Publications by authors named "Diana Zindel"

4 Publications

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The RESOLUTE consortium: unlocking SLC transporters for drug discovery.

Authors:
Giulio Superti-Furga Daniel Lackner Tabea Wiedmer Alvaro Ingles-Prieto Barbara Barbosa Enrico Girardi Ulrich Goldmann Bettina Gürtl Kristaps Klavins Christoph Klimek Sabrina Lindinger Eva Liñeiro-Retes André C Müller Svenja Onstein Gregor Redinger Daniela Reil Vitaly Sedlyarov Gernot Wolf Matthew Crawford Robert Everley David Hepworth Shenping Liu Stephen Noell Mary Piotrowski Robert Stanton Hui Zhang Salvatore Corallino Andrea Faedo Maria Insidioso Giovanna Maresca Loredana Redaelli Francesca Sassone Lia Scarabottolo Michela Stucchi Paola Tarroni Sara Tremolada Helena Batoulis Andreas Becker Eckhard Bender Yung-Ning Chang Alexander Ehrmann Anke Müller-Fahrnow Vera Pütter Diana Zindel Bradford Hamilton Martin Lenter Diana Santacruz Coralie Viollet Charles Whitehurst Kai Johnsson Philipp Leippe Birgit Baumgarten Lena Chang Yvonne Ibig Martin Pfeifer Jürgen Reinhardt Julian Schönbett Paul Selzer Klaus Seuwen Charles Bettembourg Bruno Biton Jörg Czech Hélène de Foucauld Michel Didier Thomas Licher Vincent Mikol Antje Pommereau Frédéric Puech Veeranagouda Yaligara Aled Edwards Brandon J Bongers Laura H Heitman Ad P IJzerman Huub J Sijben Gerard J P van Westen Justine Grixti Douglas B Kell Farah Mughal Neil Swainston Marina Wright-Muelas Tina Bohstedt Nicola Burgess-Brown Liz Carpenter Katharina Dürr Jesper Hansen Andreea Scacioc Giulia Banci Claire Colas Daniela Digles Gerhard Ecker Barbara Füzi Viktoria Gamsjäger Melanie Grandits Riccardo Martini Florentina Troger Patrick Altermatt Cédric Doucerain Franz Dürrenberger Vania Manolova Anna-Lena Steck Hanna Sundström Maria Wilhelm Claire M Steppan

Nat Rev Drug Discov 2020 07;19(7):429-430

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/d41573-020-00056-6DOI Listing
July 2020

HTRF Total and Phospho-YAP (Ser127) Cellular Assays.

Methods Mol Biol 2019 ;1893:153-166

IGF, Univ Montpellier, CNRS, INSERM, Montpellier, France.

The YAP protein is a co-transcription factor increasing the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and repressing the expression of genes important for cell differentiation and apoptosis. It is regulated by several inputs, like the Hippo pathway, through the action of kinases that phosphorylate YAP on several residues. The level of phosphorylation of the residues serine 127 (S127) of YAP is generally assessed in cellular models, native tissues, and organs, as a marker of YAP activity and location, and is regulated by numerous partners. This phosphorylation event is classically detected using a western blot technical approach. Here, we describe a novel approach to detect both the relative amount of total YAP (T-YAP assay) and the phosphorylation of the residue S127 of YAP (S127-P-YAP assay) using a HTRF-based method. This easy-to-run method can easily be miniaturized and allows for a high-throughput analysis in 96/384-well plate format, requiring less cellular material and being more rapid than other approaches.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-8910-2_13DOI Listing
June 2019

Identification of key phosphorylation sites in PTH1R that determine arrestin3 binding and fine-tune receptor signaling.

Biochem J 2016 11 13;473(22):4173-4192. Epub 2016 Sep 13.

MRC Toxicology Unit, University of Leicester, Leicester LE2 2RG, U.K.

The parathyroid hormone receptor 1 (PTH1R) is a member of family B of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), predominantly expressed in bone and kidney where it modulates extracellular Ca homeostasis and bone turnover. It is well established that phosphorylation of GPCRs constitutes a key event in regulating receptor function by promoting arrestin recruitment and coupling to G-protein-independent signaling pathways. Mapping phosphorylation sites on PTH1R would provide insights into how phosphorylation at specific sites regulates cell signaling responses and also open the possibility of developing therapeutic agents that could target specific receptor functions. Here, we have used mass spectrometry to identify nine sites of phosphorylation in the C-terminal tail of PTH1R. Mutational analysis revealed identified two clusters of serine and threonine residues (Ser489-Ser495 and Ser501-Thr506) specifically responsible for the majority of PTH(1-34)-induced receptor phosphorylation. Mutation of these residues to alanine did not affect negatively on the ability of the receptor to couple to G-proteins or activate extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer to monitor PTH(1-34)-induced interaction of PTH1R with arrestin3, we show that the first cluster Ser489-Ser495 and the second cluster Ser501-Thr506 operated in concert to mediate both the efficacy and potency of ligand-induced arrestin3 recruitment. We further demonstrate that Ser503 and Thr504 in the second cluster are responsible for 70% of arrestin3 recruitment and are key determinants for interaction of arrestin with the receptor. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the pattern of C-terminal tail phosphorylation on PTH1R may determine the signaling outcome following receptor activation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1042/BCJ20160740DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5103873PMC
November 2016

Engineered hyperphosphorylation of the β2-adrenoceptor prolongs arrestin-3 binding and induces arrestin internalization.

Mol Pharmacol 2015 Feb 25;87(2):349-62. Epub 2014 Nov 25.

Institut für Pharmakologie und Klinische Pharmazie, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Marburg, Germany (D.Z., M.B., C.K.); MRC Toxicology Unit, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom (A.J.B., A.B.T.); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Kuwait University, Kuwait (S.A.-S.); and University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, Wels, Austria (P.L., J.W.)

G protein-coupled receptor phosphorylation plays a major role in receptor desensitization and arrestin binding. It is, however, unclear how distinct receptor phosphorylation patterns may influence arrestin binding and subsequent trafficking. Here we engineer phosphorylation sites into the C-terminal tail of the β2-adrenoceptor (β2AR) and demonstrate that this mutant, termed β2AR(SSS), showed increased isoprenaline-stimulated phosphorylation and differences in arrestin-3 affinity and trafficking. By measuring arrestin-3 recruitment and the stability of arrestin-3 receptor complexes in real time using fluorescence resonance energy transfer and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we demonstrate that arrestin-3 dissociated quickly and almost completely from the β2AR, whereas the interaction with β2AR(SSS) was 2- to 4-fold prolonged. In contrast, arrestin-3 interaction with a β2-adrenoceptor fused to the carboxyl-terminal tail of the vasopressin type 2 receptor was nearly irreversible. Further analysis of arrestin-3 localization revealed that by engineering phosphorylation sites into the β2-adrenoceptor the receptor showed prolonged interaction with arrestin-3 and colocalization with arrestin in endosomes after internalization. This is in contrast to the wild-type receptor that interacts transiently with arrestin-3 at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, β2AR(SSS) internalized more efficiently than the wild-type receptor, whereas recycling was very similar for both receptors. Thus, we show how the interaction between arrestins and receptors can be increased with minimal receptor modification and that relatively modest increases in receptor-arrestin affinity are sufficient to alter arrestin trafficking.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/mol.114.095422DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4293452PMC
February 2015