Publications by authors named "Dennis Lammertsma"

4 Publications

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The aerobiome uncovered: Multi-marker metabarcoding reveals potential drivers of turn-over in the full microbial community in the air.

Environ Int 2021 09 12;154:106551. Epub 2021 Apr 12.

Wageningen Environmental Research, Wageningen University & Research, PO Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen, the Netherlands.

Air is a major conduit for the dispersal of organisms at the local and the global scale. Most research has focused on the dispersal of plants, vertebrates and human disease agents. However, the air represents a key dispersal medium also for bacteria, fungi and protists. Many of those represent potential pathogens of animals and plants and have until now gone largely unrecorded. Here we studied the turnover in composition of the entire aerobiome, the collective diversity of airborne microorganisms. For that we performed daily analyses of all prokaryotes and eukaryotes (including plants) using multi-marker high-throughput sequencing for a total of three weeks. We linked the resulting communities to local weather conditions, to assess determinants of aerobiome composition and distribution. We observed hundreds of microbial taxa, mostly belonging to spore-forming organisms including fungi, but also protists. Additionally, we detected many potential human- and plant-pathogens. Community composition fluctuated on a daily basis and was linked to concurrent weather conditions, particularly air pressure and temperature. Using network analyses, we identified taxonomically diverse groups of organisms with correlated temporal dynamics. In part, this was due to co-variation with environmental conditions, while we could also detect specific host-parasite interactions. This study provides the first full inventory of the aerobiome and identifies putative drivers of its dynamics in terms of taxon composition. This knowledge can help develop early warning systems against pathogens and improve our understanding of microbial dispersal.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2021.106551DOI Listing
September 2021

Land-use and land-management change: relationships with earthworm and fungi communities and soil structural properties.

BMC Ecol 2013 Dec 1;13:46. Epub 2013 Dec 1.

Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Maclean Building, Benson Lane, Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford, Oxon OX10 8BB, UK.

Background: Change in land use and management can impact massively on soil ecosystems. Ecosystem engineers and other functional biodiversity in soils can be influenced directly by such change and this in turn can affect key soil functions. Here, we employ meta-analysis to provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of changes in land use and land management across a range of successional/extensification transitions (conventional arable → no or reduced tillage → grassland → wooded land) on community metrics for two functionally important soil taxa, earthworms and fungi. An analysis of the relationships between community change and soil structural properties was also included.

Results: Meta-analysis highlighted a consistent trend of increased earthworm and fungal community abundances and complexity following transitions to lower intensity and later successional land uses. The greatest changes were seen for early stage transitions, such as introduction of reduced tillage regimes and conversion to grassland from arable land. Not all changes, however, result in positive effects on the assessed community metrics. For example, whether woodland conversion positively or negatively affects community size and complexity depends on woodland type and, potentially, the changes in soil properties, such as pH, that may occur during conversion. Alterations in soil communities tended to facilitate subsequent changes in soil structure and hydrology. For example, increasing earthworm abundances and functional group composition were shown to be positively correlated with water infiltration rate (dependent on tillage regime and habitat characteristics); while positive changes in fungal biomass measures were positively associated with soil microaggregate stability.

Conclusions: These findings raise the potential to manage landscapes to increase ecosystem service provision from soil biota in relation to regulation of soil structure and water flow.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6785-13-46DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4219611PMC
December 2013

Cadmium accumulation in small mammals: species traits, soil properties, and spatial habitat use.

Environ Sci Technol 2011 Sep 2;45(17):7497-502. Epub 2011 Aug 2.

Alterra, Wageningen UR, PO-Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands.

In this study, the impact of species-specific spatial habitat use, diet preferences, and soil concentrations and properties on the accumulation of cadmium in small mammals was investigated. The results show that for the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus), a mobile species with a large range in diet composition, accumulation of cadmium was not related to local soil concentrations or soil properties, but to diet preferences. For the common vole (Microtus arvalis), a nonmobile, specific feeding species, accumulation of cadmium was related to local soil concentrations or properties. For the bank vole (Myodes glareolus), a species with a smaller home range than the wood mouse but a broader diet spectrum than the common vole, both local soil properties and diet appeared to affect the cadmium accumulation in the kidneys. The results of this field study show that species-specific traits of small mammals are important determinants of accumulation of cadmium on a local scale. For site-specific assessment of risks of contaminants, such information is essential in order to understand exposure dynamics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es200872pDOI Listing
September 2011

Effects of soil properties on food web accumulation of heavy metals to the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus).

Environ Pollut 2010 Jan 3;158(1):245-51. Epub 2009 Aug 3.

Alterra, Wageningen UR, Box 47, NL-6700AA, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Effects of soil properties on the accumulation of metals to wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) were evaluated at two sites with different pH and organic matter content of the soil. pH and organic matter content significantly affected accumulation of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in earthworms and vegetation. For Cd, Cu and Zn these effects propagated through the food web to the wood mouse. Soil-to-kidney ratios differed between sites: Cd: 0.15 versus 3.52, Cu: 0.37 versus 1.30 and Zn: 0.33-0.83. This was confirmed in model calculations for Cd and Zn. Results indicate that total soil concentrations may be unsuitable indicators for risks that metals pose to wildlife. Furthermore, environmental managers may, unintentionally, change soil properties while taking specific environmental measures. In this way they may affect risks of metals to wildlife, even without changes in total soil concentrations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2009.07.013DOI Listing
January 2010
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