Publications by authors named "Di Monte Cinzia"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The relation between sexuality and obesity: the role of psychological factors in a sample of obese men undergoing bariatric surgery.

Int J Impot Res 2020 Dec 17. Epub 2020 Dec 17.

Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Latina, Italy.

Obesity produces a significant deterioration in general and sexual health. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the impact of obesity on sexuality, illustrating the psychological constructs that may play a significant role in determining sexual functioning and satisfaction. During the psychological assessment for bariatric surgery eligibility, 171 obese men filled out a socio-demographic questionnaire, the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), the 20 Item-Toronto Alexithymia Scale, the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised, the Body Uneasiness Test, and the Obesity-related Disability test. A series of hierarchical multiple regression analyses highlighted how obese men sexual desire (F = 10.128, p < 0.001), erectile function (F = 63.578, p < 0.001), orgasmic function (F = 33.967, p < 0.001), intercourse satisfaction (F = 159.752, p < 0.001), and general satisfaction (F = 18.707, p < 0.001) were significantly associated with other IIEF sexual domains, difficulties in identifying feelings, psychopathological symptoms (such as depression and paranoid ideation), body image, and quality of life. Findings are useful for deepening understanding of obese male sexual response, and more generally, for analyzing the complex and multivariate relation between obesity and sexuality, supporting the need of a multidisciplinary approach to obesity care that includes professionals with specific training in sexology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41443-020-00388-2DOI Listing
December 2020

From Resilience to Burnout: Psychological Features of Italian General Practitioners During COVID-19 Emergency.

Front Psychol 2020 2;11:567201. Epub 2020 Oct 2.

Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

During the COronaVIrus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in Italy, general practitioners (GPs) are ensuring continued access to primary care for citizens while also absorbing more of the impact of the crisis than most professional groups. The aim of this study is to explore the relationships between dimensions of burnout and various psychological features among Italian GPs during the COVID-19 emergency. A group of 102 GPs completed self-administered questionnaires available online through Google Forms, including Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Resilience Scale, Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale Short Form (IU), and Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS). Cluster analysis highlighted four distinct burnout risk profiles: Low Burnout, Medium Risk, High Risk, and High Burnout. The High Burnout group showed both lower Resilience and lower CISS Task-oriented coping strategy than the Medium Risk group and higher IU Prospective than the Low Burnout group. Results of a linear regression analysis confirmed that CISS Emotion-oriented style positively predicted MBI Emotional Exhaustion, CISS Task-oriented and Emotion-oriented emerged as significant predictors (negatively and positively, respectively) of MBI Depersonalization, and Resilience positively predicted MBI Personal Accomplishment. In conclusion, the results showed that the COVID-19 emergency had a significant impact on GPs' work management. Implementing task-oriented problem management, rather than emotional strategies, appears to protect against burnout in these circumstances. It is possible that the emotions related to the pandemic are too intense to be regulated and used productively to manage the professional issues that the COVID-19 pandemic presents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.567201DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7566043PMC
October 2020