Publications by authors named "Diane Choi"

6 Publications

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Glutamate Delta-1 Receptor Regulates Inhibitory Neurotransmission in the Nucleus Accumbens Core and Anxiety-Like Behaviors.

Mol Neurobiol 2021 Jun 26. Epub 2021 Jun 26.

Department of Pharmacology and Neuroscience, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE, USA.

Glutamate delta-1 receptor (GluD1) is a member of the ionotropic glutamate receptor family expressed at excitatory synapses and functions as a synaptogenic protein by interacting with presynaptic neurexin. We have previously shown that GluD1 plays a role in the maintenance of excitatory synapses in a region-specific manner. Loss of GluD1 leads to reduced excitatory neurotransmission in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the dorsal striatum, but not in the ventral striatum (both core and shell of the nucleus accumbens (NAc)). Here, we found that GluD1 loss leads to reduced inhibitory neurotransmission in MSNs of the NAc core as evidenced by a reduction in the miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current frequency and amplitude. Presynaptic effect of GluD1 loss was further supported by an increase in paired pulse ratio of evoked inhibitory responses indicating reduced release probability. Furthermore, analysis of GAD67 puncta indicated a reduction in the number of putative inhibitory terminals. The changes in mIPSC were independent of cannabinoid or dopamine signaling. A role of feed-forward inhibition was tested by selective ablation of GluD1 from PV neurons which produced modest reduction in mIPSCs. Behaviorally, local ablation of GluD1 from NAc led to hypolocomotion and affected anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. When GluD1 was ablated from the dorsal striatum, several behavioral phenotypes were altered in opposite manner compared to GluD1 ablation from NAc. Our findings demonstrate that GluD1 regulates inhibitory neurotransmission in the NAc by a combination of pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms which is critical for motor control and behaviors relevant to neuropsychiatric disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12035-021-02461-3DOI Listing
June 2021

A combinatorial cis-regulatory logic restricts color-sensing Rhodopsins to specific photoreceptor subsets in Drosophila.

PLoS Genet 2021 Jun 23;17(6):e1009613. Epub 2021 Jun 23.

Department of Biology, Integrated Sciences Complex, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.

Color vision in Drosophila melanogaster is based on the expression of five different color-sensing Rhodopsin proteins in distinct subtypes of photoreceptor neurons. Promoter regions of less than 300 base pairs are sufficient to reproduce the unique, photoreceptor subtype-specific rhodopsin expression patterns. The underlying cis-regulatory logic remains poorly understood, but it has been proposed that the rhodopsin promoters have a bipartite structure: the distal promoter region directs the highly restricted expression in a specific photoreceptor subtype, while the proximal core promoter region provides general activation in all photoreceptors. Here, we investigate whether the rhodopsin promoters exhibit a strict specialization of their distal (subtype specificity) and proximal (general activation) promoter regions, or if both promoter regions contribute to generating the photoreceptor subtype-specific expression pattern. To distinguish between these two models, we analyze the expression patterns of a set of hybrid promoters that combine the distal promoter region of one rhodopsin with the proximal core promoter region of another rhodopsin. We find that the function of the proximal core promoter regions extends beyond providing general activation: these regions play a previously underappreciated role in generating the non-overlapping expression patterns of the different rhodopsins. Therefore, cis-regulatory motifs in both the distal and the proximal core promoter regions recruit transcription factors that generate the unique rhodopsin patterns in a combinatorial manner. We compare this combinatorial regulatory logic to the regulatory logic of olfactory receptor genes and discuss potential implications for the evolution of rhodopsins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1009613DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8259978PMC
June 2021

Intracerebroventricular Administration of AAV9-PHP.B SYN1-EmGFP Induces Widespread Transgene Expression in the Mouse and Monkey Central Nervous System.

Hum Gene Ther 2021 Jun 1;32(11-12):599-615. Epub 2021 Jun 1.

Department of Neurology, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Udall Center of Excellence for Parkinson's Disease, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Viral vectors made from adeno-associated virus (AAV) have emerged as preferred tools in basic and translational neuroscience research to introduce or modify genetic material in cells of interest. The use of viral vectors is particularly attractive in nontransgenic species, such as nonhuman primates. Injection of AAV solutions into the cerebrospinal fluid is an effective method to achieve a broad distribution of a transgene in the central nervous system. In this study, we conducted injections of AAV9-PHP.B, a recently described AAV capsid mutant, in the lateral ventricle of mice and rhesus macaques. To enhance the expression of the transgene (the tag protein emerald green fluorescent protein [EmGFP]), we used a gene promoter that confers high neuron-specific expression of the transgene, the human synapsin 1 () promoter. The efficacy of the viral vector was first tested in mice. Our results show that intracerebroventricular injections of AAV9-PHP.B SYN1-EmGFP-woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional regulatory element resulted in neuronal EmGFP expression throughout the mice and monkey brains. We have provided a thorough characterization of the brain regions expressing EmGFP in both species. EmGFP was observed in neuronal cell bodies over the whole cerebral cortex and in the cerebellum, as well as in some subcortical regions, including the striatum and hippocampus. We also observed densely labeled neuropil in areas known to receive projections from these regions. Double fluorescence studies demonstrated that EmGFP was expressed by several types of neurons throughout the mouse and monkey brain. Our results demonstrate that a single injection in the lateral ventricle is an efficient method to obtain transgene expression in many cortical and subcortical regions, obviating the need of multiple intraparenchymal injections to cover large brain areas. The use of intraventricular injections of AAV9-PHP.B SYN1-EmGFP could provide a powerful approach to transduce widespread areas of the brain and may contribute to further development of methods to genetically target-specific populations of neurons.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/hum.2020.301DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8236560PMC
June 2021

Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamines (NNAL, NNN, NAT, and NAB) Exposures in the US Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study Wave 1 (2013-2014).

Nicotine Tob Res 2021 02;23(3):573-583

Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Introduction: The tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) are an important group of carcinogens found in tobacco and tobacco smoke. To describe and characterize the levels of TSNAs in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study Wave 1 (2013-2014), we present four biomarkers of TSNA exposure: N'-nitrosonornicotine, N'-nitrosoanabasine, N'-nitrosoanatabine, and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) which is the primary urinary metabolite of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone.

Methods: We measured total TSNAs in 11 522 adults who provided urine using automated solid-phase extraction coupled to isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. After exclusions in this current analysis, we selected 11 004 NNAL results, 10 753 N'-nitrosonornicotine results, 10 919 N'-nitrosoanatabine results, and 10 996 N'-nitrosoanabasine results for data analysis. Geometric means and correlations were calculated using SAS and SUDAAN.

Results: TSNA concentrations were associated with choice of tobacco product and frequency of use. Among established, every day, exclusive tobacco product users, the geometric mean urinary NNAL concentration was highest for smokeless tobacco users (993.3; 95% confidence interval [CI: 839.2, 1147.3] ng/g creatinine), followed by all types of combustible tobacco product users (285.4; 95% CI: [267.9, 303.0] ng/g creatinine), poly tobacco users (278.6; 95% CI: [254.9, 302.2] ng/g creatinine), and e-cigarette product users (6.3; 95% CI: [4.7, 7.9] ng/g creatinine). TSNA concentrations were higher in every day users than in intermittent users for all the tobacco product groups. Among single product users, exposure to TSNAs differed by sex, age, race/ethnicity, and education. Urinary TSNAs and nicotine metabolite biomarkers were also highly correlated.

Conclusions: We have provided PATH Study estimates of TSNA exposure among US adult users of a variety of tobacco products. These data can inform future tobacco product and human exposure evaluations and related regulatory activities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntaa110DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7885786PMC
February 2021

Effect of the Topical Repellent para-Menthane-3,8-diol on Blood Feeding Behavior and Fecundity of the Dengue Virus Vector .

Insects 2018 Jun 4;9(2). Epub 2018 Jun 4.

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA.

Dengue fever is an acute disease caused by the dengue virus and transmitted primarily by the mosquito . The current strategy for dengue prevention is vector control including the use of topical repellents to reduce mosquito biting. Although ,-diethyl-m-methylbenzamide (DEET) is the most common active ingredient in topical repellent products, para-menthane-3,8-diol (PMD) is also used commercially. Studies have indicated PMD reduced biting by 90⁻95% for up to 6⁻8 h, similar to the efficacy of DEET, depending on the testing environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the behavioral effects of PMD on blood feeding and fecundity to explore the potential impact of PMD on downstream mosquito life-history traits. Two experiments were performed. In both experiments, cohorts of female (Belize strain) were exposed to 20% PMD or ethanol for 10 min in a closed system and introduced to an artificial membrane feeding system. Following a 30min feed time, mosquitoes of Experiment 1 were killed and weighed as a proxy measure of blood meal, whereas mosquitoes of Experiment 2 were monitored for oviposition, a measure of fecundity. Results showed a statistically significant reduction ( < 0.001) in the percentage of that blood-fed when exposed to PMD (38%) compared to those non-exposed (49%). No significant difference in fecundity between test populations was indicated. These findings suggest that exposure of to 20% PMD may influence the probability of subsequent blood feeding but of those mosquitoes that do blood feed, egg-lay density is not affected. Further studies are warranted to investigate the full range of effects of PMD exposure on other life-history traits such as mating, to continue characterizing the potential effects of PMD to impact overall vector population dynamics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/insects9020060DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6023277PMC
June 2018

Effect of Spatial Repellent Exposure on Dengue Vector Attraction to Oviposition Sites.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2016 07 18;10(7):e0004850. Epub 2016 Jul 18.

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana, United States of America.

Background: Aedes aegypti is a primary vector of dengue virus (DENV), the causative agent of dengue fever, an arthropod-borne disease of global importance. Although a vaccine has been recommended for prevention, current dengue prevention strategies rely on vector control. Recently, volatile pyrethroids-spatial repellents-have received interest as a novel delivery system for adult Ae. aegypti control. Understanding the full range of behavioral effects spatial repellents elicit in mosquito species will be critical to understanding the overall impact these products have on vector populations and will guide expectations of efficacy against DENV transmission.

Methodology/principal Findings: The current study quantified changes in attraction of gravid Ae. aegypti to experimental oviposition sites following exposure to the spatial repellent transfluthrin. Responses were measured with two-choice olfaction bioassays using 'sticky-screens' covering cups to prevent contact with the oviposition substrate. Two cups contained a bacterial attractant composed of four species of bacteria in calcium alginate beads in water and two cups contained only deionized water. Results from 40 replicates (n = 780 females total per treatment) indicated an estimated difference in attraction of 9.35% ± 0.18 (p ≤ 0.003), implying that the transfluthrin-exposed mosquitoes were more attracted to the experimental oviposition sites than the non-exposed mosquitoes.

Conclusions/significance: Findings from this study will further characterize the role of spatial repellents to modify Ae. aegypti behavior related to dengue prevention specifically, and encourage innovation in vector control product development more broadly.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0004850DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4948784PMC
July 2016