Publications by authors named "Denise Pinessi"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Tumor vascular remodeling by thrombospondin-1 enhances drug delivery and antineoplastic activity.

Matrix Biol 2021 Sep 12;103-104:22-36. Epub 2021 Oct 12.

Laboratory of Tumor Microenvironment, Department of Oncology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri IRCCS, 24126 Bergamo, Italy. Electronic address:

The disorganized and inefficient tumor vasculature is a major obstacle to the delivery and efficacy of antineoplastic treatments. Antiangiogenic agents can normalize the tumor vessels, improving vessel function and boosting the distribution and activity of chemotherapy. The type III repeats (T3R) domain of thrombospondin-1 contains different potential antiangiogenic sequences. We therefore hypothesized that it might affect the tumor vasculature. Ectopic expression of the T3R domain by the tumor cells or by the host, or administration of recombinant T3R, delayed the in vivo growth of experimental tumors. Tumors presented marked reorganization of the vasculature, with abundant but smaller vessels, associated with substantially less necrosis. Mechanistically, the use of truncated forms of the domain, containing different active sequences, pointed to the FGF2/FGFR/ERK axis as a target for T3R activity. Along with reduced necrosis, the expression of T3R promoted tumor distribution of chemotherapy (paclitaxel), with a higher drug concentration and more homogeneous distribution, as assessed by HPLC and MALDI imaging mass spectrometry. T3R-expressing tumors were more responsive to paclitaxel and cisplatin. This study shows that together with its known role as a canonical inhibitor of angiogenesis, thrombospondin-1 can also remodel tumor blood vessels, affecting the morphological and functional properties of the tumor vasculature. The ability of T3R to reduce tumor growth and improve the response to chemotherapy opens new perspectives for therapeutic strategies based on T3R to be used in combination therapies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.matbio.2021.10.001DOI Listing
September 2021

Alternative Vascularization Mechanisms in Tumor Resistance to Therapy.

Cancers (Basel) 2021 Apr 15;13(8). Epub 2021 Apr 15.

Laboratory of Tumor Microenvironment, Department of Oncology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri IRCCS, 24126 Bergamo, Italy.

Blood vessels in tumors are formed through a variety of different mechanisms, each generating vessels with peculiar structural, molecular, and functional properties. This heterogeneity has a major impact on tumor response or resistance to antineoplastic therapies and is now emerging as a promising target for strategies to prevent drug resistance and improve the distribution and efficacy of antineoplastic treatments. This review presents evidence of how different mechanisms of tumor vessel formation (vasculogenesis, glomeruloid proliferation, intussusceptive angiogenesis, vasculogenic mimicry, and vessel co-option) affect tumor responses to antiangiogenic and antineoplastic therapies, but also how therapies can promote alternative mechanisms of vessel formation, contributing to tumor recurrence, malignant progression, and acquired drug resistance. We discuss the possibility of tailoring treatment strategies to overcome vasculature-mediated drug resistance or to improve drug distribution and efficacy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers13081912DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8071410PMC
April 2021

Antimetastatic and antiangiogenic activity of trabectedin in cutaneous melanoma.

Carcinogenesis 2019 04;40(2):303-312

Laboratory of Cancer Pharmacology, Department of Oncology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri IRCCS, Milan, Italy.

Trabectedin is a marine-derived antineoplastic drug. Besides targeting the cancer cells, trabectedin has a peculiar activity on the tumor microenvironment with marked effects on the vasculature and the immune response. Because a favorable microenvironment is a key factor in the progression of cutaneous melanoma, we hypothesized that trabectedin might affect the growth and metastasis of this highly aggressive cancer. This study shows that trabectedin inhibited the subcutaneous growth of the murine melanoma B16-BL6 and K1735-M2. In line with its known activities on the environment of other tumor types, it caused a significant reduction of tumor blood vessel density and tumor-associated macrophages. Trabectedin had a significant antimetastatic activity, inhibiting the formation of lung colonies following intravenous injection of B16-BL6 or K1735-M2 cells. The drug was also active in a clinically relevant spontaneous metastasis assay, where it inhibited lung metastasis when administered before (neoadjuvant) or after (adjuvant) surgical removal of the primary tumor. Relevant to its antimetastatic activity, trabectedin inhibited melanoma cell invasiveness in vitro, associated with increased tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 production and alteration in cell shape and cytoskeleton organization. This study shows that trabectedin affects melanoma growth and metastasis, acting with tumor-dependent mechanisms on both the tumor cells and the vascular and the inflammatory tumor microenvironment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgy177DOI Listing
April 2019

The calcium-binding type III repeats domain of thrombospondin-2 binds to fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2).

Angiogenesis 2019 02 30;22(1):133-144. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Tumor Angiogenesis Unit, Department of Oncology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri IRCCS, Via Stezzano, 87, Bergamo, 24126, Italy.

Thrombospondin (TSP)-1 and TSP-2 share similar structures and functions, including a remarkable antiangiogenic activity. We have previously demonstrated that a mechanism of the antiangiogenic activity of TSP-1 is the interaction of its type III repeats domain with fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), affecting the growth factor bioavailability and angiogenic activity. Since the type III repeats domain is conserved in TSP-2, this study aimed at investigating whether also TSP-2 retained the ability to interact with FGF2. The FGF2 binding properties of TSP-1 and TSP-2 and their recombinant domains were analyzed by solid-phase binding and surface plasmon resonance assays. TSP-2 bound FGF2 with high affinity (Kd = 1.3 nM). TSP-2/FGF2 binding was inhibited by calcium and heparin. The FGF2-binding domain of TSP-2 was located in the type III repeats and the minimal interacting sequence was identified as the GVTDEKD peptide in repeat 3C, corresponding to KIPDDRD, the active sequence of TSP-1. A second putative FGF2 binding sequence was also identified in repeat 11C of both TSPs. Computational docking analysis predicted that both the TSP-2 and TSP-1-derived heptapeptides interacted with FGF2 with comparable binding properties. Accordingly, small molecules based on the TSP-1 active sequence blocked TSP-2/FGF2 interaction. Binding of TSP-2 to FGF2 impaired the growth factor ability to interact with its cellular receptors, since TSP-2-derived fragments prevented the binding of FGF2 to both heparin (used as a structural analog of heparan sulfate proteoglycans) and FGFR-1. These findings identify TSP-2 as a new FGF2 ligand that shares with TSP-1 the same molecular requirements for interaction with the growth factor and a comparable capacity to block FGF2 interaction with proangiogenic receptors. These features likely contribute to TSP-2 antiangiogenic and antineoplastic activity, providing the rationale for future therapeutic applications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10456-018-9644-3DOI Listing
February 2019

Integrating computational and chemical biology tools in the discovery of antiangiogenic small molecule ligands of FGF2 derived from endogenous inhibitors.

Sci Rep 2016 Mar 22;6:23432. Epub 2016 Mar 22.

Tumor Angiogenesis Unit, Department of Oncology, IRCCS-Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Bergamo, 24126 Italy.

The FGFs/FGFRs system is a recognized actionable target for therapeutic approaches aimed at inhibiting tumor growth, angiogenesis, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. We previously identified a non-peptidic compound (SM27) that retains the structural and functional properties of the FGF2-binding sequence of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), a major endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis. Here we identified new small molecule inhibitors of FGF2 based on the initial lead. A similarity-based screening of small molecule libraries, followed by docking calculations and experimental studies, allowed selecting 7 bi-naphthalenic compounds that bound FGF2 inhibiting its binding to both heparan sulfate proteoglycans and FGFR-1. The compounds inhibit FGF2 activity in in vitro and ex vivo models of angiogenesis, with improved potency over SM27. Comparative analysis of the selected hits, complemented by NMR and biochemical analysis of 4 newly synthesized functionalized phenylamino-substituted naphthalenes, allowed identifying the minimal stereochemical requirements to improve the design of naphthalene sulfonates as FGF2 inhibitors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep23432DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4802308PMC
March 2016

Expression of thrombospondin-1 by tumor cells in patient-derived ovarian carcinoma xenografts.

Connect Tissue Res 2015 15;56(5):355-63. Epub 2015 Jun 15.

a Department of Oncology , Tumor Angiogenesis Unit, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri , Bergamo , Italy .

Purpose: Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), a major regulator of cell interaction with the environment, is often deregulated in cancers, including ovarian carcinoma. Both the tumor and the host cells can release TSP-1 in the tumor microenvironment. The relative contribution of the two sources in determining TSP-1 levels in ovarian cancer remains to be elucidated. This study was designed to investigate the expression of tumor TSP-1 in a panel of 29 patient-derived ovarian adenocarcinoma xenografts (PDX), using analytical tools specific for human (tumor-derived) rather than murine (host-derived) TSP-1.

Methodology: Human-specific microarray and ELISA were used to measure tumor TSP-1 expression and plasma levels.

Results: Tumor-derived TSP-1 was heterogeneously expressed in PDX. Expression was higher in the corresponding original patient's tumor, where stroma-derived TSP-1 is also analyzed, indicating that both the tumor and the host contribute to TSP-1 production. TSP-1 was differentially expressed according to tumor grade, but not affected by p53 expression or mutational status. Findings were confirmed in an external gene expression dataset (101 patients). In a functional enrichment analysis, TSP-1 correlated with genes related to angiogenesis, cell motility, communication and shape. Plasma TSP-1, detectable in 10/11 PDX, was not associated to its expression in the tumor. The possible association of plasma TSP-1 with p53 mutations and response to chemotherapy warrants further investigation.

Conclusions: Ovarian carcinoma PDX are a useful tool to investigate the relative contribution of stroma and tumor cells in the production of tumor associated factors, in relation to the tumor behavior, molecular properties and response to therapy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/03008207.2015.1045065DOI Listing
August 2016

Thrombospondin-1 is part of a Slug-independent motility and metastatic program in cutaneous melanoma, in association with VEGFR-1 and FGF-2.

Pigment Cell Melanoma Res 2015 Jan 13;28(1):73-81. Epub 2014 Oct 13.

Tumor Angiogenesis Unit, Department of Oncology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Bergamo, Italy.

Differently from most transformed cells, cutaneous melanoma expresses the pleiotropic factor thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1). Herein, we show that TSP-1 (RNA and protein), undetectable in four cultures of melanocytes and a RGP melanoma, was variously present in 13 cell lines from advanced melanomas or metastases. Moreover, microarray analysis of 55 human lesions showed higher TSP-1 expression in primary melanomas and metastases than in common and dysplastic nevi. In a functional enrichment analysis, the expression of TSP-1 correlated with motility-related genes. Accordingly, TSP-1 production was associated with melanoma cell motility in vitro and lung colonization potential in vivo. VEGF/VEGFR-1 and FGF-2, involved in melanoma progression, regulated TSP-1 production. These factors were coexpressed with TSP-1 and correlated negatively with Slug (SNAI2), a cell migration master gene implicated in melanoma metastasis. We conclude that TSP-1 cooperates with FGF-2 and VEGF/VEGFR-1 in determining melanoma invasion and metastasis, as part of a Slug-independent motility program.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pcmr.12319DOI Listing
January 2015

Current understanding of the thrombospondin-1 interactome.

Matrix Biol 2014 Jul 27;37:83-91. Epub 2014 Jan 27.

Tumor Angiogenesis Unit, Department of Oncology, IRCCS-Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, 24126 Bergamo, Italy. Electronic address:

The multifaceted action of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) depends on its ability to physically interact with different ligands, including structural components of the extracellular matrix, other matricellular proteins, cell receptors, growth factors, cytokines and proteases. Through this network, TSP-1 regulates the ligand activity, availability and structure, ultimately tuning the cell response to environmental stimuli in a context-dependent manner, contributing to physiological and pathological processes. Complete mapping of the TSP-1 interactome is needed to understand its diverse functions and to lay the basis for the rational design of TSP-1-based therapeutic approaches. So far, large-scale approaches to identify TSP-1 ligands have been rarely used, but many interactions have been identified in small-scale studies in defined biological systems. This review, based on information from protein interaction databases and the literature, illustrates current knowledge of the TSP-1 interactome map.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.matbio.2014.01.012DOI Listing
July 2014
-->