Publications by authors named "Didericke Rhebergen"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The joint effects of clinically relevant depressive symptoms and cardiovascular risk factors on incident cardiovascular disease among older adults in the community.

J Psychosom Res 2021 Oct 16;149:110572. Epub 2021 Jul 16.

Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; GGZ inGeest Specialized Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

Objective: To determine if there is a synergistic effect between clinically relevant depressive symptoms and cardiovascular risk factors that disproportionately increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) among older adults with depressive symptoms.

Methods: Data were obtained from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam, a longitudinal cohort study. N = 3091 respondents with up to seven years of follow-up were included. Incident CVD was based on self-report, medication use, general practitioners' diagnoses and causes of death. A score of ≥16 points on the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale indicated clinically relevant depressive symptoms. Risk factors included were sex, education, obesity, smoking, alcohol use, physical inactivity and diabetes mellitus. Data were analysed with Cox regression models. Measures of multiplicative and additive interaction were calculated to determine if the presence of both depressive symptoms and a risk factor amplified the risk of CVD.

Results: Of all participants, 12.6% had clinically relevant depressive symptoms and, after a median follow-up of six years, 15.7% developed CVD. Only the additive interaction between physical inactivity and depressive symptoms was statistically significant and explained 40.6% of the CVD risk among inactive persons with depressive symptoms.

Conclusion: In the general population, we did not detect synergistic effects for most risk factors. However, older adults with clinically relevant depressive symptoms and a physically inactive lifestyle appeared to be at a particularly high risk to develop CVD and may represent an important target for cardiovascular prevention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2021.110572DOI Listing
October 2021

Do Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Cardiovascular Disease Explain Sex Differences in Cognitive Functioning in Old Age?

J Alzheimers Dis 2021 ;80(4):1643-1655

Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Cardiology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: Sex differences in cognitive functioning in old age are known to exist yet are still poorly understood.

Objective: This study examines to what extent differences in cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular disease between men and women explain sex differences in cognitive functioning.

Methods: Data from 2,724 older adults from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam were used. Information processing speed and episodic memory, measured three times during six years of follow-up, served as outcomes. The mediating role of cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular disease was examined in single and multiple mediator models. Determinant-mediator effects were estimated using linear or logistic regression, and determinant-outcome and mediator-outcome effects were estimated using linear mixed models. Indirect effects were estimated using the product-of-coefficients estimator.

Results: Women scored 1.58 points higher on information processing speed and 1.53 points higher on episodic memory. Several cardiovascular risk factors had small mediating effects. The sex difference in information processing speed was mediated by smoking, depressive symptoms, obesity, and systolic blood pressure. The sex difference in episodic memory was mediated by smoking, physical activity, and depressive symptoms. Effects of smoking, LDL cholesterol, and diabetes mellitus on information processing speed differed between men and women.

Conclusion: Differences in cardiovascular risk factors between women and men partially explained why women had better cognitive functioning. A healthy cardiovascular lifestyle seems beneficial for cognition and sex-specific strategies may be important to preserve cognitive functioning at older age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JAD-201173DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8150475PMC
September 2021
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