a modification in the Area-Under-The-Gadolinium-Curve over the weeks post implantation. The high sensitivity of MRI enabled to distinguish which biomaterial was the least efficient for bone regeneration, which was confirmed by micro-CT images and by a lower vessel density observed by histology. In conclusion, the methodology developed here highlights the efficiency of longitudinal MRI for tissue engineering as a routine small animal exam.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-06258-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5522444PMC
July 2017

Fast 3D ultrashort echo-time spiral projection imaging using golden-angle: A flexible protocol for in vivo mouse imaging at high magnetic field.

Magn Reson Med 2017 05 12;77(5):1831-1840. Epub 2016 May 12.

Centre de Résonance Magnétique des Systèmes Biologiques, UMR5536 CNRS, Bordeaux, France.

Purpose: To develop a fast three-dimensional (3D) k-space encoding method based on spiral projection imaging (SPI) with an interleaved golden-angle approach and to validate this novel sequence on small animal models.

Methods: A disk-like trajectory, in which each disk contained spirals, was developed. The 3D encoding was performed by tilting the disks with a golden angle. The sharpness was first calculated at different T2* values. Then, the sharpness was measured on phantom using variable undersampling ratios. Finally, the sampling method was validated by whole brain time-of-flight angiography and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) enhanced free-breathing liver angiography on mouse.

Results: The in vitro results demonstrated the robustness of the method for short T2* and high undersampling ratios. In vivo experiments showed the ability to properly detect small vessels in the brain with an acquisition time shorter than 1 min. Free-breathing mice liver angiography showed the insensitivity of this protocol toward motions and flow artifacts, and enabled the visualization of liver motion during breathing.

Conclusions: The method implemented here allowed fast 3D k-space sampling with a high undersampling ratio. Combining the advantages of center-out spirals with the flexibility of the golden angle approach could have major implications for real-time imaging. Magn Reson Med 77:1831-1840, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mrm.26263DOI Listing
May 2017

Water Selective Imaging and bSSFP Banding Artifact Correction in Humans and Small Animals at 3T and 7T, Respectively.

PLoS One 2015 1;10(10):e0139249. Epub 2015 Oct 1.

Centre de Résonance Magnétique des Systèmes Biologiques, UMR 5536, CNRS/University Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.

Introduction: The purpose of this paper is to develop an easy method to generate both fat signal and banding artifact free 3D balanced Steady State Free Precession (bSSFP) images at high magnetic field.

Methods: In order to suppress fat signal and bSSFP banding artifacts, two or four images were acquired with the excitation frequency of the water-selective binomial radiofrequency pulse set On Resonance or shifted by a maximum of 3/4TR. Mice and human volunteers were imaged at 7 T and 3 T, respectively to perform whole-body and musculoskeletal imaging. "Sum-Of-Square" reconstruction was performed and combined or not with parallel imaging.

Results: The frequency selectivity of 1-2-3-2-1 or 1-3-3-1 binomial pulses was preserved after (3/4TR) frequency shifting. Consequently, whole body small animal 3D imaging was performed at 7 T and enabled visualization of small structures within adipose tissue like lymph nodes. In parallel, this method allowed 3D musculoskeletal imaging in humans with high spatial resolution at 3 T. The combination with parallel imaging allowed the acquisition of knee images with ~500 μm resolution images in less than 2 min. In addition, ankles, full head coverage and legs of volunteers were imaged, demonstrating the possible application of the method also for large FOV.

Conclusion: In conclusion, this robust method can be applied in small animals and humans at high magnetic fields. The high SNR and tissue contrast obtained in short acquisition times allows to prescribe bSSFP sequence for several preclinical and clinical applications.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0139249PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4591352PMC
May 2016

Selective Heart Rate Reduction Improves Metabolic Syndrome-related Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction.

J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 2015 Oct;66(4):399-408

*Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U1096, Rouen, France; †Institute for Research and Innovation in Biomedicine, Rouen, France; ‡UFR de Médecine et Pharmacie, Rouen University, Rouen, France; §Plateau d'Imagerie CardioThoracique de l'Universite de Rouen, Rouen, France; ¶Equipe d'Acceuil 4651, Aliment Bioprocedes Toxicologie Environnement, Rouen, France; ‖Bruker Biospin MRI GMBH, Ettlingen, Germany; and **Servier, Suresnes, France.

Background: Enhanced heart rate observed in metabolic syndrome (MS) contributes to the deterioration of left ventricular (LV) function via impaired LV filling and relaxation, increased myocardial O2 consumption, and reduced coronary perfusion. However, whether heart rate reduction (HRR) opposes LV dysfunction observed in MS is unknown.

Methods: We assessed in Zucker fa/fa rats, a rat model of MS, the cardiovascular effects of HRR induced by the If current inhibitor S38844 (3 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1)).

Results: Delayed short-term (4 days) and long-term (90 days) HRR induced by S38844 reduced LV end-diastolic pressure and LV end-diastolic pressure-volume relation, increased myocardial tissue perfusion, decreased myocardial oxidized glutathione levels, and preserved cardiac output, without modifying LV end-systolic pressure and LV end-systolic pressure-volume relation, although only long-term S38844 opposed LV collagen accumulation. Long-term S38844 improved flow-induced endothelium-dependent dilatation of mesenteric arteries, while metabolic parameters, such as plasma glucose levels, and Hb1c, were never modified.

Conclusions: In rats with MS, HRR induced by the If inhibitor S38844 improved LV diastolic function and endothelium-dependent vascular dilatation, independent from modifications in metabolic status. Moreover, this improvement in cardiac function involves not only immediate effects such as improved myocardial perfusion and reduced oxidative stress but also long-term effects such as modifications in the myocardial structure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/FJC.0000000000000294DOI Listing
October 2015

Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition improves myocardial perfusion and function in experimental heart failure.

J Mol Cell Cardiol 2012 Mar 6;52(3):660-6. Epub 2011 Dec 6.

Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale U644, University of Rouen, Rouen, France.

The study addressed the hypothesis that soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibition, which increases cardiovascular protective epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), exerts beneficial effects in an established chronic heart failure (CHF) model. In CHF rats, left ventricular (LV) function, perfusion and remodeling were assessed using MRI and invasive hemodynamics after 42-day (starting 8 days after coronary ligation) and delayed 3-day (starting 47 days after coronary ligation) treatments with the sEH inhibitor AUDA (twice 0.25 mg/day). Delayed 3-day and 42-day AUDA increased plasma EETs demonstrating the effective inhibition of sEH. Delayed 3-day and 42-day AUDA enhanced cardiac output without change in arterial pressure, thus reducing total peripheral resistance. Both treatment periods increased the slope of the LV end-systolic pressure-volume relation, but only 42-day AUDA decreased LV end-diastolic pressure, relaxation constant Tau and the slope of the LV end-diastolic pressure-volume relation, associated with a reduced LV diastolic volume and collagen density. Delayed 3-day and, to a larger extent, 42-day AUDA increased LV perfusion associated with a decreased LV hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha. Both treatment periods decreased reactive oxygen species level and increased reduced-oxidized glutathione ratio. Finally, MSPPOH, an inhibitor of the EET-synthesizing enzyme cytochrome epoxygenases, abolished the beneficial effects of 3-day AUDA on LV function and perfusion. Augmentation of EET availability by pharmacological inhibition of sEH increases LV diastolic and systolic functions in established CHF. This notably results from short-term processes, i.e. increased LV perfusion, reduced LV oxidative stress and peripheral vasodilatation, but also from long-term effects, i.e. reduced LV remodeling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yjmcc.2011.11.015DOI Listing
March 2012

Improvement of left ventricular diastolic function induced by β-blockade: a comparison between nebivolol and metoprolol.

J Mol Cell Cardiol 2011 Aug 24;51(2):168-76. Epub 2011 May 24.

INSERM U644, Institut Fédératif de Recherches Multidisciplinaires sur les Peptides n°23 Institut de Recherche et d'Innovation Biomédicale de Haute Normandie, UFR de Médecine et de Pharmacie, Rouen, France.

Objectives: Enhanced adrenergic drive is involved in the development of left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction observed in metabolic syndrome (MS). Thus, β-blockers might improve LV dysfunction observed in MS, but whether this occurs is unknown.

Methods: We assessed in Zucker fa/fa rats the effects of short- (5 days) and long-term (90 days) metoprolol ('pure' β-blockade; 80 mg/kg/day) or nebivolol (β-blocker with vasodilating properties; 5mg/kg/day) treatment on LV hemodynamics and remodeling, as well as the long-term effects on coronary and peripheral endothelial dysfunction.

Results: At identical degree of β(1)-receptor blockade, metoprolol and nebivolol decreased heart rate to the same extent and preserved cardiac output via increased stroke volume. None of the β-blockers, either after long- or short-term administration, modified LV end-systolic pressure-volume relation. Both β-blockers reduced, after long-term administration, LV end-diastolic pressure, Tau and end-diastolic pressure-volume relation, and this was associated with reduced LV collagen density, but not heart weight. Similar hemodynamic effects were also observed after short-term nebivolol, but not short-term metoprolol. These short-term effects of nebivolol were abolished by NO synthase inhibition. At the vascular level, nebivolol, and to a lesser extend metoprolol, improved NO dependent coronary vasorelaxation, which was abolished by NO synthase inhibition.

Conclusions: In a model of MS, the β-blockers metoprolol and nebivolol improve to the same extent LV hemodynamics, remodeling and diastolic function, but nebivolol prevent more markedly endothelium dependent vasorelaxation involving a more marked enhancement of NO bio-availability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yjmcc.2011.05.012DOI Listing
August 2011