Publications by authors named "Della Collins Cook"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Pre-Columbian mycobacterial genomes reveal seals as a source of New World human tuberculosis.

Nature 2014 Oct 20;514(7523):494-7. Epub 2014 Aug 20.

1] Department of Archaeological Sciences, University of Tübingen, Ruemelinstraße 23, 72070 Tübingen, Germany [2] Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment, University of Tübingen, Tübingen 72070, Germany [3] Max Planck Institute for Science and History, Khalaische Straße 10, 07745 Jena, Germany.

Modern strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the Americas are closely related to those from Europe, supporting the assumption that human tuberculosis was introduced post-contact. This notion, however, is incompatible with archaeological evidence of pre-contact tuberculosis in the New World. Comparative genomics of modern isolates suggests that M. tuberculosis attained its worldwide distribution following human dispersals out of Africa during the Pleistocene epoch, although this has yet to be confirmed with ancient calibration points. Here we present three 1,000-year-old mycobacterial genomes from Peruvian human skeletons, revealing that a member of the M. tuberculosis complex caused human disease before contact. The ancient strains are distinct from known human-adapted forms and are most closely related to those adapted to seals and sea lions. Two independent dating approaches suggest a most recent common ancestor for the M. tuberculosis complex less than 6,000 years ago, which supports a Holocene dispersal of the disease. Our results implicate sea mammals as having played a role in transmitting the disease to humans across the ocean.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13591DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4550673PMC
October 2014

Synchrotron Reveals Early Triassic Odd Couple: Injured Amphibian and Aestivating Therapsid Share Burrow.

PLoS One 2013 21;8(6):e64978. Epub 2013 Jun 21.

Evolutionary Studies Institute, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa.

Fossorialism is a beneficial adaptation for brooding, predator avoidance and protection from extreme climate. The abundance of fossilised burrow casts from the Early Triassic of southern Africa is viewed as a behavioural response by many tetrapods to the harsh conditions following the Permo-Triassic mass-extinction event. However, scarcity of vertebrate remains associated with these burrows leaves many ecological questions unanswered. Synchrotron scanning of a lithified burrow cast from the Early Triassic of the Karoo unveiled a unique mixed-species association: an injured temnospondyl amphibian (Broomistega) that sheltered in a burrow occupied by an aestivating therapsid (Thrinaxodon). The discovery of this rare rhinesuchid represents the first occurrence in the fossil record of a temnospondyl in a burrow. The amphibian skeleton shows signs of a crushing trauma with partially healed fractures on several consecutive ribs. The presence of a relatively large intruder in what is interpreted to be a Thrinaxodon burrow implies that the therapsid tolerated the amphibian's presence. Among possible explanations for such unlikely cohabitation, Thrinaxodon aestivation is most plausible, an interpretation supported by the numerous Thrinaxodon specimens fossilised in curled-up postures. Recent advances in synchrotron imaging have enabled visualization of the contents of burrow casts, thus providing a novel tool to elucidate not only anatomy but also ecology and biology of ancient tetrapods.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0064978PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3689844PMC
October 2017

Brief communication: Conjoined twins at angel mounds? an ancient DNA perspective.

Am J Phys Anthropol 2011 Sep;146(1):138-42

Department of Anthropology, Indiana University-Bloomington, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA.

Conjoined twins are born when a single fertilized egg partially splits into two fetuses. A hypothetical case of infant conjoined twins from Angel Mounds, a Middle Mississippian site (A.D. 1050-1400) on the Ohio River near Evansville, Indiana, was discovered in 1941. Morphological analysis does not rule out the field interpretation of this double burial as twins. Ancient mitochondrial DNA recovered from both infants demonstrates that they were not maternal relatives, and hence that they cannot have been conjoined twins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.21557DOI Listing
September 2011

Tuberculosis in the New World: a study of ribs from the Schild Mississippian population, West-Central Illinois.

Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz 2006 Dec;101 Suppl 2:25-7

Departments of Anthropology and Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405-7100, USA.

Vertebral lesions have been the main evidence for infection by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) in paleopathology. Skeletal involvement is expected in a small percentage of infected individuals. Recently, several authors report a correlation between rib lesions and tuberculosis (TB) complex infection. This study tests the hypothesis that rib lesions can serve as a useful marker for MTC infection within the Mississippian Schild skeletal collection from West-Central Illinois. Ribs from 221 adults and juveniles were examined, and affected individuals were tested for TB complex infection. DNA from rib samples of affected individuals was amplified with primers targeting the IS6110 insertion element, which is common to all members of the TB complex. Although it cannot allow discrimination between different species of TB, IS6110 is present in many copies within their genomes, and its presence is thus an indication of MTC infection. The results support the use of rib lesions as a marker for TB infection. Additionally, we demonstrate that MTC DNA can be recovered from ribs that lack lesions in individuals who have lesions of other bones. We recommend that an examination of ribs be incorporated into investigations for TB.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0074-02762006001000005DOI Listing
December 2006

Introduction. Paleopathology.

Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz 2006 Dec;101 Suppl 2:5-7

Paleopathology Newsletter, Lexington, Kentucky, US.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0074-02762006001000002DOI Listing
December 2006

Neglected ancestors: Dr. Selby W.Plummer.

Paleopathol Newsl 2003 Sep(123):11-6

Indiana University, Bloomington, IN.

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September 2003