Publications by authors named "Devin Clark"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Identification of Racial Inequities in Access to Specialized Inpatient Heart Failure Care at an Academic Medical Center.

Circ Heart Fail 2019 11 29;12(11):e006214. Epub 2019 Oct 29.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, and Department of Medicine (E.F..L.), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.

Background: Racial inequities for patients with heart failure (HF) have been widely documented. HF patients who receive cardiology care during a hospital admission have better outcomes. It is unknown whether there are differences in admission to a cardiology or general medicine service by race. This study examined the relationship between race and admission service, and its effect on 30-day readmission and mortality Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study from September 2008 to November 2017 at a single large urban academic referral center of all patients self-referred to the emergency department and admitted to either the cardiology or general medicine service with a principal diagnosis of HF, who self-identified as white, black, or Latinx. We used multivariable generalized estimating equation models to assess the relationship between race and admission to the cardiology service. We used Cox regression to assess the association between race, admission service, and 30-day readmission and mortality.

Results: Among 1967 unique patients (66.7% white, 23.6% black, and 9.7% Latinx), black and Latinx patients had lower rates of admission to the cardiology service than white patients (adjusted rate ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.84-0.98, for black; adjusted rate ratio, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.72-0.97 for Latinx). Female sex and age >75 years were also independently associated with lower rates of admission to the cardiology service. Admission to the cardiology service was independently associated with decreased readmission within 30 days, independent of race.

Conclusions: Black and Latinx patients were less likely to be admitted to cardiology for HF care. This inequity may, in part, drive racial inequities in HF outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.119.006214DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7183732PMC
November 2019

Effects of local vanadium delivery on diabetic fracture healing.

J Orthop Res 2017 10 8;35(10):2174-2180. Epub 2017 Mar 8.

Department of Orthopaedics, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, 90 Bergen Street, Suite 7300, Newark, New Jersey 07101.

This study evaluated the effect of local vanadyl acetylacetonate (VAC), an insulin mimetic agent, upon the early and late parameters of fracture healing in rats using a standard femur fracture model. Mechanical testing, and radiographic scoring were performed, as well as histomorphometry, including percent bone, percent cartilage, and osteoclast numbers. Fractures treated with local 1.5 mg/kg VAC possessed significantly increased mechanical properties compared to controls at 6 weeks post-fracture, including increased torque to failure (15%; p = 0.046), shear modulus (89%; p = 0.043), and shear stress (81%; p = 0.009). The radiographic scoring analysis showed increased cortical bridging at 4 weeks and 6 weeks (119%; p = 0.036 and 209%; p = 0.002) in 1.5 mg/kg VAC treated groups. Histomorphometry of the fracture callus at days 10 and 14 showed increased percent cartilage (121%; p = 0.009 and 45%; p = 0.035) and percent mineralized tissue (66%; p = 0.035 and 58%; p = 0.006) with local VAC treated groups compared to control. Additionally, fewer osteoclasts were observed in the local VAC treated animals as compared to controls at day 14 (0.45% ± 0.29% vs. 0.83% ± 0.36% of callus area; p = 0.032). The results suggest local administration of VAC acts to modulate osteoclast activity and increase percentage of early callus cartilage, ultimately enhancing mechanical properties comparably to non-diabetic animals treated with local VAC. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2174-2180, 2017.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jor.23521DOI Listing
October 2017

Local ZnCl2 accelerates fracture healing.

J Orthop Res 2014 Jun 26;32(6):834-41. Epub 2014 Feb 26.

Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Department of Orthopaedics, 90 Bergen Street, Suite 7300, Newark, New Jersey, 07103.

This study evaluated the effect of local zinc chloride (ZnCl2 ), an insulin mimetic agent, upon the early and late parameters of fracture healing in rats using a standard femur fracture model. Mechanical testing, radiographic scoring, histomorphometry, qualitative histological scoring, PCNA immunohistochemistry, and local growth factor analysis were performed. Fractures treated with local ZnCl2 possessed significantly increased mechanical properties compared to controls at 4 weeks post fracture. The radiographic scoring analysis showed increased cortical bridging at 4 weeks in the 1.0 (p=0.0015) and 3.0 (p<0.0001) mg/kg ZnCl2 treated groups. Histomorphometry of the fracture callus at day 7 showed 177% increase (p=0.036) in percent cartilage and 133% increase (p=0.002) in percent mineralized tissue with local ZnCl2 treatment compared to controls. Qualitative histological scoring showed a 2.1× higher value at day 7 in the ZnCl2 treated group compared to control (p = 0.004). Cell proliferation and growth factors, VEGF and IGF-I, within fracture calluses treated with local ZnCl2 were increased at day 7. The results suggest local administration of ZnCl2 increases cell proliferation, causing increased growth factor production which yields improved chondrogenesis and endochondral ossification. Ultimately, these events lead to accelerated fracture healing as early as 4 weeks post fracture.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jor.22593DOI Listing
June 2014