Publications by authors named "Derek Tinsley"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Managing complex mixtures of chemicals--a forward look from the regulators' perspective.

Ecotoxicology 2004 Jul;13(5):485-92

Environment Agency, Evenlode House, Howbery Park, Wallingford, Oxon OX10 8BD, UK.

The key findings to emerge from the successful Direct Toxicity Assessment Demonstration Programme are reviewed. At present, whole sample toxicity tests can identify and help control releases of complex mixtures that are likely to cause short-term toxic effects. Protection of aquatic organisms from the many hazardous chemicals that enter the environment, usually as complex mixtures, will require the introduction of new and improved techniques that are affordable and provide rapid turnaround of information. A number of bioassays were rigorously tested during the DTA programme. Further developments are suggested and other methods, including biosensors, biomarkers, and biological survey are briefly reviewed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/b:ectx.0000035298.28258.50DOI Listing
July 2004

Estimating spatial patterns of effluent exposure concentrations in direct toxicity assessment studies.

Ecotoxicology 2004 Jul;13(5):449-61

Environmental Consultant, The Barn and Oast, North Lane, South Street, Boughton-under-Blean, Faversham, Kent ME13 9NN, UK.

Hydrodynamic models of differing scale and complexity were used to estimate spatial patterns of effluent concentration in discharge plumes in the River Esk and the Lower Tees Estuary. The output from the Tees model was used, in conjunction with measurements of toxicity determined in short-term oyster embryo tests, to predict contours/zones of toxicity in the estuary associated with effluent discharges from four chemical processing sites. One of the discharges also combined the input from a municipal sewage treatment works. The models appeared to be effective in predicting patterns of dilution and dispersion of the effluent discharges in the respective receiving environments. Confirmation of the predictive capabilities of the Tees model was achieved by comparing predicted and measured toxicity in different regions of the plumes associated with the four discharges. Differences between predicted and measured toxicity for two of the four discharges were explicable in terms of failure to take account of the effects of real-time wind conditions when test samples were collected or overlap of adjacent discharge plumes. Suggested refinements to the models and measurement of effluent toxicity would further enhance the utility of this approach for determining the extent and significance of the effects of effluent discharges in receiving environments.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/b:ectx.0000035295.97557.6bDOI Listing
July 2004

The use of direct toxicity assessment in the assessment and control of complex effluents in the UK: a demonstration programme.

Ecotoxicology 2004 Jul;13(5):423-36

Environment Agency, National Centre for Ecotoxicology and Hazardous Substances, Evenlode House, Howbery Park, Wallingford, Oxon. OX10 8BD, UK.

This paper outlines the background, objectives, methodology, findings, outputs and recommendations from the Direct Toxicity Assessment (DTA) Demonstration Programme. This was a trial of a suite of bioassay methods and a seven-step protocol designed to deliver water quality improvements in catchments with well-defined water quality problems, where ecotoxicity from effluents was a contributing factor. The trial was run as a collaborative venture between the environmental regulators and water and manufacturing industries in the UK and was conducted at three project sites: -a reach of the river Aire near the city of Bradford in Yorkshire; -a reach of the River Esk near the town of Langholm on the border between Scotland and England; and -the lower Tees estuary on the north-east coast of England. The outcomes of each project are summarised in this paper. The learning points delivered by the programme were used to make recommendations to the regulators on how best to use bioassays for the assessment and control of complex effluents in the UK. Guidance was provided on how to carry out the bioassays and on how to use the data generated for regulatory decision-making. The programme also demonstrated how the regulators and the regulated can successfully work together to tackle environmental issues and deliver effective and workable solutions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/b:ectx.0000035293.45360.f6DOI Listing
July 2004